Dry fire drills

Dry fire drills

This is a discussion on Dry fire drills within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; How many do you do per day. I am working on full draw and dry fire....

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Thread: Dry fire drills

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    Member Array ditchdoc1017's Avatar
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    Dry fire drills

    How many do you do per day. I am working on full draw and dry fire.


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    Several.
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    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    I dont do any. I know modern firearms are supposed to be fine with being dry fired.

    But being older I was raised that one thing youd better not do with anyones firearm you were looking at or handling or a LGS firearms was dry fire. It was pounded in my head until the sight of a dry fired weapon makes my teeth grind.

    Again I know most modern guns it wont hurt em. Just one of those ingrained things I guess. If im pulling the trigger theres a live round in the chamber period.
    " It is sad governments are chief'ed by the double tongues." quote Ten Bears Movie Outlaw Josie Wales

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    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    I don't everyday, but I do practice full draw, mag changes, low ready to firing, trigger pull, and I try to work on "staying on the front sight" during most of my dry fire practice.
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine

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    Member Array ditchdoc1017's Avatar
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    That's the one thing I have been working on is keeping sight on target.

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    Distinguished Member Array sealteam20001's Avatar
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    It's a good drill.

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    Member Array ditchdoc1017's Avatar
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    The other drill I am working on shooting with both eyes open.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ditchdoc1017 View Post
    The other drill I am working on shooting with both eyes open.
    Dry fire practice DEF helps with this. When I first started shooting, I couldn't hold a sight picture with both eyes open, now after tons of practice with it - it feels weird to close one eye.

    I do dry fire practice almost everyday, at least 5 days a week - usually 15 trigger pulls of each - both hands RH, both hands LH, RH only and LH only. Then have started to also throw in more with just using trigger reset to burn into memory always using the trigger reset. About every 3rd or 4th session I'll do dry fire with drawing from the holster - standing, sitting and moving.

    Dry fire practice has got me through this ammo draught, I've built quite a little regimen.
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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    I do mine with a CT equipped SP 101, still working on keeping both eyes open.

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    Member Array ditchdoc1017's Avatar
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    I was looking at the laser light trainer. But 200 will buy a lot of 45

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    Distinguished Member Array Glock2201's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost1958 View Post
    I dont do any. I know modern firearms are supposed to be fine with being dry fired.

    But being older I was raised that one thing youd better not do with anyones firearm you were looking at or handling or a LGS firearms was dry fire. It was pounded in my head until the sight of a dry fired weapon makes my teeth grind.

    Again I know most modern guns it wont hurt em. Just one of those ingrained things I guess. If im pulling the trigger theres a live round in the chamber period.
    What about snap caps?

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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ditchdoc1017 View Post
    I was looking at the laser light trainer. But 200 will buy a lot of 45
    I do laser training 2-3 times a week, shooting between 50-100 "virtual rounds" on each session. I don't use the Laser Lyte system, I use the OCAT System. It has improved my shooting a lot in the last year. When I get out to the range, you can really tell all the practice I get in.

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    Senior Member Array cn262's Avatar
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    I try to dry practice 2-3 times per week, about 20 minutes each time. I use a timer for various drills, practice moving and commands, and also practice Type 1-3 malfunction drills each time. I don't focus on reps - rather going through the motions accurately and as quickly as possible (hence the timer). I use snap caps as well - more for reload and malfunction drills. It does make a difference.

    The first time I noticed anything was about a year ago at the range. I pulled the trigger - nothing. Instinctively I did the tap, rack, ready and was pointed-in on target with my finger applying pressure to the trigger. It was only after it was done that I realize what had happened. That was all the proof I needed to believe in muscle memory and the power of practice.

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    I only do draw/dry fire practice about once a week. I probably should do more. The weeks I don't do it and then go to the range, you can tell the difference. I clearly shoot better when I've practiced dry firing and keeping sight picture on target.
    "Freedom and discipline have come to be regarded as mutually exclusive, when in fact freedom is not at all the opposite, but the final reward of discipline" - Elisabeth Elliot

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    Senior Member Array tmoore912's Avatar
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    I try and dry fire practise for about 10 minutes 2-3 times per week (I should do it even more frequent). I've seen big improvements in my accuracy at speed and gun handling skills. Gun handling and shooting accuracy are perishable skills that you have to practise to maintain.

    Years ago I was led to a great place for training information/drills by a friend of mine. There are others out there, but I use this website the most. This is a excellent dry fire routine blog post by Todd Green on his Pistol-Training.com website. He also has some great Drills with printable targets at his site. pistol-training.com » Blog Archive » Dry Fire Routine


    Dry Fire Routine
    25-Aug-11 – 10:29 by ToddG

    A few months ago, I quickly put together an example of a dry fire routine for a friend who just got a SIRT pistol and wanted to make good use of it. The approach involves having a month-long plan. Instead of doing the same thing every day for a month and then changing the routine when you feel comfortable, this is designed to put emphasis on the important things and still get in some practice of less in-demand skills. It also keeps things interesting so you don’t burn out doing nothing but press-outs or basic trigger press drills day after day.

    Keep the sessions short. Five 10-minute practices a week beats a grueling 50-minute practice once a week.
    Vary the sessions. Don’t have one routine, have ten or twenty.
    Practice everything. Don’t just work on what you’re good at. Don’t just work on what you’re bad at.
    Focus intelligently. If your basic marksmanship is weak, don’t spend 80% of your time doing weak hand only double-feed clearance practice.
    Use Saturdays and Sundays for make-up days if you miss a practice.
    A good approach is to set up a “basic” routine and then a number of more specific routines. Let’s define a hypothetical basic routine:

    1. 20 reps of Wall Drill from extension, 2H
    2. 5 reps of Wall Drill from extension, SHO
    3. 5 reps of Wall Drill from extension, WHO
    4. 20 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H
    5. 5 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, SHO
    6. 5 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, WHO

    That’s a 10-15 minute session. You’ve done 60 deliberate, slow, perfect trigger presses. You’ve practiced your press-out 30 times. One third of your marksmanship practice has been one handed.

    Next, we’ll look at a month’s worth of training. We’ll call it four weeks, dry firing five times a week (Mo-Fr).

    When a speed is indicated as “slow” it means no faster than you can guarantee that every movement and every moment is perfectly in proper form. When a speed is indicated as “3/4 speed” it means go at a pace you are doing things right and not fumbling. If you start fumbling, slow down as much as necessary and get in good reps. Good reps are much better than fast reps.

    Week 1:

    Monday, basic routine

    Tuesday, draws

    1. 10 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H
    2. 20 reps of Wall Drill from the holster, 2H
    3. 5 reps of Wall Drill from the holster, SHO
    4. 5 reps of Wall Drill from the holster, WHO
    5. 10 reps draw & fire at 3/4 speed, 2H
    6. 10 reps draw & fire, slow, 2H

    Wednesday, reloads

    1. 10 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H
    2. 20 reps reload from slidelock, slow, 2H
    3. 20 reps reload from slidelock, 3/4 speed, 2H
    4. 10 reps reload from slidelock, slow, 2H
    5. 10 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H

    Thursday, basic routine

    Friday, movement

    1. 10 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H
    2. 10 draws stepping right, 3/4 speed, 2H
    3. 10 draws stepping left, 3/4 speed, 2H
    4. 10 reloads stepping right (reload on the move), 3/4 speed, 2H
    5. 10 reloads stepping left (reload on the move), 3/4 speed, 2H
    6. 10 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H

    More info at the link.......
    GeorgiaCarry.org
    GPDO SAF NRA
    Let Not My Last Thought Be, If Only I Had My Gun.

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