The "Need for Speed" in Concealed Carry Magazine

This is a discussion on The "Need for Speed" in Concealed Carry Magazine within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; On April 6th Concealed Carry Magazine will carry an article by Bruce Eimer on the Integrated Threat Focused Training Systems [ ITFTS ] training he ...

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Thread: The "Need for Speed" in Concealed Carry Magazine

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    The "Need for Speed" in Concealed Carry Magazine

    On April 6th Concealed Carry Magazine will carry an article by Bruce Eimer on the Integrated Threat Focused Training Systems [ ITFTS ] training he received while out here in the Az desert.

    It concentrates on the drawstroke, mindset and subsequent skills to take back the initiative while engaging an adversary/adversaries with a handgun which ITFTS trains others in across the country as well as here in Az.

    The PDF article is too large to attach here for this site, but you can view the pdf if you are a member of either of these sites:

    http://www.threatfocused.com/forums/...read.php?t=805

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=267202

    IFTS training includes much more than this reporters small but very important aspect of self defense with a firearm. In fact, the training has been taken from a mindset of self defense to one of self offense when one finds the need to use a handgun or rifle/carbine.

    Reacting and then immediately taking back the initial initiative of an aggressor/attacker is something that requires the subconscious threat focused skills learned in the ITFTS program and the proper mindset to utilize them to maximum benefit.

    To be able to survive and go home at the end of the day.

    Brownie
    Last edited by AzQkr; April 4th, 2007 at 12:03 AM.
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

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    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    I have to take some issue with this article, not so much for what it says, but for what it doesn't say. There's absolutely no mention of moving when you draw. If you're in a situation where you're trying to get hits on the BG before he hits you, moving while drawing is a must!

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    Blackeagle;

    You have to walk before you can run

    The author did plenty of running and shooting while out here for 4 days. His drawstroke, as he mentions, needed a lot of work first to make it automatic and subconscious.

    One step at a time sir, one step at a time. Progressions of skills starting from the basics, and each then adding another layer to the skills levels. The author wrote only of a small part of the training he received. He didn't even mention the various threat focused skills.

    The article is not all inclusive, nor was it meant to be. The theme being "the need for speed" where the drawstroke is concerned, nothing more or less. If you are going to take issue with what was not said in the article, you'll have a lot of issues, as this one theme he wrote about covered a very small part of the program in the four days here. It would be impossible to write an article limited to a certain number of words and cover the course in it's entirety, nor did he try to.

    edited to add:

    If you're in a situation where you're trying to get hits on the BG before he hits you, moving while drawing is a must!

    It's not always a must. There are times when you can stand and deliver as you are ahead of the guys actions by situational awareness and not so far behind as you might be at other times. Many of the worlds best 20th century real world gunfighters, names like Bill Jordan, Jelly Bryce, Chic Gaylord, etc stood and delivered with well practiced speed of draws, sometimes against men who had the drop on them. Yet their practiced speed of their draws won them life and the aggressors, death, at the hands of these men who knew the value of "The need for speed".

    Each has their time and place in the SD of ones person. Movement, for the sake of movement itself, is not always the wisest choice.

    Brownie
    Last edited by AzQkr; April 4th, 2007 at 01:44 AM.
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

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    Here's the full review of the authors experiences of the training he received:

    I’m 53, I have a host of physical challenges that limit my speed, endurance, flexibility and range of motion, and I have been studying the art of the defensive handgun for six years. I have been to numerous shooting schools, as when I take up an interest, I usually get into it obsessively. The only thing is—all that instruction from different world-renowned instructors with different shooting systems has mixed me up and made me slower than my natural instinctive abilities could have allowed me to shoot. I know this because I spent two days in class with Brownie and 7677 in Easton, PA in May, 2006, and I just spent three full days with Brownie at his home in the Arizona desert.

    The need for speed:
    Brownie, in his inimitable style re-awakened me to the realities of the defensive handgun. You are going to only need to use it if someone is trying to kill you! You are going to have seconds to get bullets onto the COM of your attacker. The facts are that in a fight, the fastest one to get hits on the other normally is going to win! Period. End of story. This means that when we train to fight with a gun (that’s why we should be carrying a gun—to have it if we need it in a fight for our life), we need to keep the above truth in mind. Well . . . when you train with Brownie, he does not let you forget it. Whatever slows you down WILL LIKELY get you killed in a fight for your life! Brownie does not only remind you of the need for speed, he helps you acquire it.

    What I learned to do in the desert:
    Brownie took care of everything. He picked me up at the airport, and he and his lovely wife, Val, made me a guest in their home. With all my essential biological needs well met (food, shelter, good sleep, and comfort), we spent three full days in the desert training. I also got to meet several very interesting real Western characters whom you don’t want to mess with.

    We spent the first two solid days on pistol, expending over 2000 rounds of 9mm from my Glock 26 and Glock 19. First Brownie had to clarify my confusion over my convoluted and overly complicated draw stroke (i.e., presentation from the holster), and my stance and grip. Back to basics! A simple handshake will do for the draw—“Hi, how are you?” (one fluid motion).

    When I think about it, I have been doing this all my life. It’s deep within my muscle memory. Boy, how is it possible that it got so complicated? I came out here to clarify my confusion. Mission accomplished!

    On to more basic learning:
    There is a basic repertoire of skills that comprise the defensive handgun, integrated threat focused gun fighting system that Brownie and his training partner 7677 teach. We promptly proceeded to cover these skills and we stayed with them until both Brownie and I felt that I had them down enough to be able to go home with them subconsciously ingrained. They do have to be subconscious. You cannot afford the time to have to think about them when someone is threatening your life! You have to go. You have to move!

    Surviving a violent attack requires ingrained, subconsciously imprinted, automatically deployable fighting skills. If you have to think about it, you will die thinking. Brownie takes defensive handgun training to this level. He gave me a platform of skills and concepts from which to practice my ability to survive with a handgun in a violent confrontation. I was shown how to use my natural ability to draw and shoot—putting multiple rounds with speed on the COM of my target—in this case, paper silhouettes or steel plates. The steel dimensions were 16 inches by 11 inches—the size of the chest area of a normal humanoid. I practiced the drills that I can practice on a square indoor range at home so that I can improve my speed and accuracy at hitting COM.

    Shooting from the hip (EU-ED) is for when you are close in and there is no time to draw to three quarter or full extension, or acquire a two-handed grip. You have already been drawn down on, or are being charged by an attacker equipped with a blunt impact or edged weapon.

    The skills flow into each other. EU-ED into Hammer (close in) when your COM shots didn’t do the job, and the Zipper to stop your attacker with a zipper of bullets up his middle. All of these drills can be practiced on an indoor range. If you are fortunate enough to shoot on an outdoor range, you can do these drills while moving. It is no different. You maintain your threat focus and your reference point (the end of the barrel/slide/front sight) in your peripheral vision. You look over your reference point at your intended point of impact. You can move to the left, the right, and diagonally backwards and forwards.
    I practiced the hammer, two-handed QK, closing the distance on my target as I barraged my target/adversary with a wall of bullets. Brownie coins these skills and mindset “self-offense”. In contrast to most defensive handgunning systems that emphasize movement to cover and maximizing distance from your adversary, the Integrated Threat Focused Training System emphasizes at times that closing the distance with your adversary is in fact a valid tactic. You want to distract, interrupt and disable your adversary fast.

    I was taught two-handed QK from various distances and how to draw into two-handed QK and close the distance. I experienced first hand that I can do it. I made the steel plates sing hits (ding, ding, ding . . . ) from various distances—stationary and moving.

    The draw/presentation of the handgun from the holster is so easy, why make it complicated? It’s as simple as “Hi. How are you?” Surprise!!! And with the proper grip/hold, trigger control, and using your reference point (your natural pointing and visual ability), you are rewarded with hits on target.

    Brownie made it easy:
    Brownie does not just talk the talk. He walks the walk! I shot over 2000 rounds of 9mm handgun in 2 days. With Brownie, you shoot and shoot and then some. Brownie is a great instructor. He watches you closely and helps you get it down. He helps you adjust your technique so you get results (i.e., ding, ding, ding . . .). No unnecessary movements! No unnecessary theory or talking. If I, with all my physical challenges, can do it, most everyone can.

    Brownie helped me find my way, which is what I came to him for. His focus and attention on the range is unwavering. He notices everything and gives you continual corrective feedback.

    Not only hits count. Hits without speed are like driving without a well functioning transmission, or like driving a 2 cylinder car cross country. You have to get the gun out fast on the target and start getting bullets on the person who is trying to kill you before you take the hits. It is all about getting right into the bad guy’s reactionary curve and beating him to the punch—like a winning boxer.

    I came home with practical and practicable skills:
    EU-ED; Hammer; Zipper; Drawing from the holster into two-handed QK from various distances; Being mindful of my shooting platform—grip, trigger control, reference point.

    As an added bonus, we did QK rifle. One night Brownie taught me QK rifle on his back porch in the desert with a Daisy Red Ryder BB Rifle. Within 10 minutes, I was hitting little pebbles in the ground and coins out of the air. In many ways, QK rifle is easier than QK pistol.

    On our last day together, we went out deep into the desert to the old Silver King Mine. We met a great guy named “Hawk” and his wife “Di” who take care of the place. We then went out into a wash in a canyon and with an SKS 7.62x39, shot QK rifle. Using the “snap technique”, I learned how to pick out targets (boulders and bushes) in the canyon (25 to 350 yards) and snap the SKS up onto the target and immediately fire using my reference point.

    The “trick” is to NOT stop and think about it BEFORE you fire. Maintaining a solid and consistent cheek weld on the stock and consistent trigger control, I discovered I could use my natural ability to see my target, snap the rifle up on target, see the target and my reference point in my peripheral vision, and looking over the gun, hit my target. The reference point remains the same at almost all distances in rifle QK. The trick is not to over think, but let your mind and muscle memory do its thing.

    “Hawk” demonstrated how fast he could draw his single action six shooter from a cowboy hip holster and put lead on his target. Brownie demonstrated all the skills he taught me and more. You must assume in a fight that you are up against a very dangerous man. You can not underestimate someone who is trying to kill you. You need these skills to survive and stay alive. Threat focused handgun is all about fighting with a gun, not about competition shooting. The competition is for your life. Brownie opened my eyes to reality. This is real world survival.

    The draw from the holster is as simple as “Hi, How are you?”. It is a one-two motion. 1. scoop and clap. 2. drive the gun to the target. Why make it complicated? How many step does it take to reach for a glass of water or point to something? Let your mind naturally do what it knows how to do to direct your body. Don’t clutter it.

    The Virtues of Practice: Practice the way you are going to fight to win.

    This was great training. I will have a lot to practice.

    Thank you Brownie!

    --- Bruce Eimer

    Notice the bolded text mentioning-----MOVEMENT with all these skills within the ITFTS course.

    Brownie
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

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