Should you get training?

Should you get training?

This is a discussion on Should you get training? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I wrote a post on my blog on my thoughts on whether you should get training or not if you carry a gun. Hint: You ...

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Thread: Should you get training?

  1. #1
    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Should you get training?

    I wrote a post on my blog on my thoughts on whether you should get training or not if you carry a gun. Hint: You should. What do y'all think?

    Tattooed Gunner: Should you get training? What about DVDs, Books, YouTube?
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  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Nice article.

    To your point about training. Yes, you should get training.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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  3. #3
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    It depends.
    If you are completely new to firearms, then yes. But the extent of the training is debatable. You need to be very proficient with your ability to handle your weapon safety, maintain it, and shoot well by understanding the principles of marksmanship.

    If you are well familiar with guns, and can shoot well, it may depend on how much you are in to the whole defensive mindset thing and where your focus is.

    There are those who are eat up with the defensive aspect of it. They think of nothing else, and live, breath and eat it 24/7.

    Then there are people who just enjoy shooting, have done it for years, and can get thru life quite well with some research and practical application.

    It depends on you, and your focus. For me, I could care less about all the hype of if you don't train, you will get killed and that stuff. Even though I am military and LE trained, I feel I was we'll prepared for everyday life in the good ol USA long before the professional training.

    I also believe that education in the use of force is more important to both groups listed here than anything else.

    So it's up to you, and where your mind and priorities are.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

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    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    I think everyone who carries for self defense should get some training. In addition to training everyone should develope a practice regimen.

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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Great article, and I agree completely re the need for real fighting pistol training. When crunch time hits, you will respond like you have either practiced, or been trained.

    If your practice has been standing stationary at a traditional range, where you are not allowed to draw from a holster, I predict that it could fall apart fast for you.
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    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    I think everyone who carries for self defense should get some training. In addition to training everyone should develope a practice regimen.
    This is another pro of training I forgot to list. Training teaches you what and how to practice.
    ~Mike
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  7. #7
    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    It depends.
    If you are completely new to firearms, then yes. But the extent of the training is debatable. You need to be very proficient with your ability to handle your weapon safety, maintain it, and shoot well by understanding the principles of marksmanship.

    If you are well familiar with guns, and can shoot well, it may depend on how much you are in to the whole defensive mindset thing and where your focus is.

    There are those who are eat up with the defensive aspect of it. They think of nothing else, and live, breath and eat it 24/7.

    Then there are people who just enjoy shooting, have done it for years, and can get thru life quite well with some research and practical application.

    It depends on you, and your focus. For me, I could care less about all the hype of if you don't train, you will get killed and that stuff. Even though I am military and LE trained, I feel I was we'll prepared for everyday life in the good ol USA long before the professional training.

    I also believe that education in the use of force is more important to both groups listed here than anything else.

    So it's up to you, and where your mind and priorities are.
    You are probably right. The vast majority of us will never need to use our gun. The vast majority of those that do probably won't even have to fire.

    I wouldn't say that I am eat up with it 24/7, I don't go through life constantly worrying about being attacked. I do think though in the even that something bad does happen, I want the best chance to come out of it that I can have.
    ~Mike
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    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
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    I think that some training is a very good supplement to those who carry. But I am more in the camp with Glockman10mm. I have taken some extra training beyond the state required training, but I don't plan to go off to training camps for extremely intensive training. For those who want to, go right ahead. Its just not my thing. I feel comfortable with my level of training and abilities to carry my 5 shot snubbie and stay out of trouble.

    A few months back there was a thread started about a study that concluded that even those with moderate to almost no training still were able percentage wise able to defend themselves against aggressors.
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    Ex Member Array LostScout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kg4ghn View Post
    I wrote a post on my blog on my thoughts on whether you should get training or not if you carry a gun. Hint: You should. What do y'all think?

    Tattooed Gunner: Should you get training? What about DVDs, Books, YouTube?
    Nice article.

    I'm always flabbergasted when people defend not training as a good thing. How does a wo/man become proficient?. (I better insert here that I'm not one of those who suggest you have to get a certificate from every Ex-SEAL-school.)

    Now, after a few decades of competitive shooting, military, etc., I'm more inclined to study the legal aspects of use of force. I maintain my proficiency with dryfiring and regular range sessions; I think, is a must.

    Those who prefer not to practice, good luck to you.

    Yup, you should.
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    Distinguished Member Array Wunderneun's Avatar
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    I think defensive pistol training is a good idea, along with the laws regarding deadly use of force. I learned a lot attending the 40 hour Manditory Firearms Training for LEO's in Illinois. Before that I was just punching paper. After my training I started shooting IDPA.

    The LEO training was the best I ever had and instilled instinct and muscle memory that I will fall back on when things go south instead of standing there fumbling trying to draw my handgun.

    Not everyone need that level of training, but you do need to practise drawing and firing many times to be proficient at it and to be able to do it without even thinking about it should that time ever come.
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    Senior Member Array cn262's Avatar
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    Nice article.

    I grew up being told that anything worth doing is worth doing right, and anything important is worth doing to the best of your ability. This basic tenet has served me well over these many years. The goal isn't to be the absolute best, but rather the best you can be within reason. One aspect of this is that what is important to you today may be less important to you in the future. So, while many skills are perishable, I do believe there is a certain degree of "muscle memory" that always sticks with you - increasing your long-term abilities and confidence.

    Ten years ago I would have said that it is important to be safe and proficient with firearms, but would have seen little need for defensive firearm training. I was all for martial arts - but more from the aspect of fitness and accomplishment. Competition was fun (high-power rifle and tae kwon do) - but it was just about competing and not so much being done for the translational value of the skills being learned (although that value was there).

    Today I'm getting as much defensive training as I have time for and can afford. That includes training at various facilities, local training with people having similar interests, range time, dry practice, and reading relevant books and watching training videos to try to learn tips. Do I expect to ever need to use these skills - no. But, if there is ever a need then I want to be as proficient as possible to maximize the possibility of protecting my family and myself. This is important to me and what I feel is right for me, but I would never expect the same out of everyone. It is a very personal choice IMO.

    I would personally hope that anyone who carries a firearm would want to be safe and proficient (which might not require additional training based on their background), but I believe that until someone has made that leap to understand that you may need to someday protect the the life of loved one or someone else then it just won't be a top priority. But, as long as those people aren't doing things that are stupid and/or dangerous (i.e., anything that puts 2A at risk) then they may come around sometime in the future, and I'm OK with that.
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    No, I absolutely refuse to get any training whatsoever. I will carry my small-caliber, six shot jamomatic in that fourteen-dollar nylon holster with the big metal clip the fella at the LGS recommended. Sure, my gun usually fails after the first round or two, but so what? If my shot placement is good, I will probably only need one shot, anyhow. Since I have already practiced punching paper at twenty-one feet, I know I can put that first shot right on the money. I read the Ohio Attorney General's concealed carry booklet, so I know all I need to know about self-defense laws and Castle Doctrine. Besides, I hardly ever actually carry a gun. I have shown everyone my Concealed Handgun License, so I'm sure the word is out that I'm not a man to be trifled with.
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    Member Array mjbeam's Avatar
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    Everyone who carries should know the laws where they carry and be proficient enough not to be a danger to others.

    I personally don't care if they can effectively defend themselves with their weapon, that's their problem. As long as they aren't ignorant of the laws and not a danger to those around them, it's all good.

  14. #14
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    Exclamation Absolutely

    Quote Originally Posted by mjbeam View Post
    Everyone who carries should know the laws where they carry and be proficient enough not to be a danger to others.

    I personally don't care if they can effectively defend themselves with their weapon, that's their problem. As long as they aren't ignorant of the laws and not a danger to those around them, it's all good.
    And how are you going to GET proficient enough not to be a danger to others? Lots of back 40 plinking? Me thinks not!

    When we first got our carry permits hubby found an indoor range about 45 minutes from where we live and so every time we drove in that direction we stopped to practice. The owner, after watching us a few times, invited us to join his invitational shoots (half self defense and half IDPA style). The catch was that we had to take his intro class. I was really up for it because of very little shooting experience. I asked Hubby, who had been an extremely active and proficient shooter for years and years, if he really was willing to do that. His response: "There is no such thing as too much training!"

    After having gone to a top notch school for several types of defensive firearms classes since that first little basic class, I totally agree. Sadly, now that we have become too old (the body does start wearing out) to be able to keep up with the 30 to 50 year olds in the "real" schools, we only have our local shooting club range on which to practice, but still try to set up courses of fire that reinforce our training.

    A person who carries a gun without formal training scares the heck out of me!!!!
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    As stated training is a completely individual preference however to me it is kind of everyone's problem.

    Many purchase a firearm for self defense and do not have to fire a single round or spend 2 minutes in a classroom. Some have never handled a firearm before in their life save what little time was spent at the gun store counter but now are ready for action.

    Granted many of these type folks will probably never carry their firearm after a couple of weeks after the newness wear's off but some will continue to carry with the confidence that I have a gun, therefore I am safe. So while seated in Taco Bell and a SD encounter occurs he now feel's since he is armed he can take out the bad guy and save the day. Unfortunately he cannot and gets himself shot, shoots someone else or with my luck is the guy seated behind me when all this starts.

    Just like part of my signature line says "There are those who say "if I had to do it, I could" yet they never go out and train to do it." but to each his own.
    "A first rate man with a third rate gun is far better than the other way around". The gun is a tool, you are the craftsman that makes it work. There are those who say "if I had to do it, I could" yet they never go out and train to do it. Don't let stupid be your mindset. Harryball 2013

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