Sighted Fire - What Do You See?

This is a discussion on Sighted Fire - What Do You See? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Thought I'd query the members here to see what you actually see before, during and after the shot when using sighted fire? This is something ...

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Thread: Sighted Fire - What Do You See?

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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Sighted Fire - What Do You See?

    Thought I'd query the members here to see what you actually see before, during and after the shot when using sighted fire? This is something I have had to improve over the last few years especially when firing strings longer than two rounds rapid fire.

    I would also like to hear what techniques, if any, you employ to increase speed while maintaining accuracy.

    Thanks!

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    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    Crisp, clear front sight, blurry target, blurry rear sight.
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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badey View Post
    Crisp, clear front sight, blurry target, blurry rear sight.
    Thanks, I edited the OP to include "before, during and after the shot"

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    Member Array chasbo00's Avatar
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    You want to see the front sight lift and then fall back into the rear sight notch as you break the next shot. Being able to do this very quickly takes practice and requires solid fundamentals. The Bill Drill is a way to measure how effectively you can do it.
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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    You want to see the front sight lift and then fall back into the rear sight notch as you break the next shot. Being able to do this very quickly takes practice and requires solid fundamentals. The Bill Drill is a way to measure how effectively you can do it.
    I don't know the Bill Drill but I have used cadence drills and 5-10 rnd strings of fire.

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    Member Array chasbo00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    I don't know the Bill Drill but I have used cadence drills and 5-10 rnd strings of fire.
    Bill Drill | Shooting Illustrated
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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    I guess you could say that was what I was I was doing (sort of) but slower in the beginning. No IPSC target though just a NRA B8.

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    Member Array chasbo00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    I guess you could say that was what I was I was doing (sort of) but slower in the beginning. No IPSC target though just a NRA B8.
    An IPSC metric target's A zone is a very slightly less than 6 inches wide and about 11 inches long. If you want to measure yourself against some standard Bill Drill benchmarks you can easily modify a standard 8.5 x 11 inch piece of paper by cutting off 2.5 inches lengthwise to match the A zone of an IPSC metric target.

    Some folks like to use only the upper half of the IPSC A zone (torso high center of mass) and won't count any hits in the lower half of the A zone.

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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    An IPSC metric target's A zone is a very slightly less than 6 inches wide and about 11 inches long. If you want to measure yourself against some standard Bill Drill benchmarks you can easily modify a standard 8.5 x 11 inch piece of paper by cutting off 2.5 inches lengthwise to match the A zone of an IPSC metric target.

    Some folks like to use only the upper half of the IPSC A zone (torso high center of mass) and won't count any hits in the lower half of the A zone.
    Thanks, I think I'll stick with the B8, I believe the bullseye is 5.5".

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    Senior Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasbo00 View Post
    You want to see the front sight lift and then fall back into the rear sight notch as you break the next shot. Being able to do this very quickly takes practice and requires solid fundamentals. The Bill Drill is a way to measure how effectively you can do it.
    Yep, the Bill Drill.

    I learned about this for the first time towards the end of my first year of shooting, but it wasn't until about a year and a half in that I finally realized its importance, thanks to an instructor who took the extra time to really explain it.
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    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    Thanks, I edited the OP to include "before, during and after the shot"
    Ok. Before the shot, I see a clear target. I push the gun into my line of sight and generally see the top of the slide first (the part between the back of the barrel and the front sight). I focus on the front sight and press the trigger.

    As the shot breaks, I lose the sight picture and generally just see a blur of motion. I keep my focus on where the front sight should settle again after the slide cycles.

    Then I repeat until I reach the desired number of shots.

    Occasionally, when I am rusty, before the shot, I will see and initially focus on the rear sight/back of the slide first. I find that it takes me longer to focus clearly on the front sight when that happens.
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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    Thought I'd query the members here to see what you actually see before, during and after the shot when using sighted fire? This is something I have had to improve over the last few years especially when firing strings longer than two rounds rapid fire.

    I would also like to hear what techniques, if any, you employ to increase speed while maintaining accuracy.

    Thanks!
    Hard target focus, soft front sight focus.

    Accuracy is good. Proper fundamentals with the handgun are vital for this type of shooting IMO. So that is what I focus on..
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    I used to focus almost entirely on the front sight. Now for shooting within 7 meters I'm doing a ton of practice at shooting without using the sights at all. Both eyes open point and shoot. I'm nearly as accurate as with the sights. I can empty my weapon and everything will be within an 8 inch circle.

    My kids got me a SIRT gun (laser practice tool that is like a glock 17) and I use it everyday. I was impressed at how well the practice carried over to my performance with my real 19 and 26. Plus with the SIRT I can practice shooting on the move and shooting multiple targets at multiple positions. They seem to frown on shooting behind and to your side at the range.
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    Senior Member Array JMB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farsidefan1 View Post
    I used to focus almost entirely on the front sight. Now for shooting within 7 meters I'm doing a ton of practice at shooting without using the sights at all. Both eyes open point and shoot. I'm nearly as accurate as with the sights. I can empty my weapon and everything will be within an 8 inch circle.

    My kids got me a SIRT gun (laser practice tool that is like a glock 17) and I use it everyday. I was impressed at how well the practice carried over to my performance with my real 19 and 26. Plus with the SIRT I can practice shooting on the move and shooting multiple targets at multiple positions. They seem to frown on shooting behind and to your side at the range.
    Good info but we're discussing sighted fire for this thread.

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    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    While at most all combat distances a CCer will find themselves in I do not use sights but rather am focused on target and point shoot. I think the same would be true for those who use sights. When facing a threat your natural instinct will be the lock onto the threat, not your sights. So learn to focus on target and look through your sight rather than at them. Most of the top competition shooters use this type of focus.

    In a fight for your life you need to be looking at and for the threats around you not a hard focus on you front sight.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

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