The importance of range time

This is a discussion on The importance of range time within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I know a lot of people value IDPA competition and tactical training more than just simply punching paper with slow well aimed shots at the ...

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Thread: The importance of range time

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    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    The importance of range time

    I know a lot of people value IDPA competition and tactical training more than just simply punching paper with slow well aimed shots at the range.

    But I'm compelled to think that proper fundamentals like stance, grip, sight alignment and trigger control are all very important.

    At some ranges, I am allowed to practice holster drawing and double tapping too which I find to be great practice and I've made it part of my punching paper routine. I throw in single handed and off hand shooting as well.

    How much do you guys think general range time should be part of our shooting diet? And how many combat handgun classes are minimum to be civilian combat ready so to speak?

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    VIP Member Array Easy8's Avatar
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    Extremely important, keeps you comfortable with the recoil an noise even though we wear ears. Desensitizing yourself to gunfire so your able to react confidently.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DetChris View Post
    I know a lot of people value IDPA competition and tactical training more than just simply punching paper with slow well aimed shots at the range.

    But I'm compelled to think that proper fundamentals like stance, grip, sight alignment and trigger control are all very important.

    At some ranges, I am allowed to practice holster drawing and double tapping too which I find to be great practice and I've made it part of my punching paper routine. I throw in single handed and off hand shooting as well.

    How much do you guys think general range time should be part of our shooting diet? And how many combat handgun classes are minimum to be civilian combat ready so to speak?
    The fundamentals are most important. Once those are down, the your training should begin. You train so that you know how to practice. Just punching paper is fun, but it really does nothing to develop the skills that are needed in an SD encounter. Now I am not saying that you will not be able to prevail, but the more tools that you have in your tool box, the better.

    Double tap is useless. You need to use reactive targets to get a sense of a response. This will condition your mind to shoot till the threat stops. Manipulations are very important as well. You should IMO be well versed in them. If you need a list of drills, let me know.

    As for training, I attended 5 classes from Nov. of last year thru Jan. of this year. That may be a bit much for an average carrier, but I do not want to be average...
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    Member Array Backwoodz's Avatar
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    fundamentals go out the window as soon as the heart rate climbs and adrenaline fills the body.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backwoodz View Post
    fundamentals go out the window as soon as the heart rate climbs and adrenaline fills the body.
    I am not sure where you heard this, but its not true...
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    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryball View Post
    The fundamentals are most important. Once those are down, the your training should begin. You train so that you know how to practice. Just punching paper is fun, but it really does nothing to develop the skills that are needed in an SD encounter. Now I am not saying that you will not be able to prevail, but the more tools that you have in your tool box, the better.

    Double tap is useless. You need to use reactive targets to get a sense of a response. This will condition your mind to shoot till the threat stops. Manipulations are very important as well. You should IMO be well versed in them. If you need a list of drills, let me know.

    As for training, I attended 5 classes from Nov. of last year thru Jan. of this year. That may be a bit much for an average carrier, but I do not want to be average...
    Yes very curious about the drills. Can you mention them here? I was about to PM you but thought this could help someone else out too. Thanks!

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    It is easier to show you some videos on it, than it is to write it out. Yea I am being lazy, but the content is good..this is a good start

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    darbo and DetChris like this.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    darbo, 40Bob and DetChris like this.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Backwoodz View Post
    fundamentals go out the window as soon as the heart rate climbs and adrenaline fills the body.
    It can until the little voice called "training" clicks in and you move and react like a muscle reflex. This is the entire point of "training".
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    Defensive carrying is just like anything else that requires a combination of physical and mental conditioning. You have to learn and you have to practice what you've learned. Some practice needs to be live fire, some should be dry fire. The fundamentals of shooting are a necessary base to build from but like golf, being proficient boils down to learning what to do correctly and practicing those skills regularly.
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    Like HB said You fundamentals are very important, marksmanship can certainly give you an edge, if nothing else confidence. That is what gives you the foundation to further improve. Then, when you get really good you can critique yourself. I shoot IDPA, but I am more of a martial artist, I use it for practice with my gear and running and gunning, I am in no danger of winning. If your gear will not work for you in a 100 round match it will not work on the street.

    When things go bad you will not rise to the occasion, you will sink to the level of your training. Training is for when you don't have time to think.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backwoodz View Post
    fundamentals go out the window as soon as the heart rate climbs and adrenaline fills the body.
    So, are you saying we shouldn't bother with training? Just "spray and pray"?

    Wow! That'll save me lots of money!
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    Ex Member Array Gearhead's Avatar
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    Personally, I place a high value on range time. High on my list of reasons for shooting is because I think it's an extremely relaxing hobby. I still get to IDPA practice sessions, but only about once per month, since the cost/availability of ammo and reloading components has forced me to cut back on the volume of shooting that I used to do. But I'm just fine spending an hour doing slow-fire on bullseye targets. It has also helped me to dust off my Weaver stance, which I prefer for slow-fire target shooting. It also gives me a good excuse to shoot some of my favorite guns, which are great shooters but don't get carried.

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    Member Array jtrnbow1's Avatar
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    There is a difference in knowing the fundamentals and practicing them until they are muscle memory. If you just know the fundamentals IMHO they will go out the window when the heart rate rises and adrenaline starts flowing; however, if you practice until they are muscle memory, then your muscles will automatically respond correctly. That is where drills, paper targets, and combat classes are very useful. You need as many classes and as much range time as it takes to develop muscle memory and retain it.

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