Dry Fire Practice

This is a discussion on Dry Fire Practice within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; What does everybody here do for dry fire practice? I think dry fire is a great way to keep your skills up, and actually make ...

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Thread: Dry Fire Practice

  1. #1
    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Dry Fire Practice

    What does everybody here do for dry fire practice? I think dry fire is a great way to keep your skills up, and actually make you better.



    I wrote a blog post on what I do here: http://tattooedgunner.blogspot.com/2...-practice.html
    ~Mike
    Glock 17, Dale Fricke Archangel, Wilderness Tactical belt.
    My Guns and Tattoos Blog

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    Member Array WisconsinJohns's Avatar
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    I agree. Helps me improve the trigger pull. I have a ways to go.
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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    The problem I found with dry fire practice in the past is that it actually reinforced bad habits. If you were pulling the trigger wrong (yanking, or curling your finger or etc.) there was really no way of knowing it. You just practiced the same thing over and over again, making that bad habit a part of you.

    That is why I like the OCAT System with a laser training cartridge. You can see where you are hitting, you can see how much muzzle movement there is and you can see the direction of that muzzle movement. You can set up the laser system just about anywhere and go to town. The other nice part is that because the size of the circles show the amount of movement in the muzzle, it kind of automatically forces you to shrink those circles and get a quiet gun.
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    Yes, has added a lot of improvement to my shooting. I dry fire practice a few nights a week - 15 or so pulls with each RH 2 hand grip, LH 2 hand grip, RH only, LH only. Really tough, but good to work on one hand practice. And every couple of sessions I'll practice draws and moving. I'm a big fan - plus its helped a lot during the ammo shortage for keeping up my skills up (plus have gotten fondle time with my guns when I wasn't able to get to the range regularly).
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    The problem I found with dry fire practice in the past is that it actually reinforced bad habits. If you were pulling the trigger wrong (yanking, or curling your finger or etc.) there was really no way of knowing it. You just practiced the same thing over and over again, making that bad habit a part of you.
    That's only really true if you're practicing hip shooting or if you have your eyes closed. If you're looking at the sights while dryfiring, your mistakes are much more obvious than when dryfiring.

    I have my dryfire regimens recorded on CD, although I hate that the MP3 compression gives me a lisp.

    Some drink at the fountain of Knowledge, others just gargle.

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    Right now, I'm into my second run of 1000 days of consecutive dryfire and I will be done in January 2016. I did the first about 10 years ago and it really improved my shooting and gunhandling.

    Some drink at the fountain of Knowledge, others just gargle.

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    Sounds like the Terminator is playing in the background....

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    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeadHunter View Post
    Right now, I'm into my second run of 1000 days of consecutive dryfire and I will be done in January 2016. I did the first about 10 years ago and it really improved my shooting and gunhandling.
    1000 Straight days of dry fire? That sounds like a great idea!
    ~Mike
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    My Guns and Tattoos Blog

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    Man, now I wanna watch Terminator! lol. That's a pretty good idea making a recording to practice to with timed beeps and all, and I like your mag change drill - I need to include that in some of my practice. I remember a few months ago I was going to my first IDPA match and did dry fire practice every night for a little over a month I believe - I surprised myself throughout most the match. I have continued ever since, just not EVERY day.
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    Member Array CWOLDOJAX's Avatar
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    Taking a class and videoing yourself is a great idea.
    "for God gave us a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control." -- Paul

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    Member Array Flap's Avatar
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    To improve what one must, one must first know what or where needs to be improved.

    With respect to trigger action, pull, grip etc., having a close up visible indication seems a must. Either by some sort of fine optic, ala Laser placed on target (s) so movement of the aim point can be easily noticed during the trigger pull.

    I’ve found, follow thru is important. Right after the trigger breaks, holding solidly to that point of aim for one second helps. Then begin another trigger pull.

    Having a camera hooked to a video display and focused in tight to the aim point is a real added benefit in that it shows up even minor, miniscule movements. It’s not necessary I think to film a series of practice dry fired shots, other than as a base line preliminary then Thereafter, periodically… perhaps.

    I’d feel it more important to video myself, or recording in tighter to my grip and action of handling and operating the pistol or revolver as a plus..

    Of course one has whatever finite resources and should take advantage of whatever they may be as is pertinent.

    But there is no question watching objectively how one shoots and looking closely for POA movement during the action is a great area for immediate feedback and a huge help in becoming a better shot… but live fire is the only true way to improve oneself.

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