Another reason for training and practice

This is a discussion on Another reason for training and practice within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This is the reason for making your training and practice your own. Do it to the point you don't think about it, it just happens. ...

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Thread: Another reason for training and practice

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    Another reason for training and practice

    This is the reason for making your training and practice your own. Do it to the point you don't think about it, it just happens.


    Sheepdog tip of the day: 9/17



    Pomerleau and Lazzarini found that when the average police officer
    experiences a stress induced (i.e., adrenaline-induced) heart rate increase
    in the area of 145 beats per minute (bpm), there is a significant breakdown
    in performance. But this is not true for everyone. Apparently, if you have
    practiced the required skills extensively, you can "push the envelope" of
    Condition Red, enabling extraordinary performance at accelerated heart rate
    levels. Let us call this zone, roughly between 145 and 175 bpm, "Condition
    Gray." (Beyond Condition Gray is "Condition Black," an area marked by
    catastrophic breakdown of mental and physical performance.) Lt. Col. Dave
    Grossman, On Combat

    Sheepdog Tip of the Day, During Combat tip 28
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    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

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  3. #2
    Member Array rick21's Avatar
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    Seems like a good reason to train the cardio.

    It would suck to win a gunfight and die of a heart attack.
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    VIP Member Array 40Bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick21 View Post
    Seems like a good reason to train the cardio.

    It would suck to win a gunfight and die of a heart attack.
    The point is that it takes more to stay mentally in the game under that kind of stress than just running 5K's.
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    My rifle and pistol are tools, I am the weapon.

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    Member Array warbirds's Avatar
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    When I started shooting IDPA the "stress" of shooting would make me tunnel vision really bad to the point where I would FTN a target if it was obstructed by a no-shoot.

    I would see the no-shoot and go right past the target behind it. I did this a number of times and even shooting very slowly I struggled with tunnel vision.

    During this time I was in near pro athlete shape (as close as I would ever get anyway) and I could sustain a heart rate of 170-180 running wide open on a treadmill, back down to 150-160 to relax and then crank back up with short peaks around 190bpm.

    My body was plenty conditioned but my brain was not there yet when the bullets started flying in an environment as routine as an IDPA match.

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    What I am getting from the tip is even with the stress induced breakdown since you have trained and practice your skills to the point you operate on auto pilot you have taken your brain out of it. Therefore to perform you don't have to think about what to do next, it just happens. I see the high heart rate causing a lose of your thought process.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

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    Senior Member Array patri0t's Avatar
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    Also, for those who have never been in a live combat scenario, there is the very real possibility of someone not being able to shoot at another Human Being.
    This is not so uncommon on the battlefield or for LEOs who have never been in that position before, especially when no other LEOs are around.
    There has been a discussion of 'Choking' or 'Freezing' on this forum recently, might helpful to look it up.

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    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patri0t View Post
    Also, for those who have never been in a live combat scenario, there is the very real possibility of someone not being able to shoot at another Human Being.
    This is not so uncommon on the battlefield or for LEOs who have never been in that position before, especially when no other LEOs are around.
    There has been a discussion of 'Choking' or 'Freezing' on this forum recently, might helpful to look it up.
    Dude... what are you talking about?... You know this how?
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    Member Array rick21's Avatar
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    Agreed, but not the point of my comment.

    The point of my comment was, an almost instant increase in heart rate to 175 BPM along with a spike in BP could bring on a heart attack or stroke in an average sedentary person.

    Sometimes we get so gun focused we forget that other factors come into play. I see very good shooters huff and puff walking down range to change targets. I gotta say, pushing one of these guys to 175 BPM, well, I don't like their chances much post gunfight.
    TSiWRX likes this.

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