Safety Solutions Academy in Ohio?

Safety Solutions Academy in Ohio?

This is a discussion on Safety Solutions Academy in Ohio? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Anyone done any training with Paul Carlson there? If so, would you recommend it to others? It isn't too far from me, and they offer ...

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  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    Safety Solutions Academy in Ohio?

    Anyone done any training with Paul Carlson there? If so, would you recommend it to others?

    It isn't too far from me, and they offer ICE's Combat Focus Shooting, which I have wanted to take.
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine


  2. #2
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    I haven't taken anything from Paul, yet, but a good friend of mine has. He thought it was a good class - and what's more, that Paul is a good instructor.

    This friend of mine has had two classes so far, a one-day introduction "Fighting Pistol" class from a local instructor (who is unfortunately no longer in the firearms side of things, nevertheless, he remains very well-regarded locally here in NE-Ohio, and beyond), as well as Chris Costa's three-day Costa Ludus "Handgun Employment 01."

    The class he took from Paul was "Fundamentals of Combat Focus Shooting," which was then followed by a day with Daniel Shaw of Paratus Academy. Overall, my friend was more impressed with Daniel's class - but that, he confessed, simply may be because Daniel's step-up class material (Daniel re-worked his class syllabus the morning of, after having seen the students' performance at Paul's class the day before) was more on his level: that the introductory CFS class was perhaps just too basic for him.

    Overall, there's a lot of good instructors that come to your area. Check the roster at Alias Training, as well as cruise the Training sub-Forum of M4Carbine.net .

    What's your shooting and training experience like, now? Why do you want to look at CFS?

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    I was bummed that I missed the class with Daniel Shaw, I listen to his podcast and have gleaned a lot of good info from him.

    I want to take CFS because I have heard good things about it, and I like to learn various things from various instructors.
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badey View Post
    I was bummed that I missed the class with Daniel Shaw, I listen to his podcast and have gleaned a lot of good info from him.
    IIRC, that was part of the reason why my buddy signed up for the two day.

    It certainly seems like Daniel knows how to step up a class to keep pace with the students' capabilities. If my buddy is impressed, I'm impressed - I trust him implicitly.

    I want to take CFS because I have heard good things about it, and I like to learn various things from various instructors.
    I'm definitely one of those who feel that breadth-of-knowledge is just as important as depth-of-knowledge. I'm still in the phase of learning where breadth-of-knowledge is more important: I don't know what I don't know. I've even posted about this on the Ohioans for Concealed Carry Forums.

    Although I would like to take a lesson from Paul, I confess to wanting to take CFS from Pincus, direct. I'm a little leery of "the disciple effect," and FWIW, after reading about CFS (specifically the CFS extracts from Pincus's "Counter Ambush" series), I feel as if I really need to get this from the source, given that I already do not agree with some of this particular shooting methodology.

    I've been through a few courses with some household names and a few with just really, really, really good local instructors (one of whom has a really, really impressive CV that he humbly doesn't share, unless asked directly). Universally, they all say one thing: that it's simply all about the fundamentals, and that if anyone is selling a "system," to approach that with caution.

    It is with this in-mind that I posed my previous question: what's your shooting/training experience like, now?

    If you have a chance to do so, read/view first-hand the CFS methodology before you invest in a class.

    There are a lot of really, really good schools out there - CFS isn't cheap, and each of these classes will eat up your valuable time as well as ammo. If you're going to travel all that way for a class, Cleveland/NE-Ohio typically plays host to the likes of Hackathorn, Costa, Vickers, and Vogel at least once a year or so, and I'd say that those are worth the drive - but that anything less, you'd be better off to look simply to your local instructors, which may well offer very high bang-for-the-buck classes. Additionally, I'd encourage you to look at the Alias Training site, some of their highly qualified instructors can be found close to your area. Redback One and ShivWorks also goes through your area at least once a year, IIRC.

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    I have a decent knowledge/training on the fundamental, drawing, reloading, sight picture, trigger press, etc.

    I have some knowledge/training in defensive handgun. I think I would like some more advanced training (one-handed manipulation, point shooting, low-light, etc.). I did not know that some of those bigger names came to this area, and will definitely check their schedules!
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    ^ If you've got a good working knowledge base, it would be worthwhile to see what the individual instructors/schools stipulate as their requirements for you to place into their intermediate-tier classes. Be sure to be honest about the requirements: you don't want to be "that guy" in the class.

    Single-handed manipulations are typically reserved for intermediate-level shooters: there's a lot that can go wrong. That's not something that's going to - or should - be covered in most introduction/beginners' classes. Chris Costa's Costa Ludus Handgun Employment 02 is very well known for guiding the starting intermediate-level shooter safely through such awkward manipulations, and has rolled through NE-Ohio once a year for the past two years (I was set to repeat it this year, but a new puppy forced me to sell my seat to a friend instead - it's a class I've been looking forward to repeating since last October!). Look at the HE02 AARs online, and you'll see just how intense it can get.

    Low-light and point-shooting are typically specialty classes taught separate from fundamental manipulations as separate techniques. The latter, especially, is something that is somewhat contested, and if you want to pursue that route, I would recommend that you go to a school/instructor that specializes in true point-shooting (and not CFS, which is - at least through my understanding of their course reading materials - a hybrid of sighted and un-sighted) such as the Suarez International schools. Many good instructors will teach "instinctive" shooting as a part of their intermediate-to-advanced syllabus or will introduce it at the beginner level to compliment the ideas of natural point-of-aim and to highlight the importance of stance/grip/trigger control, but true point-shooting is an art.

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