Building clearing and you....

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Thread: Building clearing and you....

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array A1C Lickey's Avatar
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    Building clearing and you....

    Sorry guys this is kind of long.

    Over the last year two events have made me realize that I need to learn more about clearing buildings. Now believe me I'm not trying to go mall ninja, and I know that you really shouldn't be clearing anything by yourself, but sometimes things happen.
    The first incident happened in October. We had just moved into a new house and my buddy had just gotten back from the desert two days before. He was staying with us while he found a place to stay and basically to get out of the dorms. I went out to pick up some things from Wal-Mart and Home Depot and when I came back I saw my wife's car in the driveway and the door open. After calling out my wife's name several times I proceeded to clear my house. I was standing in my front hall when they came home. Seems they had made a quick run for some Cold Stone ice cream. Seems they had taken his car, and that was the day we found out that the catch on our front door was broken. Believe me, that got fixed quickly.
    Second incident occurred a few nights ago. I'm a member of the base READY team and periodically do a rotation TDY with Security Forces. I've been working midshift and was out on a mounted perimeter patrol with a partner when we came upon an unsecured building with evidence of vandalism and a break-in. Unfotunately we recently had a violent incident with a homeless indivual living in an outlying building. We called it in, and were forced to clear the building because reinforcement was not available for the forceable future (there was an incident on the other side of base). We established a 360 and then proceeded to clear the building, with my partner WAY behind me.

    When I was trained we went over the basics of clearing a building, and I recently got to watch Goodyear SAU practice in base housing (and believe me, I learned quite a bit). Since formal training at a school or academy is out of the question for the time being (both because of cost and inability to leave) I was hoping that someone would have a book, DVD, or local class that they could recommend to build on the basics.
    Thanks.
    TSgt. Lickey

    It takes a college degree to break'em;
    and a high school education to fix'em!

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    A1c since your doing this .mil might i suggest that you start contacting local LE agencys and see if you can piggy back , or audit some of thier in service training on subjects like this . Many of them will most likely be receptive to that i suspect since it wont cost anything on their training budget .

    Edited to add :

    Depending on the dept. they may not want to issue any certificate , or log you as haveing been trained due to liability issues with certifying the skills of non dept personnel. It still should give you a better skill set at minimal to no cost to yourself .
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Gabe Suarez has a book and a DVD. They are both called "The Tactical Advantage" and can be found here.

    http://www.onesourcetactical.com/ind...ory=138&Page=2

    Yes, Gabe is a friend of mine and I am an instructor for Suarez International, but that is not why I post this. I have taken three FOF course with Gabe, the first one was a "clearing FOF course. " His tactics and clearing skills were far and beyond anyone elses that I have ever trained with. I have taken nearly 20 courses on clearing and his course was hands down the best......no comparison!

    I can also vouch for the book....it is superb, but slightly dated! I have not seen the video, but there is no doubt in my mind that the content is going to be top notch.

  5. #4
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    SSgt. Lickey-

    I don't give this info out very often, however I will give you an outline of what you should be training on for building clearing if you need further info contact me by e-mail,

    PTTA SWAT BASIC

    Building Clearing

    Though it would seem that there are only afew ways of entering a door or securing a room. Building Clearing is a confusing art.

    SINCE THE BEGINNING DEPENDS ON WHERE YOU ARE WHEN YOU START. THE BEGINNING OF CLEARING A BUILDING STARTS WITH THE OUTER PERIMETER.

    THE STEPS TO CLEARING A BUILDING SUCCESSFULLY BEGINS WITH A PROPER APPROACH. PROPER MOVEMENT FROM ADJACENT BUILDINGS OR OBJECTS TO THE TARGET BUILDING, ARE ESSENTIAL TO YOUR PRIMARY MISSION OF JUST GETTING THERE UNDETECTED. INDIVIDUAL OR TEAM MOVEMENT MUST BE DONE WITH STEALTH AND SECURITY. KNOWING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TACTICS FOR THE OUTER PERIMETER AND THE INNER PERIMETER WILL GREATLY ENHANCE THE SUCCESS OF ANY OPERATION.

    1. Hand Signals
    2. Breaching

    a. Tools
    1.The Ram
    2. The Hooligan
    3. Master Keys & Picks
    4. Explosives
    5. Shotgun Breaching
    3. Doors
    a. 5 types of doors
    b. Left swing
    c. Right swing
    4. Body Bunkers
    5. Stairways
    6.Outer perimeter Movement
    7. Urban Areas
    8. Non Urban Areas
    9. Wedge Formation
    10. Scrolling
    11. Parallel Movement
    12. Lateral Movement
    13. Corner Crossing
    14. Slicing the Pie
    15. Perimeter Placement
    16. Avoid the Fatal Funnel (Hallways and Doorways)
    17. Room Entry

    a. Criss Cross
    b. Button Hook
    18. Room Clearing
    a. One Man
    b. Two Man
    c. Three Man
    19. Types Of Entry
    a. Covert
    b. Dynamic
    c. Crises
    20. Debrief

    Tom
    http://www.perronitactical.com

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweatnbullets View Post
    Gabe Suarez has a book and a DVD. They are both called "The Tactical Advantage" and can be found here.
    I've got this book and I'll join Roger in saying it's pretty good. It's also convinced me that I don't want to be doing any house clearing unless I've got absolutely no other choice. Lots of opportunities to get shot in the back, especially if you're clearing a room solo.

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    How about this...

    Basic room clearing
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by semperfi.45 View Post
    How about this...

    Basic room clearing
    I could not get the link above to work. But I think I fixed it here.

    http://www.pgpft.com/Entry-Clearing_COF.pdf

    Nice addition Semperfi.45!
    Last edited by Sweatnbullets; June 10th, 2007 at 10:44 AM.

  9. #8
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    Very good outline!

    However way too much info to give out to the General Public (IMO) Just my $0.02

    P.S. I know Pat Goodale and some folks who work for him. First Class School and First Class Instructor. www.pgpft.com

    Tom
    http://www.perronitactical.com
    Last edited by DCJS Instructor; June 10th, 2007 at 12:49 PM.

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Take what you can from it, but seek out professional instruction.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

  11. #10
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    Semperfi.45-

    Sir-

    You have a PM.

    Tom

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array A1C Lickey's Avatar
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    Thanks Sweatnbullets, I've got a copy of the book on order. Thanks semperfi .45.

    Actually RR I've kind of already done that. Like I said I hung out with Goodyear's SAU (Special Assignments Unit- or something like that) when they were training in base housing. But that is a great idea and I think I'll try it.
    TSgt. Lickey

    It takes a college degree to break'em;
    and a high school education to fix'em!

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A1C Lickey View Post
    Thanks Sweatnbullets, I've got a copy of the book on order. Thanks semperfi .45.

    Actually RR I've kind of already done that. Like I said I hung out with Goodyear's SAU (Special Assignments Unit- or something like that) when they were training in base housing. But that is a great idea and I think I'll try it.

    No problem man!

    Like I said the book is slightly dated. The biggest changes in Gabe's teachings has to do with point shooting and movement.

    Gabe advocates "see what you need to see" shooting concepts and the use of dynamic movement. You will see some dated material in these two arenas. If you have any questions on the changes in philosophy, contact me here and I will get you pointed in the right direction.

  14. #13
    Member Array Teak's Avatar
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    When I worked at the PD we were extremly short handed and I wound up working lots of midnight shifts by my self after about 2 am. I had lots of opportunity to practice clearing buildings alone and I will be the first to tell you that it is not a fun feeling, there are times even when you have another person it is not easy. You have already heard, and know, that doing this alone is bad juju but in a situation like you described with your wife being home nobody can fault you for going in. Most of my tips deal with night time situations since that is where most of my experience is and chances are when you have to go searching your house it is going to be when something goes bump IN THE NIGHT.
    Since you are talking about your own house there are several things that you can do to help give you the upper hand. The first thing to do is learn the lay out of your house down to the footsteps. You might already have a good handle on the layout but knowing things like how many foot steps it takes to get down the hall is a valuable thing to know in the middle of the night. Being able to navigate things like hallways without the tell tale glow from a flashlight helps disorient this BG as to your location and direction of travel.
    Another thing I have seen done, and I actually thought it was rather clever, was putting lights on remote control. There are units available from Radio Shack that allow you to turn on a lamp from a distance. This works two fold but it can also work like a double edged knife so be careful. The down side to this little trick is that it has the potential to back light you which is a big no no in working low light environments. The advantage is you have the ability, depending on how your house is set up, to get a heads up view on a without actually having to be in the room. For example in my house I can see the living room through the dining room from the kitchen. I have this remote system hooked up to a lamp in the living room. I can hide in the darkness of the kitchen and illuminate the living room without actually having to be in there and it is going to throw the BG's OODA loop way out of whack. Just remember in these types of settings split seconds make all the difference in the world.
    Another set up I have seen along the lines above involves motion sensors to be able to tell if someone has been in a room. I am not so fond of this option because it can tell the BG where you are just as easily as it can tell you where they are / have been. It just goes to show that although they might seem like good solutions in this situation things don't always work the way you want them to.
    The same guy that had the above to set ups also had the ability to turn on every light in his house from one switch panel. Like the above I have mixed feelings about this one.
    Another thing you can do is place mirrors in places that will help you see around corners. Along this same train of though you can also make it to where doors open all the way eliminating the possibility of someone hiding behind it.
    Above all the rest the biggest piece of advice that I can offer to you is practice, practice, practice! Know the lay out of your house, where the "dark spots are", how light reflects off of certain areas, where the blind blind spots are, and where people can hide will all come into play when it counts.
    When trying to move through a house alone I like to try and keep a wall to my back as much as possible and at all cost avoid having your back to things like unsecured doors or closets. Being able to lock a room after you have cleared it is a nice feature but it isn't fail safe remember that. Work the room using corners, when you come into a room hit your closest corner first then move down the wall going from one corner to another. When coming from one room back out into a main room or hall remember to clear that area again, you are moving so what says the BG isn't doing the same. Take your time and don't go blazing through rooms because that will drastically increase your chance of missing something or getting caught off guard. If you see something like a foot stick out from under the curtains or around the corner then you might want to revert to dynamic movement to gain the element of surprise.
    A small side note about equipment if I might. Having a good working flashlight is a vital part of all of this. If you keep a dedicated bedside light like I do but never check it chances are when you need it the batteries will be bead or the bulb will be blown. I give mine a little tap every night before I crash to make sure all systems are a go. Just like I check my pistol to make sure a round is chambered before I put it in its place at night. Another thing you should do is see how your light works in your house, it might sound odd but it is possible to actually have too bright of a light. Especially if you have white walls or tile floors the light can reflect and screw your night vision completely. Something like a surefire 6P puts out all the light you will need. If you have the available funding get yourself a dedicated weapons mounted light. This will give you the freedom of another hand to work doors and perform other task, like FIGHT, while still being able to have a functioning light. Another tip when dealing with lights is use the "halo" of the light to navigate and search as much as possible. This is the outer ring of light on the beam that is slightly less bright than the core. Also try strobing your light while moving through the room this will help disorient any possible intruders again giving you that split second advantage. I like to use a modified version of the FBI style by waving the light from side to side above my head while strobing for maximum effect.
    Hope this helps you in your quest for knowledge. Good luck and remember that simplicity is usually the answer! You can windup trying to do too many things at once and getting !
    Pierce

    "Fear is what keeps you alive but panic is what kills you" - Leo

    "At contact distances, if you can't shoot him, hit him...Nothing says 'TAP' can't be accomplished by smashing the magazine into his face." - Gomez

    TRAMPLE THE WEAK AND HURDLE THE DEAD

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    Semperfi.45-

    Sir-

    You have a PM.

    Tom
    You Sir have a reply!
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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