How much training do professionals do?

This is a discussion on How much training do professionals do? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; If you had to put a weekly # on the amount of hours spent on training that LEO has or should have, and also competitive ...

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Thread: How much training do professionals do?

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    Member Array american23's Avatar
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    Question How much training do professionals do?

    If you had to put a weekly # on the amount of hours spent on training that LEO has or should have, and also competitive shooters...what would it be? I'm just curious as to the average. I have a feeling I don't train nearly enough...

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    Member Array chasbo00's Avatar
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    Competitive shooters spend a great deal of time practicing, and most do a lot of dry fire practice too including; drawing, reloading, multiple target transitions and moving. Dedicated competition shooters' dry fire practice usually does not entail dropping the hammer or striker except for the first shot, they are working on other skills besides trigger manipulation. They also live fire a lot both in practice and matches. Most of the competition shooters I know shoot over 12,000 rounds per year, some a whole lot more. Hours per week varies with match season and matches, but I'd say anywhere from 8 hours on the average up to 40 hours or more prepping for a major match, including dry fire.

    Here is an example of a world class shooter doing some dry fire practice:


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    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    LEO after academy, dont really practice that much on the whole unless they just happen to be gun folk. If they can qualify and do required shooting thru the year thats about all most will do. Not all but an awfully lot of them.
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    Member Array jake01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost1958 View Post
    LEO after academy, dont really practice that much on the whole unless they just happen to be gun folk. If they can qualify and do required shooting thru the year thats about all most will do. Not all but an awfully lot of them.
    Tell me about it...I have 5 LE friends and when we go to the range whoever shoots the worst buys lunch...lets just say I have never bought. Its scary.
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    Senior Member Array Bigsteve113's Avatar
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    It's shocking how many of my LEO peers that only shoot their firearms on qualification day. It's like they haven't realized that it could save their life one day. But, the truth is a large part of LEO's are simply not interested in firearms/shooting. The only reason many of them shoot/train at all is because we (administration) makes ' em.

    Many, on the other hand, train their butts off. They train on their own. They train in groups. They suck up every class that we can afford to send them to. That's the ones I want to go through the "hot" doors with.

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    VIP Member Array Phaedrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    Competitive shooters spend a great deal of time practicing, and most do a lot of dry fire practice too including; drawing, reloading, multiple target transitions and moving. Dedicated competition shooters' dry fire practice usually does not entail dropping the hammer or striker except for the first shot, they are working on other skills besides trigger manipulation. They also live fire a lot both in practice and matches. Most of the competition shooters I know shoot over 12,000 rounds per year, some a whole lot more. Hours per week varies with match season and matches, but I'd say anywhere from 8 hours on the average up to 40 hours or more prepping for a major match, including dry fire.

    Here is an example of a world class shooter doing some dry fire practice:

    That's pretty cool! I practice in a similar manner but not as fast and smooth!
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    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    Here is an example of a world class shooter doing some dry fire practice:
    Cool, I want to be him when I grow up
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    Distinguished Member Array Wunderneun's Avatar
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    Illinois' LEO firearms course is 40 hours of combined range and classroom time. 750 pistol rounds and around 12 or 15 shotgun rounds are fired. Qualifying is (or was during my time) 50 rounds at distances up to 25 yards.

    Anyone who hold this 40 hour MFT certificate is exempt from Illinois' CCW training.
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    Member Array chandlerusm's Avatar
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    How much training do professionals do?

    I've been a competitive IPSC shooter in the past, and a LEO for 30+ years... And a firearms instructor for ten of those.

    When I was shooting competitively, I shot a LOT. Like 20,000 rounds the year I went to Nationals. I also did dry fire work, holster work, reload drills, etc. every day I didn't go to the range and live fire.

    Today I try to go to the range about once a month and do some dry fire work every week. Most cops go when they are sent. Some go whenever they can.

    State LEO qualifications are usually the MINIMUM standard for carrying a weapon in public safely. Like CCW permitees, some will be satisfied with the required minimum, some will want to be more than barely competent.


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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Guys, you have to understand that there are other, way more involved training requirements to LE than firearms. And this includes continuing education requirements.
    Don't be fooled by shooting skills on a paper target. It all equalizes when the shtf.
    Things are different when you carry because you have to, and not because you just want to.
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    Senior Member Array Gaius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wunderneun View Post
    Illinois' LEO firearms course is 40 hours of combined range and classroom time. 750 pistol rounds and around 12 or 15 shotgun rounds are fired. Qualifying is (or was during my time) 50 rounds at distances up to 25 yards.

    Anyone who hold this 40 hour MFT certificate is exempt from Illinois' CCW training.
    But I guess the real question of the OP was more along the lines of how often do these guys practice? Unless they are gun people to begin with, in Chicago, not much. Specifically:

    Chicago Police Annual Pistol Qualification Requirements

    Q. What is the course of fire?
A. You will shoot a total of 30 rounds for each opportunity: 12 rounds from the five yard line; 12 rounds from the seven yard line; and 6 rounds from the fifteen yard line. In order to qualify, you must place 21 hits out of 30 rounds within the 8 1/2 x 14 target area - 70% proficiency.

    So 30 shots once a year, and feel free to completely miss 9 of the 30. Also note all you have to do is hit the paper, no scoring appears to be required.
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    Senior Member Array kb2wji's Avatar
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    I spend about an hour per week on the range. Some weeks I don't go, some weeks I stay longer. Round count is typically low (50-100 or so) because I do a bunch of stoppage drills and dummy round drills.

    In my opinion you should put an equal amount of time in working on stoppage / jams / malfunction drills as you do actually shooting. Same goes for unholstering / reholstering. Some people do, some people don't

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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    The problem with training is; cost and time. Most officers don't have that much of either. That is why we are working on getting the OCAT System to catch on. You can practice at home for around a penny for a trigger pull. It takes that basic dry fire training, ad the laser and the ability to track that laser and you have your own virtual range. Can really improve those days when you do get out to the range.
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    When I was shooting competitively in the 1990's and early 2000's I would shoot 8-10K per year plus 250-300 per match which was 2X per month. In the last 4 years I have taken 4 Gun Fighting courses that had round counts into 600-800 for the weekend. Fortunately I reload and the cost has been minimal to shoot. I now concentrate in CCW and shooting on a 360 degree range at least 4 times a year. Totally different disciplines and I have to remember which one I am in. In the process I am shooting less competitively than before and concentrate on Social Gun Fighting skills. I still carry a B Class Limited USPSA Classification card and can likely hold my own in C class. There is no substitute for live fire training as long as you do not do 30 reps of the same drill.
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