How do you train?

How do you train?

This is a discussion on How do you train? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Just as the title suggests, how do you train for self defense scenarios? I want to start doing more training that focuses on real life ...

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Thread: How do you train?

  1. #1
    Member Array woodrow's Avatar
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    How do you train?

    Just as the title suggests, how do you train for self defense scenarios? I want to start doing more training that focuses on real life possibilities. Tell me about your set up, drills, etc. Do you use snap caps, or any other training tools? This thread is meant to be a broad conversation of all different methods.
    Romans 12:21


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Kennydale's Avatar
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    I like practicing the draw (DRYFIRE). I try to do this in front of a mirror. I am getting good finally on front sight focus. I am getting a good consistent view with both eyes open, and the front sight is right at my strong (right) eye. I do need more work on my grasp especially with the weak hand.

  3. #3
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    Competition, even at the informal or club level, is a good training tool. Just the simple act of running against the clock creates a level of stress that doesn't exist if you're just poking holes in paper targets. Even better if your competition allows drawing from the holster and shooting on the move.
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  4. #4
    VIP Member Array sixgun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    Competition, even at the informal or club level, is a good training tool. Just the simple act of running against the clock creates a level of stress that doesn't exist if you're just poking holes in paper targets. Even better if your competition allows drawing from the holster and shooting on the move.
    This is pretty much what our club does. But Im going to add some senarios that involve drawing from concealment and some head shots to the mix this year.

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array squid86's Avatar
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    competition is always good. from the holster...even better. but if you dont have anyone you can compete against try getting a shot timer. if you cant afford a real on they even make apps for it, if you have a smart phone, that work pretty good. trying to beat someone or a time will be good because it will get you to draw faster. in a real self defense situation you will want to draw faster so this will help. as far as aiming, use instincts and both eyes open and aim center mass. i keep both my eyes open until i acquire the target and then will fine tune where shot placement will go, main thing is to get a shot on target fast. then i like to train with silhouette targets only with my CCW.
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  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    Training consist of 15% marksmanship, 15% gun handling, and 70% mindset and tactics. The latter is a good place to start. Never practice like your shooting targets, they are not targets, they are threats, treat them as such. Never tell yourself you have a weak side, you don't. You have a gun hand and a support hand, and get used to using both. Don't assume that everything on your person will be in tact or uninjured when the battle begins, it might not be. One handed shooting, both hands, one handed reloads, both hands, unorthodox shooting positions, you won't always be squared of to the threat with it right in front of you. Practice shooting 360 degrees with both hands. Don't forget the fundamentals, but even when you practice them, don't practice shooting at paper targets, remember, they are threats and are trying to kill you, treat them accordingly. Develop a defensive mindset that includes, you will prevail no matter what, and you will never give up, no matter what. There have been volumes written on this subject, and many more to come. I know that this just scratches the surface, but if you do these few things, it will help you. Good luck, be safe out there.
    HandgunWorld likes this.
    Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunder bolt...... Sun Tzu.

    The supreme art of war is to defeat the enemy without fighting........ Sun Tzu.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    I train two to three times a week using laser dry-fire cartridges and the OCAT Laser System. I use the built in shot timer to give me random draw starts, set it to loop 2-5 times to simulate multiple attackers, 3 shots per target, moving between attackers. I normally run that 10-15 times. When it really doesn't cost you anything to practice and you can do it in your garage, you get a lot more practice.

    Just remember that between all of that dry fire, you still need to go out to the range and put those rounds down range.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    In order of priority:
    1. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    2. Take combatives (H2H) training
    3. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    4. Train off hand 30 percent of the time
    5. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    6. Stop using static targets or a static postion. Find a range that allows you to do proper drills
    7. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    8. Practice your concealed draw at least 30 times a day from every postion you normally are in
    9. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    10. Have someone put malfunctions in your magazines so you will be surprised during training and have to react to malfunction drills
    11. Stay physically , emotionally, and religouly healthy
    Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”
    And I said, “Here am I. Send me!”

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  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    I am not a cop, nor am I a drug addict, or a dealer. This takes me out of the 90% of people who get shot every year in the US. So My training revolves around staying clear of thos people. Stay out of neighborhoods infested with drugs. Don't hang out in bars. So whats left is avoiding them on the street and places I have business.

    I train to be polite in my car, To watch for that person who is out of place, and carry for that 10% of situations that are unavoidable. DR

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    Lately I've been training in my basement with an airsoft. It allows me to draw from concealment, move from my initial position, rapid fire in burst of three and engage multiple targets. These are things most ranges don't allow. I need to find a place that will allow me to do these things with my EDC but that's what I currently do. I've thought about going to some IPDA events but I've been toying with the idea of changing my carry location from 3:00 to AIWB since I think it would improve my time. I believe the IPDA dictates where to may draw from.
    rick21 likes this.
    "I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power, than by violent and sudden usurpations” – James Madison 1788

  11. #11
    Member Array archercj1954's Avatar
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    Training is tough nowadays with the cost of ammo, even ball. I like the idea of using the laser simulators, just don't know much about them. I dry-fire 15 minutes every week. I focus on the basic draw and present, immediate action/malfunction, and magazine change. I also throw in one "non-standard" task (one-handed reload, draw from the prone, etc) per week. I go to the range once per quarter and put at least 200 rounds down range with my EDC. I shoot various scenarios at the silhouettes from muzzle contact range to 25 yards, both static and moving, but focus on 3-3-3: 3 rounds (2 in the torso 4 inches apart; assess; 1 in the cranio-ocular cavity) in 3 seconds at 3 yards. I know there are a lot of ways. I try to keep it basic. I'm old. Bottom line is, training is good and necessary if you're going to carry.
    Retired Combat Infantryman, Ranger, Special Forces, Master Parachutist, Pathfinder

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  12. #12
    Member Array Ken Grant's Avatar
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    LaserLyte System
    Airsoft
    .22 LR Conversion Kits

    Will meet most training needs at home or range without a lot of cost except for purchase.

  13. #13
    Member Array HandgunWorld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exacto View Post
    Training consist of 15% marksmanship, 15% gun handling, and 70% mindset and tactics. The latter is a good place to start. Never practice like your shooting targets, they are not targets, they are threats, treat them as such. Never tell yourself you have a weak side, you don't. You have a gun hand and a support hand, and get used to using both. Don't assume that everything on your person will be in tact or uninjured when the battle begins, it might not be. One handed shooting, both hands, one handed reloads, both hands, unorthodox shooting positions, you won't always be squared of to the threat with it right in front of you. Practice shooting 360 degrees with both hands. Don't forget the fundamentals, but even when you practice them, don't practice shooting at paper targets, remember, they are threats and are trying to kill you, treat them accordingly. Develop a defensive mindset that includes, you will prevail no matter what, and you will never give up, no matter what. There have been volumes written on this subject, and many more to come. I know that this just scratches the surface, but if you do these few things, it will help you. Good luck, be safe out there.
    Very well said! I'd like to add, train with the gun you carry the most. Leave the others for fun and games. When you need it the most, you better be good with it. Don't be the guy who trains and competes with a full size 1911 and carries a J Frame revolver.

    I teach students that gun fight is a fight first, the gun is 2nd. Remember that it's a fight, so train for that. The gun is your tool to help you get out of the fight. But your primary training should be based on how to win the fight.

    Competition is good and I advocate it all the time and still compete. However, the only real training it provides, in my opinion is good gun handling skills.
    Bob Mayne
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  14. #14
    Distinguished Member Array chuckusaret's Avatar
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    I do the normal range training at least monthly, draw/dry fire several times per week, and have taken the NRA personal protection in home and outside of home courses, several low light laser training courses, one combat course, not to mention my military training.

    I would have say that the two low light laser courses that I attended pointed out my shortfalls very quickly. The course did improve my draw to target hit time from all possible stationary/moving positions on a stationary and a moving target at various ranges. Iron sights were not used. The course was taught by a guy that was prior military and was employed as a personal bodyguard for many years and is now on contract to a foreign country.
    US Army 1953-1977

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  15. #15
    Member Array TuckerSnoCat's Avatar
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    I'm fortunate that I can shoot in my backyard whenever I'd like to. I built a large backstop that stops a 50 bmg. I train with my carry weapons 3 to 4 days a week., Drawing and firing at IDPA targets or metal plates from various types of cover, standing still and in motion, with a timer. Various holsters, mainly my reloads (cheap) which I continually experiment with but also w my carry ammo intermittently to keep my skills tuned w my carry setup.I create my own IDPA type scenarios.

    I enjoy cowboy action shooting w a pair of SAA Colt clones - very fun, usually shooting at metal plates.

    At night if I just have to shoot I use a 10m olympic air pistol in the basement.

    I can shoot to 100 yards in the backyard but I also train across the road from the house on my own long range rifle course, 400 to 1000 yards. I enjoy that type of marksmanship too, developing and tweaking loads.

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