Anticipation (Not the good kind)

This is a discussion on Anticipation (Not the good kind) within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I hope this is the right forum to post this as it seemed the best suited for my quandary. (yup, I do use that word) ...

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Thread: Anticipation (Not the good kind)

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    Member Array Thunderspeaks's Avatar
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    Anticipation (Not the good kind)

    I hope this is the right forum to post this as it seemed the best suited for my quandary. (yup, I do use that word)

    Let me preface. I have fired firearms before, so this isn't my first time at the rodeo. That being said, it has been a very long time since the last time I did fire one.(not counting my recent failed attempts) My first shot is almost always in the black at 25 feet, but each subsequent shot is hard pressed to find the target. I can tell right off the bat that I am anticipating the gun going off, and everything I've read so far online confirms that I am. (always low and left) I really need some help from someone that knows what he or she is doing because at this point, I'm just carrying a loud noise maker that is only a real danger to myself. (Unless I pull a Superman and throw the gun at my target. I'm more accurate that way.)

    Any tips, tricks, or methods I could practice in order to stop myself from anticipating each shot? Classes in my area maybe? (Massachusetts/New Hampshire area)

    Thanks guys
    Matt

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    Member Array Bradyman1's Avatar
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    Dry fire, a lot. That will help you. Hold the gun on target and dry fire making sure the gun is on target after the trigger is pulled.
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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    What loads are you using in what type of weapon?

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    Member Array Vminghelli's Avatar
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    Try dry firing with a dime or penny on the top of the slide or barrel, the goal is to pull the trigger with out moving the weapon and causing the coin to fall. Builds muscle memory. Be sure to aim the weapon(in a safe direction) at a (safe) target.

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    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    Advice I always fall back on to combat flinching is "let the shot surprise you". Every shot should be like the first you ever took. Second one is "smoothly squeeze, not jerk, the trigger". The third is "hold your breath during your exhale then shoot". These three simple rules always gets me back to center.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    This is not a brush off, but a good instructor can have you corrected in about 10 minutes. Check with you LGS for an instructor and see if he/she cant help you. It work the time and the money.

    Tip: Take your first shot. Relax, then sight back in, close your eyes, take the next shot. See were it hits. Continue to do this. A lot of time the visual shock of recoil will make you flinch.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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    Array RoadRunner71's Avatar
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    1. lots of GOOD dry-fire. Practice does NOT make perfect. PERFECT practice makes perfect. A fair number is 100 GOOD dry-fires for every live fire round.
    2. sight alignment and trigger control is a LEARNED skill. You are not born with it but it CAN be learned. Don't get discouraged.
    3. follow through is not just for golfers. There are TWO sight pictures for EVERY shot.

    Without being there to see exactly what you are doing, we are just making educated guesses. An experienced shooting partner or, better yet, a professional trainer, at your side would be your best bet.
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    "Mind own business"
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    Member Array Thunderspeaks's Avatar
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    Thanks gang. Solid advice. As far as the loads I am using, they are target loads from whatever brand I can find on a shelf. (most commonly American Eagle from Federal I think.) I'm pretty sure they are 25 grain. (I am currently out of them at the moment) The lack of available ammunition is making practice much more difficult.

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    Member Array OldandInTheWay's Avatar
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    someone in another thread recommended dry firing with a laser, which will let you see exactly how and when your muzzle is moving. sounds like a good idea.
    Thunderspeaks and maxwell97 like this.
    "In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king."

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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thunderspeaks View Post
    Thanks gang. Solid advice. As far as the loads I am using, they are target loads from whatever brand I can find on a shelf. (most commonly American Eagle from Federal I think.) I'm pretty sure they are 25 grain. (I am currently out of them at the moment) The lack of available ammunition is making practice much more difficult.
    I was asking for caliber and size of weapon. I had to break some bad habits after too many .357's out of a 2" snubby.
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    Member Array Vuva3rae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldandInTheWay View Post
    someone in another thread recommended dry firing with a laser, which will let you see exactly how and when your muzzle is moving. sounds like a good idea.
    And if you don't want to attach a laser grip, there are little laser pointers for dry firing that you stick into the barrel. There are several brands. I haven't used any of them, and I'm not sure how much they cost.
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    Member Array Thunderspeaks's Avatar
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    Ah, sorry about that TDave. I'm using an H&K P30s 9mm

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    Distinguished Member Array lionround's Avatar
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    AFTER doing the dry fire exercises and possible after consulting an instructor, get some snap caps. Have someone else load your mags with some live rounds and some snap caps. Mix it up. Then you will know if you are anticipating the bang and the recoil because they have neither.
    I busted a mirror and got seven years bad luck, but my lawyer thinks he can get me five.
    -- Steven Wright
    1950 Colt .38 Police Positive Special
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    US Army 1973-1977, 95B

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    Member Array Thunderspeaks's Avatar
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    Thanks again guys. I'm going to give all the dry fire techniques a try as I don't currently have any ammunition. Hopefully I will be able to improve my aim. I'm trying to find a decent class in my area, but most of the ones I've found seem kind of sketchy.
    "Life is the best teacher, and her lessons are often learned too late, but when Thunder speaks, we have no choice but to listen."

    Wisdom imparted to me by an old, blind Mi'kmaq at ceremony. Unforgettable.

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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    If they haven't outlawed the NRA in your area, look up, on the NRA site, a basic pistol class. You need work on the fundamentals and this class will help you. Doing things on your own and doing them all day won't help if your doing it wrong.
    Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunder bolt...... Sun Tzu.

    The supreme art of war is to defeat the enemy without fighting........ Sun Tzu.

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