Close Quarters Battle for the Concealed Handgun Permit Holder

This is a discussion on Close Quarters Battle for the Concealed Handgun Permit Holder within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; (CQB) Close Quarters Battle for the Concealed Handgun Permit Holder By: Tom Perroni When you hear (CQB) Close Quarters Battle you think of SWAT doing ...

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    Close Quarters Battle for the Concealed Handgun Permit Holder

    (CQB)
    Close Quarters Battle for the Concealed Handgun Permit Holder

    By: Tom Perroni

    When you hear (CQB) Close Quarters Battle you think of SWAT doing a building or room entry; methodically searching a house or building room by room and floor by floor. You conjure up images of operators all clad in black carrying
    MP-5 sub machine guns.

    I teach a different type of (CQB) at Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy. First let’s take a look at some statistics.

    The FBI in the Uniform Crime Report (UCR) tells us that most shootings - about 80% - occur in low or reduced light. Most shooting involving police officers and civilian concealed carry permit holders happen at a distance of less than ten feet with average distance at three feet. In most police shooting the average number of rounds fired is ten. Keep in mind that most police agencies have a magazine capacity of 15 rounds. Of those ten rounds only two hit the subject that means an 80% miss rate. It is fair to say that most gun fights last about 10-15 seconds. And I would say as a general rule we know that action beats reaction.

    I am sure you have also heard about the “Anatomical Theory of Stopping Power” The theory that states there are only two places on the human body that you can shoot a subject and get immediate incapacitation:

    1. The cranio-ocular cavity (about the size of a business card). This is the area on the head between the eyebrow line and the mustache line (Right between the eyes).
    2. The Cervical Spine. From the base of the brain to the top of the collar bone (In the area of the Throat.)

    Both of the above mentioned areas, when hit with a bullet, will shut down the central nervous system, thus incapacitating your attacker. There are also schools that teach the Pelvic Gretel shot. I am not a big proponent of this. When teaching I often ask my students “How many of you have seen a chicken get its head cut off?” “What happens once this happens?” The answer I most often get is it runs around for several minutes. My response is if a 10lb chicken can run around for several minutes what do you think a 200lb man bent on bringing the fight to you will be able to do? (Adrenalin is a powerful drug) I often get asked, “Well, what if I shoot him directly in the heart?” The answer is: It will take about 15 seconds to bleed out. How much damage can the attacker inflict in that time?

    This may often happen because most police academies and shooting schools teach to shoot to center mass (It’s a larger target area to place shots). When the day comes and you are in a gunfight and place your shots center mass and the attacker does not go down then panic can set in and the good guy keeps shooting center mass. More hits mean more blood loss, but it’s still a time consuming process.

    Remember I also teach that the Handgun is a tool: a tool to fight your way back to the long gun or shotgun you should have had if you new you were going to be in a fight. But since we carry a concealed handgun permit and often times we only have access to a handgun lets discuss (QCB) with a handgun.

    The first thing I teach is the “Combat Mindset” this has been covered in a previous article. Then we move to Handgun handling skills this includes but is not limited to the 5 points to the draw. Let’s go over them. I am a firm believer that if you can not present the handgun properly then you can not fight with the handgun.

    1. Non shooting hand moves to abdomen, Shooting hand moves to handgun a good grip is acquired in the holster ( the web of the hand is high on the tang of the back strap.) And we have disengaged any retention device on the holster.
    2. We draw the handgun out of the holster by pulling up until we clear the top of the holster. Elbow pointing up and to the rear.
    3. The Elbow is rotated downward to the holster and the handgun rotates up and has a natural point of aim at the center mass of the target with a slight cant of the handgun to the right.
    This is what I consider CQB position #1 shots can be fired in this position and with a slight upward tilt a head shot can be taken. Please note this is not aimed fire but rather point shooting using your body to index the handgun towards the target.
    4. The handgun is pushed towards the attacker moving forward in a straight line. At this point in the middle of the chest the non shooting hand makes contact with the handgun, with fingers over fingers thumb over thumb giving 360 degrees of control on the handgun as we hold the handgun in this position.
    This is what I consider CQB position #2 close retention shots can be fired from this position. This also gives the shooter a great deal of control over the handgun when moving in any direction. This is also great for handgun retention. Please note this is not aimed fire but rather point shooting using your body to index the handgun towards the target.
    5.Then we press the handgun out until the arms are fully extended in a perfect Isosceles position to take distance shots at 7 yards or greater.

    I consider (CQB) or close quarters battle at a distance of 10 feet or less with the average distance being 3 feet. I teach my students to shoot and move from the threat. Remember when doing a draw if you go from #1 to # 5 you may give the attacker your gun or at the very least make it easy for the attacker to take your handgun from you. However in order to be proficient at this distance and with this method, practice is the key. There is no such thing as muscle memory. However perfect practice makes perfect patterns. When you’re in a gunfight it will normally be at close range. Are you prepared to fight? Will you rise to the occasion or default to the level of your training? I once had a student ask me after a Handgun courses for Concealed carry why we only trained a 3-7 yards My response was Do you really think you should be shooting at someone 25 yards away? My father always taught me when training for the fight make it as realistic as possible; paper targets don’t shoot back. Your attacker will not just stand their. The root word in Gunfight is “fight”. Remember to train at CQB distance and remember to move. My father taught me to remember 3 things in a gunfight… Shoot, Move, Communicate. Smooth is fast; speed is fine; accuracy is final. There are no second place winners in a gunfight.

    If I had to sum this all up for you it would be: train hard, train often and train for the fight. Remember that most gunfights happen at close distance. Are you prepared to prevail? Have you trained properly to shoot to stop the threat or have you just spent time at the range? Practice the 5 points to the draw and practice your close quarter’s battle shooting use your body to index the shots in the head and cervical spine.

    One this process is masterd we will start training on Movement!


    "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option".

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    Member Array Randy's Avatar
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    Very similar to our program.

    EU/ED is one of the techniques - we also work with the gun a little higher, indexing off of the pec. In that mode, you have an index and kinesthetic alignment with the threat. It is a form of "point shooting" but not "unaimed fire". You are aiming the pistol with your body index and kinesthesia. We describe it as "unsighted fire". After learning the position and 15 minutes of practice, one can draw and fire from this position and reliably hit a target several yards away - a distance farther than one would normally fire from a retention position.

    Movement comes in a lesson very soon after learning the draw and safety circle position, but it doesn't become clear just how important movement really is until we shoot the moving target. Once the students see how easy it is to miss a laterally moving target at a "walking" speed, they realize the importance of those few side-steps "off the line" when the attack starts and they are starting to draw.

    We also do a variant of the Tueller drill with a rubber knife and sims. It doesn't matter how fast the shooter is or whether or not he "beats" the person running at him with the knife. If the shooter doesn't move as soon as he realizes he is being attacked, he gets "cut". Every time.

    I like the recognition of the word "fight" in "gunfight" - it helps emphasize the totality of the situation and bolsters the mindset needed to win the encounter. Most people have been in a "fight" at some point in their life and can relate to what it means. Most people have never been in a gunfight and, without that previous reference or life experience, the term is kind of meaningless. In that light, we also teach techniques for using the handgun as a striking instrument. When the handgun fails to function or you run out of ammo, you are NOT out of options and most definitely, NOT out of the fight.

    Good stuff!

    Randy

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    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Nice explanation of retention and partial extension shooting, Tom. However, I think it's worth noting that at the sort of distances we're talking about here, going for your handgun isn't always the best option. This was really driven home to me in a course I took last month. During force on force training, going gun vs. gun at very close range (3 yards or less) often ended up with both students getting shot. However, if one student went for a disarm, or tried to trap their opponent's gun in the holster, the results they got were generally much better.

    There's an old saying, "If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem starts to look like a nail." When someone carries a firearm, I think there's a tendency to look at it as the solution to any violent situation. There are times, particularly at 'bad breath' distances when it may not be the best choice.
    Last edited by Blackeagle; June 7th, 2007 at 02:03 PM. Reason: Add missing word

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    Good post, but I personally refuse to train exclusively with the old "weak hand in front of the abdomen, waiting for the gun to be brought to it." Many close in scenarios would have me punching, blocking, grabbing, re-directing throwing my shopping bag, or playing the pold rope a dope while I draw with my strong hand. If I can buy myself .25 second thats a big advantage.
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    Member Array Randy's Avatar
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    If I can buy myself .25 second thats a big advantage.
    It certainly can be.

    There's also a good chance your support hand will be involved in some way with pulling a shirt or other cover garment out of the way so the handgun can be accessed. Make sure your training includes drawing from a concealment holster utilizing the various concealment garments you wear.

    The main reason for getting the support hand on your chest before the draw is to ensure that the support hand and arm are behind the muzzle when you draw. If you have to shoot quickly you want your arm out of the way before the gun clears the holster. Placement of the support hand on the chest or abdomen (depending on the draw used and your physical size) also puts it into a position where a transition from one handed shooting position to a two handed shooting position is easily achieved with minimal wasted movement.

    As with many things in life - one size does not fit all. The more ways your instructor can show you how to do something, the more likely there will be at least one way that works well for you.

    I think it's worth noting that at the sort of distances we're talking about here, going for your handgun isn't always the best option.
    You are exactly right. A concern here is that disarms tend to work well only within a very narrow set of circumstances. If your set of circumstances allows for such, it might be the better option. If you can push the gun away and safely escape, that would be a better option yet. Of course, that's what training is really all about - leaning some of the options you will have, how they work, and how to put them into action.

    Randy

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    Randy-

    Thanks for the term: "unsighted fire". I will use this from now on it makes more sense.

    I learned the safety circle position from the NRA and think it is good however I learned position sul from my friends at BW.

    I also agree with; "When the handgun fails to function or you run out of ammo, you are NOT out of options and most definitely, NOT out of the fight." This is from my article on the 5 rules for concealed carry:

    You must get Training. I can’t say this enough: take as much training as you can from as many different instructors that you can. Your tactical toolbox needs to be full, but not just with handgun training; also include training on other tools such as knife, empty handed, martial arts, and shotgun, AR-15 / M4. Learn as much as you can from everyone you can. However you need to progress in your training to get a solid foundation. At Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy we use the crawl, walk, run method of training.

    Tom
    http://www.perronitactical.com

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    LBrombach-

    If you can do all those things while shooting and moving....you are in good shape!

    My premis here is to teach people to be safe with a handgun first and formost. I never what to train them in a technique that will cause them to cover any part of the body with the muzzle of the handgun.

    However as I always say the root word of Gunfight is...FIGHT!

    Thanks for the valuable input!

    Tom

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    Blackeagle-

    I could not agree with you more!

    That is why I always say:...Make sure the "Tactical tool box" is full.
    with a knife, empty handed, martial arts, and shotgun, AR-15 / M4. Learn as much as you can from everyone you can. However you need to progress in your training to get a solid foundation. At Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy we use the crawl, walk, run method of training.

    Thanks for the valuable input!

    Tom
    http://www.perronitactical.com

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    I learned the safety circle position from the NRA and think it is good however I learned position sul from my friends at BW.
    When I posted the bit about "safety circle" it didn't dawn on me at the time that the NRA teaches two methods. Just wanted to be clear on which one we use.

    I don't care for the position (and I don't know the name of it or from where it comes) that has the arms extended away from the body and the gun pointed down.

    The second one they teach is sul and I use a variant of that. I don't care to have the muzzle pointed off to my side as found in sul. The angle (and problem) is exacerbated when the wrist becomes fatigued after holding the position for an extended period. It is way too easy to sweep someone else (your partner, for example) when turning. As a slight variant on sul, we keep the gun pointed straight down and slightly in front of your feet.

    Here's a picture of it.


    Here's a picture of "lazy" or fatigued sul.


    I also don't make a conscious effort to put the tips of my thumbs together as done by Joseph.

    Randy

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    DCJS and Randy:

    You guys are, of course, right about not wanting your hands in the line of fire, but you guys also know that if a gun is in your face, it is quite possible to re-direct that weapon before the trigger can be pulled. Not always the way to go, but I won't take any options off the table. For this reason, most of drawing from cover practice is done one handed (not all, but most). I don't want to take a weapon (my weak hand) out of the fight. Sometimes, the general has to sacrifice a few privates for the greater good.
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    Tom,
    I think you are off to a good start and CQB techniques are my favorite subject to talk about.

    I believe that with any good CQB class you have to first teach one-handed skills because the support hand is most likely going to keep your opponent off balance or off of you. Secondly most people have not developed this skill to its full potential. The one and two handed shooting platform must be able to integrate with h2h skills and flow from one to two handed drawstoke/shooting. The shooting platform and h2h techniques must also be compatible with movement. I teach the two handed drawstoke after the one handed drawstroke is mastered and it mirrors the one handed drawstroke. I use compress ready position and the height of the gun in the ready position is determined on the environment.

    Unsighted/point/threat focused shooting skills: One must build the proper eye/hand coordination to the point where the rounds hit were the eyes are focused on. This is the key to unlocking dynamic movement and the nose index is what make this happen.

    Things like economy of motion, action beats reaction, and taking the initiative should be discussed and its importance. This is the basis of my sight continuum. While I like EU/ED, I believe in teaching the student to shoot throughout their drawstoke and zipper up the body as fast as they can pull the trigger. The student starts shooting at EU/ED and stops at ¾ hip or point shoulder depending on distance. This inflicts the maximum amount of damage to the body and causes disruption/damage to multiple bodily system and organs. By shooting up the centerline of the body increases the chance of a round hitting the spine and the zipper ends at the head. Speaking of headshots…headshots are not as effect as most people believe them to be. I have responded to several shooting where handgun bullets did not penetrate the skull. Which goes back to continue to shoot to the attacker is no longer a threat which might take more then one round. I know of one shooting were a woman was shot in the head by her husband and the round went straight through and exited out the back. The husband thought she was dead and left for get a drink and she woke up and called the police and was talking to EMT’s in the ambulance when I got there.

    Distance determines the amount of extension used in CQB and movement is used to either close or create it. Movement is also use to get off the line of attack or get to a position of advantage.

    All of the above things do not do the shooter any good if they do not take the time to master the material. A shooter must build these skill sets to the point where they can do it without having to think about it. The sub-conscience mind is a powerful and underutilized tool we use every day. For example the conscience mind decides you want to walk down the hallway, once the action is initiated the sub-conscience mind takes over. The same thing should happen when you draw your weapon, reload your weapon, malfunction drills, and holstering your weapon. You should not have to look and think about any of these actions. This is what muscle memory really is.

    I do not like position SUL and I see little advantage to it over other positions. In the pictures posted, the person is chicken winged with his elbows sticking out. Those elbows sticking out makes it harder to move around in confined spaces and the bigger your chest is the more they tend to stick out. So, I position my gun lower with my thumb lower on the bottom of my sternum and my off hand is in a high guard position. The other position that is good for close quarters gunfights is to place the gun behind your leg. This keeps the out of sight to anyone in front of you and draws the least amount of attention to the gun. The gun can be drawn and placed behind the leg if the person has the suspicion that they maybe a potential target.

    Which bring us to the most important skill one can develop, threat identification, non-verbal indicators and command presence. Criminals are hunters and they look for other hunters while targeting sheeple. The two responses I got the most from victims was I never saw them or I knew they were up to something but I didn’t want to appear rude.

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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    I do not like positional Sul either

    Some people say it feels Natural to them but sure Don't to me and i don't like where the gun points

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    The one big advantage of position sul is that it safely allows a real 360 degree check on the range without sweeping everybody behind or to either side of you. Any unnaturalness or discomfort is more than made up for by actually encouraging people to thoroughly check behind them as part of their post fight drills.

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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    true but if i'm by myself with no one else but me and the bad guy .. or let me rephrase that no one but me and the bad guy and people i don't know ..no point if i was with a team fine but since 99% of the time its gonna be me myself and I ill skip it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackeagle View Post
    The one big advantage of position sul is that it safely allows a real 360 degree check on the range without sweeping everybody behind or to either side of you. Any unnaturalness or discomfort is more than made up for by actually encouraging people to thoroughly check behind them as part of their post fight drills.
    So are you saying that Sul is the solution to square range training so you don't sweep your shooting buddy just so some instructor can see you check your six?

    If I'm in a shootout, BTDT, I'm only concerned about not sweeping my team mates which I simply lower the gun however everyone else is a potential threat and gets the business end of my weapon.

    Call me what you want but when I have had to draw down on people in public places I was not concerned about who I offend by pointing my weapon at them because those that did not have to be there left in a hurry and those that approached me not in uniform where a potential threat.

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