Recognition Primed Decision Making (RPD)

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Thread: Recognition Primed Decision Making (RPD)

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    Member Array FireNerd's Avatar
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    Recognition Primed Decision Making (RPD)

    Has anyone done a thread on this yet?
    They think they don't need firearms because they never have needed them.

    "God created man, but Samuel Colt made them equal (more or less)."

    Practice makes perfect.

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    Don't think so. If they have I missed it. So... what the heck is it and how does it apply? (I assume you're talking about the first reasonable action that comes to mind being the best course of action. If so I'd imagine it is the reasonable that will always be up for debate.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Post away. I'm interested in stories or theories where people try to properly identify home invaders, or mistakenly shoot, and why.

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    So RPD is kinda like the OODA loop, except it explains the shortcuts we make to shorten the loop, why experienced people are usually faster to arrive at a decision, and how badly the decision can go sideways within the context of time. It is especially relavant (and relavant for us on this forum) in the "thin edge of the time wedge" where time pressure is reducing processing time for option selection.

    The easiest way to describe it is as follows: Each experience or memory can be thought of as a mental image, or "slide." Given enough time for consideration, multiple options may be feasible to lead to a good outcome, and analysis can occur. As time pressure increases, actions are required prior to full analysis. Skilled operators or highly trained individuals sort through their mental slideshow and superimpose a "slide" with a successful outcome over the current situation, thus bypassing the time necessary for processing and option selection. If you've ever practiced martial arts or boxing, you know that once you reach a certain level of training you just react. Until you reach that level, you may see a punch coming and think "I should block this" just in time to have it hit you on the nose.

    So who cares?

    This appears to be the way everyone makes decisions under pressure. If a person is trained and exposed to a varieity of scenarios (experienced) the slide show is much larger and therefore much more likely to fit the given circumstances. If not well trained or not exposed (rookie) the possibility of reality and the selected action being out of alignment is much greater. This often results in "cognative dissonance," and such things as "bending the map," refusal of pilots to believe their instruments and flying into the mountain, etc.

    Highly experienced individuals can also have issues in the thin edge of the time wedge because they have so many slides that they automatically bypass new information that may be relavant (Possible explination here for the recent horrible accidents related to kids with toy guns).

    There appears to be a "butter zone" where there are just enough slides for quick decision making and not too many slides to disrupt analysis of external factors. In the fire service, the highest percentage of fatalities are typically those with 0 to 3 or greater than 10 years of experience.

    The take home message is to train, expose yourself to new experiences (Don't know about OC spray, but SABER stings, and so do stun guns!), Train, and do your best to not completely zone out and function on auto pilot, and train. Make your training as varied and realistic as possible, so the "slides" you build are more likely to overlap with reality when you need them.

    Most of us are already doing this, but it is an interesting and seemingly effective explination of why.

    As my 1st Captain was fond of saying, "You never run out of options, you just run out of time."
    Last edited by FireNerd; November 26th, 2013 at 07:24 PM. Reason: Quote from my first Captain.
    They think they don't need firearms because they never have needed them.

    "God created man, but Samuel Colt made them equal (more or less)."

    Practice makes perfect.

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    Member Array photoman6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireNerd View Post
    So RPD is kinda like the OODA loop, except it explains the shortcuts we make to shorten the loop, why experienced people are usually faster to arrive at a decision, and how badly the decision can go sideways within the context of time. It is especially relavant (and relavant for us on this forum) in the "thin edge of the time wedge" where time pressure is reducing processing time for option selection.

    The easiest way to describe it is as follows: Each experience or memory can be thought of as a mental image, or "slide." Given enough time for consideration, multiple options may be feasible to lead to a good outcome, and analysis can occur. As time pressure increases, actions are required prior to full analysis. Skilled operators or highly trained individuals sort through their mental slideshow and superimpose a "slide" with a successful outcome over the current situation, thus bypassing the time necessary for processing and option selection. If you've ever practiced martial arts or boxing, you know that once you reach a certain level of training you just react. Until you reach that level, you may see a punch coming and think "I should block this" just in time to have it hit you on the nose.

    So who cares?

    This appears to be the way everyone makes decisions under pressure. If a person is trained and exposed to a varieity of scenarios (experienced) the slide show is much larger and therefore much more likely to fit the given circumstances. If not well trained or not exposed (rookie) the possibility of reality and the selected action being out of alignment is much greater. This often results in "cognative dissonance," and such things as "bending the map," refusal of pilots to believe their instruments and flying into the mountain, etc.

    Highly experienced individuals can also have issues in the thin edge of the time wedge because they have so many slides that they automatically bypass new information that may be relavant (Possible explination here for the recent horrible accidents related to kids with toy guns).

    There appears to be a "butter zone" where there are just enough slides for quick decision making and not too many slides to disrupt analysis of external factors. In the fire service, the highest percentage of fatalities are typically those with 0 to 3 or greater than 10 years of experience.

    The take home message is to train, expose yourself to new experiences (Don't know about OC spray, but SABER stings, and so do stun guns!), Train, and do your best to not completely zone out and function on auto pilot, and train. Make your training as varied and realistic as possible, so the "slides" you build are more likely to overlap with reality when you need them.

    Most of us are already doing this, but it is an interesting and seemingly effective explination of why.

    As my 1st Captain was fond of saying, "You never run out of options, you just run out of time."
    dunno, a little too complicaated for me

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    Member Array photoman6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireNerd View Post
    So RPD is kinda like the OODA loop, except it explains the shortcuts we make to shorten the loop, why experienced people are usually faster to arrive at a decision, and how badly the decision can go sideways within the context of time. It is especially relavant (and relavant for us on this forum) in the "thin edge of the time wedge" where time pressure is reducing processing time for option selection.

    The easiest way to describe it is as follows: Each experience or memory can be thought of as a mental image, or "slide." Given enough time for consideration, multiple options may be feasible to lead to a good outcome, and analysis can occur. As time pressure increases, actions are required prior to full analysis. Skilled operators or highly trained individuals sort through their mental slideshow and superimpose a "slide" with a successful outcome over the current situation, thus bypassing the time necessary for processing and option selection. If you've ever practiced martial arts or boxing, you know that once you reach a certain level of training you just react. Until you reach that level, you may see a punch coming and think "I should block this" just in time to have it hit you on the nose.

    So who cares?

    This appears to be the way everyone makes decisions under pressure. If a person is trained and exposed to a varieity of scenarios (experienced) the slide show is much larger and therefore much more likely to fit the given circumstances. If not well trained or not exposed (rookie) the possibility of reality and the selected action being out of alignment is much greater. This often results in "cognative dissonance," and such things as "bending the map," refusal of pilots to believe their instruments and flying into the mountain, etc.

    Highly experienced individuals can also have issues in the thin edge of the time wedge because they have so many slides that they automatically bypass new information that may be relavant (Possible explination here for the recent horrible accidents related to kids with toy guns).

    There appears to be a "butter zone" where there are just enough slides for quick decision making and not too many slides to disrupt analysis of external factors. In the fire service, the highest percentage of fatalities are typically those with 0 to 3 or greater than 10 years of experience.

    The take home message is to train, expose yourself to new experiences (Don't know about OC spray, but SABER stings, and so do stun guns!), Train, and do your best to not completely zone out and function on auto pilot, and train. Make your training as varied and realistic as possible, so the "slides" you build are more likely to overlap with reality when you need them.

    Most of us are already doing this, but it is an interesting and seemingly effective explination of why.

    As my 1st Captain was fond of saying, "You never run out of options, you just run out of time."
    To paraphrase Chris Tucker :"Do you understand the words that are coming out of your mouth?"

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    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    One reason I like doing all the FOF situations scenarios I can. Best way I know of to see the tiger without doing for real.
    ShooterGranny likes this.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

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    JMB
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    Is this the idea that the more situations you are exposed to in training or real life, the faster you can transition through the OODA cycle because you have seen it before?

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    "You never run out of options, you just run out of time."------thinking about options. Could it be that sometimes thinking about thinking is over thinking?
    "I think therefore I hesitate."

    Just being a smart***
    blitzburgh likes this.
    Oh yeh? Well this was sent from the scary black electrical box under my desk, so there!
    "It aint how good you shoot, it's how cool you look doing it." [Fred Sayer 1994]
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    Quote Originally Posted by N.M. Edmands View Post
    "You never run out of options, you just run out of time."------thinking about options. Could it be that sometimes thinking about thinking is over thinking?
    "I think therefore I hesitate."
    It seems the two most common lockups (freeze in an active situation) that occur are 1. No slide present and have to fake it/make it up on the fly or 2. Too many slides and have to find the right one. More experienced people can fall into #2, which usually is quickly remedied when the "correct" slide is found.

    One implication of this is to make training and drills broadly applicable. Overtraining and having too many potential actions can lead to lockup #2.

    To answer Badger--

    If you constantly train to deal with a threat in the house, you have created a "slide" that you default to under stress. When you see something similar in your home situation, you superimpose that mental image (slide) from your training. You may not even see the face of the person because you are operating on autopilot. This is how honest people make honest mistakes.

    I personally try to drill to avoid this by adding a "target identification" beat to my training. I have also found that I am often faster on the clock when I try to slow down somewhat.

    Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast......
    ShooterGranny likes this.
    They think they don't need firearms because they never have needed them.

    "God created man, but Samuel Colt made them equal (more or less)."

    Practice makes perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    Is this the idea that the more situations you are exposed to in training or real life, the faster you can transition through the OODA cycle because you have seen it before?
    Essentially, yes, but with the caveat that overtraining can slow you down too. I don't know if LEO gets this training, but we have it in spades for the fire service on how to handle and train for dynamic situations and avoid vaporlock.
    Last edited by FireNerd; November 27th, 2013 at 12:13 PM. Reason: clarifying
    They think they don't need firearms because they never have needed them.

    "God created man, but Samuel Colt made them equal (more or less)."

    Practice makes perfect.

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    JMB
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireNerd View Post
    Essentially, yes, but with the caveat that overtraining can slow you down too. I don't know if LEO gets this training, but we have it in spades for the fire service on how to handle and train for dynamic situations and avoid vaporlock.
    Over trained huh...can't imagine that.
    kaikane0812 likes this.

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    VIP Member Array blitzburgh's Avatar
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    Training to combat the "side effects" of over-training. Interesting.
    "Rebellion against tyrants is obedience to God." - Benjamin Franklin
    "Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn." - C.S. Lewis

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    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    Over trained huh...can't imagine that.
    It not the training, it's the mindset. Two mindset issues that I see associated with lots of training are:

    1. Overconfidence
    2. Complacency

    Humility (a realistic appraisal of one's abilities/vulnerabilities) can mitigate complacency and overconfidence


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "My problem with life is not that it is rational nor that it is irrational, but that it is almost rational." - G.K. Chesterton

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    Member Array FireNerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blitzburgh View Post
    Training to combat the "side effects" of over-training. Interesting.
    We use it to tailor our training to combat the side effects of over-training, but essentially yes.
    They think they don't need firearms because they never have needed them.

    "God created man, but Samuel Colt made them equal (more or less)."

    Practice makes perfect.

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