A defensive draw stroke

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Thread: A defensive draw stroke

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    A defensive draw stroke

    Defensive Draw Stroke
    A defensive draw stroke is not only an efficient way to get a pistol out of a holster, but a way to ensure you keep your pistol and not just hand it to someone. You will not hear or see me write point shooting because of all the controversy and misunderstanding of the term. I will not advocate a certain stance, Weaver, Isosceles or whatever the latest stance is. We use a fighting posture, now if I had to pick one for full extension shooting it will be the Modern Isosceles. In force of force training and exercises we consistently see the same errors in fighting with a handgun:
    1. Timing, everyone wants to go for a gun. Know when it is time to get it and when it is time to leave it alone. Getting better position (distance) or some form of physical control of the persons limb closest to your gun is your friend.
    2. Everyone wants to project that gun as far toward the target as possible to soon. This will have your draw fouled by your opponent; you may even have the gun just taken away. You will probably be fighting over the gun, now your problem has grown dramatically.
    3. Blading the hips, we see cops blade the gun from people during an interview stance to protect the gun, this bears false witness for the following reason:
    a. Look at police videos, most cops that suffer a successful gun grab have been:
    1. Knocked out
    2. Knocked to the ground
    3. Or had the gun taken during the draw stroke
    4. Or multiple people have gotten involved
    b. When you blade the body you offer your gun to anyone that may be behind you. Lineman in foot ball stand square to the other line man and keep weight forward, to keep from being knocked on their ass. Get knocked on your butt and we move back to a.

    Count one
    In a fighting posture that offers you the opportunity to move and move fast, weight forward of the feet, nose over toes if you will. Keep the hips square to the target. The support hand comes high to the chest, this affords you the best opportunity to block, and fend off a strike to the head. The firing hand clears any cover garment, you drive the hand down onto the pistol, as high up the back strap as you can get it, the trigger finger is along side of the holster, the three remaining finger tips meet the front strap sliding into a full grip. The pressure is added like squeezing a pair of pliers, front to rear. The firing thumb is flagged high, (helps to remove more garment that you may have missed). This firing grip is obtained in the holster and it must remain consistent, changing the pressure or grip will cause inaccurate shot placements and or loss of control. Your grip is also part of weapons retention!


    Count two
    The gun is drawn straight up the vertical line of the body to itís highest point, the elbow and shoulder is high, (you will find a burning sensation in the shoulder if you hold it for a few seconds) the wrist is locked straight, keeping the elbow pulled in as tight to the body as we can, (no chicken wings) this will bring the gun to what we call the pectoral reference point (guys should be able to tickle their nipple with that flagged thumb, ladies depending on structure will have to pick a reference point, bra seem or something). The gun will be pointed slightly down, this will allow you to shoot and not hit yourself in the support hand if you are fending or fighting with it (0 to 5 feet retention shooting).


    Count 3
    The gun comes right across the chest to meet the support hand where it marries into a full two handed firing grip, this is where the side to side grip comes from, the support hand. The gun is kept horizontal to the ground. The pistol is projected only enough that you can visually reference some part of the pistol in your peripheral vision. Again the gun is higher than it was in 2. This is say maybe beyond 5 feet to 10 feet.




    Count 4
    This count is any where between 3 and full extension depending on the proximity of the target. When you leave 3 the gun comes up and into the line of sight, no since waiting until the gun is all the way out to see the gun or sights. As a matter of fact each count in the 4 count draw stroke brings the gun higher than it was previously. From the ending of 3 and all the way out to full extension, the gun is visually referenced in some form, gun silhouette, sights or what ever you may want to call it or just what you need to see. If sighted fire is possible it is always more accurate. For example at 10 feet I may only need to see the gun in peripheral to hit, at 70 feet I will need to see hard sights.

    Remember distance and time is going to be a consideration, if you start off at 2 shooting from retention, we do not remain there, if at all possible we shoot and move, as distance allows, we move the gun to 3 and out to 4 if possible.

    If you use the out of holster, rotate the gun to the target draw stroke you may very well shoot the support hand if fending, you may hand the gun to your opponent. It is a bad habit to drop the elbow, dropping the elbow raises the muzzle. This crap may work on paper it will not work reliably when we are fighting. The gun in close to the body as described in the 4 count draw stroke allows for greater retention and more control over the gun.

    Later when I have time I will post a photo tutorial with this.

    Written by Ken Forbus
    Ken currently trains civilians, law enforcement, military and government agencies. He is also the Owner of FIREARMZ- Professional Firearms and Defensive Training.
    For training biography you can check this link
    www.firearmz.net
    Ken Forbus Owner of FIREARMZ
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  3. #2
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    HMMMMMMMMMM.

    Very well thought out explanation Ken!

    However if someone wants to learn this from you or me or any other competent Instructor they MUST attend training.

    We can write out how to do it all day long. But I need to see the student and show them exactly what they need to do. Then give them a critique good or bad. I need to demonstrate what I want them to accomplish. I then need to verify that they are doing it correctly; we then need to practice several hundred times before we ever get to the range.

    Just my $0.02

    Tom

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    I agree whole heartedly. We have lots of videos with all of these in action, as well as demonstrate them in real to our students with out prior outline or rehearsal. This way they see the benefits and its performance as a multi-functional platform rather than just shooting.
    Ken Forbus Owner of FIREARMZ
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    Ok pictures
    This could be a fending position or halting a unknown contact. The hands could be a little bit higher in all actuality.


    This is position 1, note shirt is pulled all the way off the gun, and a firm grip is established.


    Here we are at Position 2, notice how high the elbow and shoulder is, the wrist is locked for stability and control.


    This is position 3, note the gun hand and support hand have married here at the centerline of the body, the gun is just in peripheral view.


    In the rest of the photos, notice how the gun comes up as it goes out, always getting higher into the line of sight. At any time due to target proximity I can stop and shoot or shoot as I go out.






    Note that all the way thru the drawing sequence my support hand is in a position to fend off a blow. The gun stays in close to my body for control until target proximity allows for me to extend it.
    Ken Forbus Owner of FIREARMZ
    FIREARMZ FORUM

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