Point Shooting Progressions - September 8-9 2007 - Reno Nevada

Point Shooting Progressions - September 8-9 2007 - Reno Nevada

This is a discussion on Point Shooting Progressions - September 8-9 2007 - Reno Nevada within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; September 8-9, 2007 Point Shooting Progressions Reno Nevada Force on force training has proven beyond any arguement that the traditional shooting range methods are simply ...

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Thread: Point Shooting Progressions - September 8-9 2007 - Reno Nevada

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Point Shooting Progressions - September 8-9 2007 - Reno Nevada

    September 8-9, 2007
    Point Shooting Progressions
    Reno Nevada

    Force on force training has proven beyond any arguement that the traditional shooting range methods are simply not suitable for reactive gunfighting. In this course, Suarez International Specialist Instructor Roger Phillips will teach you the "Fight Continuum". Roger has studied extensively with Suarez International. He has also researched virtually every threat focused shooting system for many years. This course distills it all into one well thought out and extremely applicable system that dovetails neatly into the regular Close Range Gunfighting matrix, presenting the full aspect of the integration of sighted and unsighted fire at CQB distances.



    Duration: 2 days 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
    Ammunition: Approximately 1500 rounds (Minimum)
    Requirements: Pistol, Carry Holster, 3 Magazines and Magazine Pouch, Range Safety Gear
    Instructor: Roger Phillips
    Where: Washoe County Regional Shooting Center


    $350.00 ENROLL HERE
    Last edited by Sweatnbullets; May 26th, 2007 at 02:05 PM.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Point Shooting Progressions Course Overview

    The “Fight Continuum” React as you need to react, see what you need to see, and move as you need to move.

    This course comes directly out of my experience in Gabe’s “Interactive Gun Fighting” course. Immediately after the course I went out looking to train with the very best point shooters in the country. This course is a direct link to my findings while training with Gabe, 7677, and Matt Temkin. This course is designed to make a shooter the very best that they can be in regards to point shooting with dynamic movement. It is designed to make the shooter more well rounded and completely versatile inside what is now being called “The Fight Continuum.” After this course you will be able to use your hand/eye coordination to make combat accurate hit from any angle, from any position, throughout your one and two handed draw stroke, with whatever movement is necessary. This course is designed to fill in the gaps in prior sighted fire training so that the shooter can seamlessly integrate sighted and unsighted fire into one “simply shooting” concept.


    Precision sighted fire

    Flash sight picture shooting

    Ten elements to threat focused shooting

    Alternative line of sight sighting methods

    Quick fire

    Introduction and benefits of below line of sight point shooting

    Mid point of drawstroke point shooting

    Count Three point shooting

    Zippering throughout the two handed drawstroke, integration of sighted fire

    Focal transition drills

    Failure to stop drill

    Two handed multiples at appropriate distances with appropriate extension, integration of sighted fire

    Introduction and benefits of one handed point shooting

    Completley versatile drawstroke, elimination of stance dependence, and the use of the visual centerline

    Line of sight point shooting (FSA point shoulder)

    One handed below line of sight point shooting

    FSA three quarter hip

    FSA half hip

    Elbow up/ Elbow down

    Progression of elbow up/Elbow down

    One handed zipper, integration of sighted fire

    Focal transition drills

    Failure to stop drill

    One handed multiples at appropriate distances with appropriated extension, integration of sighted fire

    Introduction to controlled movement and sighted fire

    Fluid Situational Response

    Get the heck out of Dodge movement and the use of cover with sighted fire

    Get out of the “Kill Zone” drawstroke

    Four elements of accurate shooting with dynamic movement

    Movement must have “purpose” lecture

    Preparation for movement to “sectors”

    Dynamic movement while fighting in all directions from varying distances with varying extention

    Introduction to feints, jukes, cutbacks, and elliptical movement

    Put it all together “S” drills

    Plus a lot more……1500 rounds minimum…..if you want to shoot more, bring more!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    This course is filling up pretty quickly....pretty early. Just a heads up for those that are waiting for the last minute.

    I guess Reno opens up a good portion of California for a lot of people.

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    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    The time needs to be changed on this due to the range's operating hours. The course will run from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

    Sorry for the inconvience, Roger Phillips

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    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    This course is two weeks out and there are still some spots open.

    Here is a review of the night course that I ran in Boulder City a couple of weekends ago.
    **************************************************

    Along with Alex I recently took the “Progressions of Point Shooting and Fighting at Night” class with Roger Phillips and I would like to take a moment to thank Roger for his dedication to the art and his insightful instruction.

    We began the class with open minds and the 100 plus degree heat of the Nevada desert. We began the class with the usual safety lecture and an explanation of the development of the material.

    Once on the range we started off with the basic essentials of point shooting in a building block approach where one skill led into the next and one drill led to a more advanced drill which programmed the “software” without getting hung up on the hardware.

    The class was designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of point shooting and progressing them from using physical references to visual references and finally mental indexing.

    We ran a lot of drills that progressed from simple to more complex adding distance, speed of movement, increasing trigger speeds, multiple targets, shoot don’t shoot, hostage situations, and managing barricades in daylight, ambient light, and very little light with and without the use of flashlights. The drills were purposely and appropriately designed to train the software and as Roger likes to point out: “Train the software and the hardware will follow.”

    Most of the drills were designed around dynamic movement from 2 yards away from the threat to seven yards. We would begin up close and work back to seven, but we also took it back to 25 yards in one drill to show us how distance changes speed both with footwork and working the trigger. We pushed the limits at every distance to illustrate where the limitations are. To my surprise by the end of day one I could make some hits at 25 yards on the move though they weren’t as consistent as the seven yard shots (and closer). In the drills we learned to change the heights of our shots back and forth from the chest to head, we did zippering from the quarter and half hip, and we learned to shoot moving dynamically to the forward oblique, lateral angles, and rearward oblique, we moved with sharp and elliptical movement patterns with multiple angle changes against multiple targets, and drawing from concealment to quick fire from every conceivable position and orientation to the threat.

    As the sun was going down behind the mountains we performed many of the previous drills using ambient light as well as a few new drills.

    After dinner which consisted of what Roger referred to as steak and fancy European sausage which was really beef jerky and Vienna sausages with trail mix on the side, it got dark, real dark and we were treated with a wonderful display of the Perseids meteor shower against a crisp backdrop of clear skies and the New Moon (which means no moon at all).

    After dinner we repeated some earlier drills and worked on flashlight techniques including (but not limited to) the FBI, Gabes modified Harry’s, floating light, strobing, using the chin reference which I found worked the best for me when shooting with dynamic movement, as well as other techniques and strategies for keeping your exact whereabouts unknown to the threat until you have identified him, as much as you can when you are a shinning a light in the darkness.

    On day two which was much hotter than day one the pace was a little slower but the drills were more intensive and the footwork and trigger work being much faster. No longer were we using physical reference points (seeing the gun or indexing it on a fixed point on the body) it was all visual reference points from here on out (focusing on the target)…the transformation had subconsciously taken place. At this point the mind is still seeing “what it needs to see” in other words the mind knows where the gun is but consciously you no longer see the gun. The focus point is with the eyes focused on the spot where you want to put your rounds.

    By the second day out hit placements were becoming very consistent without consciously thinking about the “technique”. The training is concept based not technique based and it seams to work very well.

    We shot with and without flashlights in various situations and distances from the threat and in many drills we would identify the threat with the flashlight and disengage the light before sending bursts of lead down towards the targets. To my dismay even though the targets were nearly invisible the hits were consistently good hits. I think this was done to drive home the confidence of owning the new skill-set.

    Point shooting doesn’t replace sighted fire it is in addition to it for “reactive” situations. To illustrate this, in one drill which we did against a hostage taker where there was only a small window in which to shoot precise shots without hitting the hostage using the sights was advantageous at the further distances of 7 yards and beyond but at the closer distances point shooting still worked well while on the move even from awkward positions. This illiterates that there is still a time and place for sighted fire which Roger is always quick to point out but there is certainly a place for point shooting especially when urgency, proximity, and movement are involved.

    Honestly the course is still a blur to me because of the amount of material covered and the rapid pace of the class but suffice it to say the drills are designed to train the software and not the hardware and it really didn’t take a lot of repetitions to become proficient… though there is still plenty of room for improvement. I can say by the end of the course the final product came together quit nicely. We were hitting the target with good hits on the move with little input from our conscious minds. As Alex said “to be one with the gun” and as Roger said “the gun is just an extension of the mind”.

    A word of warning though, when Roger says bring 1200 rounds minimum… bring more, I shot at least 1500rds but I could have easily shot 2000 in this class.

    A little about Roger, Roger’s laid back personality, down to earth accessibility, and his uncanny ability to explain in ordinary terms the process of his methods meshed well with my learning style and helped me to understand in better detail what was going on. Roger is a very modest guy without an arrogant bone in his body and he always gave credit where credit was due. I thought Roger did a good job and I would definitely recommend training with him and I certainly hope to do so again in the future.

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