IDPA Classifier questions

IDPA Classifier questions

This is a discussion on IDPA Classifier questions within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Shooting my qualifier this Sunday. What should I expect? Thankfully it'll be after the regular match , so I'll be a little easier on the ...

Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: IDPA Classifier questions

  1. #1
    New Member Array Ed Siquentes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    14

    IDPA Classifier questions

    Shooting my qualifier this Sunday.

    What should I expect?

    Thankfully it'll be after the regular match , so I'll be a little easier on the trigger by then

    Thanks Guys.


  2. #2
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258
    The Best advice I have seen comes from the folks at CCIDPA and I am taking the liberty of posting them here.

    Classifier Stage Tips
    The IDPA Classifier stage descriptions and procedures are available on the main IDPA Web site. Also, the IDPA Equipment and Competition Rules are posted there (PDF format). Study is well worthwhile. The following assumes that you have read the Classifier stage descriptions, and have them handy for reference.

    Classifier Stage 1
    In Stage 1 strings 1 through 4, do not miss the head shots, even if you have to slow down and shoot only 1 good shot every 2 seconds. Remember, a miss is 5 points down, which adds 2.5 seconds to your score. So even if you took 2 seconds for each shot and scored a hit instead of a miss, you'd still be way ahead!

    The head shots in the Classifier are all-or-nothing. A shot dropped into the body does not count at all. Take your time and get all the hits.

    In string 5, the targets are engaged one shot each weak-hand-only. Remember that when shooting one-handed, the gun will tend to recoil "in", that is, toward your other side. This means that it is slightly easier and faster when shooting left-handed to engage the left-most target in the array first, followed by the targets to the right of the first one. This is especially true if you cant the gun slightly inboard to reduce muscle tension in your forearm and improve accuracy.

    In string 6, you will start facing up-range, turn, draw, and engage the targets. For safety reasons, CCIDPA prefers that you turn to your gun side. This results in limiting the possibility of the gun being pointed up-range to a narrow 90-degree window, rather than a 270-degree window if you turn away from your gun side. You may also be disqualified if you point your gun up-range, but we are talking safety here. (Turning away from the gun side is taught by many respected firearms instructors, as it "hides" the draw, even if it is a bit slower.) While CCIDPA does not wish to make you do anything that goes against your training or preferences, we recommend and prefer that you turn to your gun side while shooting this string. Usually, the Safety Officer will ask which way you intend to turn and will arrange himself and any bystanders to minimize exposure to your pistol. If you are not asked, please state which way you intend to turn.

    In string 7, the targets are engaged two shots each strong-hand-only. In this case, the gun will tend to recoil toward the weak side, so a right-handed shooter is well advised to engage the right-most target first, followed by those to the left of it. For a left-handed shooter, the reverse is true.

    Classifier Stage 2
    Stage 2 strings 1 and 2 involve shooting on the move. Keep your knees flexed, walk heel-to-toe, and "glide along" -- the front sight will not bounce at all if you do this right. You can practice this at home, or even at the office -- using a full coffee cup instead of your gun. The "step and drag" method requires that you time your shots and although it is still taught to some military/LE groups, it is not very effective except in special situations like team-action riot control, or negotiating uneven or unknown terrain in the dark. For all other situations, use the glide -- it works.

    Also, remember to practice the glide forward and backward.

    In string 3, you will once again start facing up-range. The notes above concerning Stage 1 string 6 apply here as well.

    The last two strings (3 and 4) in Stage 2 are done while standing still, and resemble strings 6 and 7 in Stage 1. But remember that you are now at 10 yards instead of 7, and you will need to slow down a bit compared to 7 yards to get good hits.

    Classifier Stage 3
    Big Secret: For shooters at the Marksman level and below, this stage is actually a Bullseye Target Pistol Match disguised as an IDPA stage. There is even a barricade and a tactical reload thrown in to fool you into forgetting this! But there are 18 shots at 20 yards, and 12 more shots at 15 yards. Slow down! Way Down. Shoot this like you are shooting for a small group size at 25 yards! Many shooters rise from Marksman to Sharpshooter only by slowing down on Stage 3 and getting the hits. No kidding! - I did it myself, and I've seen many others do it as well.

    Just remember the IDPA scoring system:

    A miss is 5 points. That adds 2.5 seconds to your score. A worst-case hit in the -3 zone adds 1.5 seconds to your score. The difference is one second. Who can't at least hit the target if they slow down by one whole second per shot?
    A hit in the -3 zone adds 1.5 seconds to your time. If you are hitting in the -3 zone, this means you can take 1 second longer to aim, hit the center, and still come out 1/2 second ahead!
    A hit in the -1 zone adds 1/2 second to your score. Slow down just a little less than 1/2 second, hit the center, and you are ahead!

    Don't Crowd Cover!
    Stage 3, strings 1 and 2 involve the use of a Bianchi Barricade, a portable wall section 6 feet high and two feet wide. In string 1, six shots are taken from one side of the barricade, a reload with retention is performed, and six shots are taken from the opposite side of the barricade. Many shooters handicap themselves badly in this string (and in IDPA stages in general) by crowding up against the barricade.

    If you crowd the barricade, you have to perform 10 steps:

    Draw
    Lean out or move to clear the barricade
    Raise, lower, or extend the gun to firing position
    Engage the targets
    Raise or lower the gun to clear the barricade
    Lean or move back in behind the barricade
    Perform a tactical reload or a reload-with-retention
    Lean out on, or move to, the other side of the barricade
    Raise, lower, or extend the gun to firing position
    Engage the targets
    If you simply step back three feet from the barricade, you can eliminate three of these steps. The above list is reduced to:
    Draw
    Extend the gun to firing position while leaning out from the barricade
    Engage the targets
    Lean back in
    Perform a tactical reload or a reload-with-retention
    Extend the gun to firing position while leaning out the other side of the barricade
    Engage the targets
    It's easy to tell which way is faster, more "tactical," and safer in a real-world gunfight. (The possibility of getting shot between steps 2 and 3 or between steps 8 and 9 of the first-described method above should not be discounted. If you expose yourself from behind complete cover, you need to be ready to shoot immediately, without taking any additional time to raise or lower the gun and then aim!)

    Another problem with crowding the barricade is safety. If you are swinging your gun up and down to clear the barricade, you are possibly endangering your feet or your head, or low-flying aircraft(!). "Charlie's Angels" and "Hill Street Blues" aside, this "gun-swinging method" looks a lot better on TV than it works in the real world. Even if you don't "swing," but rather pull the gun back against your body to clear the barricade, you may still have difficulty performing the required reload in the small space you have left yourself to work in -- and all because you have crowded yourself up against the wall. Back off and give yourself some room!


    Another Stage 3 Tip
    If you do a true IDPA-approved tactical reload (drawing the spare magazine, swapping it with the depleted magazine at the gun, and then stowing the depleted magazine), you may gain a significant time advantage in Stage 3 string 2. According to IDPA rules, you may move out from cover after seating the fresh magazine and dropping the slide, and not before. But you may stow the depleted magazine while running forward to the barrel. You are OK rule-wise as long as the fresh magazine is seated and the slide is down before you leave cover, and as long as the used magazine is stowed before you fire another shot.

    In this kind of situation, the "tactical reload" is usually faster than the so-called "competition reload with retention" as discussed on our Safety and Tactics Tips page.

    The tactical reload is also superior from a real-world standpoint, in that it leaves the gun with only one round (in the chamber) for the shortest amount of time; Think about what happens if an unexpected bad guy comes around the corner in the middle of each of these two reloading techniques. In the case of the true tactical reload, you can reinsert the partially-depleted magazine if you haven't completely removed it and fire. Or you can finish inserting the fresh magazine and fire, dropping the depleted magazine. Using the "competition reload with retention," you have got only the one round in your chamber to solve the problem until such time as you retrieve the fresh magazine from your mag pouch. The "competition reload" can be slightly faster overall in some cases. But it is not faster when you have to move a good distance after the reload, like in Stage 3 String 2.

    Bullet drop at 20 yards
    A frequently-asked question is, "How high should I hold on the 20-yard targets in stage 3 to hit the center?" The answer is that you should not hold high at all, as the bullet drop at this range is negligible; Any drop greater than a fraction of an inch is due to the gun not being properly sighted-in, or to the shooter jerking the shot low because of poor trigger control. This can be confirmed by checking the ballistics data in just about any commonly-available reloading manual.

    Improving in IDPA
    If your results don't meet your expectations, seek out effective training in your area. Too many shooters doom themselves to a lifetime of frustration and under-performance by falling for the implicit message in the gun magazines: "Buy this new gun, it's better!" But years of buying every so-called "better gun" that comes along will improve your shooting performance only to a small degree, while a whole lot less money spent now on training will improve your shooting dramatically. Read more about training and the best equipment for IDPA.
    And from past experience: Don't keep an eye on your scores! The worst classifiers I ever had were the ones in I was more worried about making the time to go up in classification and paid less attention on being accurate & steady.

    Have fun!
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  3. #3
    Member Array TonyB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Schodack NY
    Posts
    284
    www.idpa.com
    has the cof for the classifier..but the above post is excellent.
    the last stage is always a killer for me....I was trying for expert in SSP last week,but didn't make it.
    "Just because I'm paranoid,doesn't mean they're NOT after me...."

  4. #4
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258
    Agree with Tony on that one. I crash and burn on Stage 3 because I either get cocky or I am tired. Pace yourself! Besides, the worst you can do is get classified as novice and then sandbag your fellow shooters at regular matches
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  5. #5
    New Member Array Ed Siquentes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    14
    Ok, yesterday was fun. We shot the local match first then only two of us were running the classifier, so they split us up in different bays so It could run quicker.

    Finished at SharpShooter level using a stock G19, and I was pleased with the days shooting.

    However during one of The El Presis' I should have slowed down on one of my targets..didn't miss any but should have been centered better...that string hurt and my RO told me to just slow down as my times were pretty good and concentrate.


    Thanks for that article Miggy, it helped a ton.

  6. #6
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258

    SSP Sharpshooter! All right! I am glad the article helped
    Four more divisions to go!

    next month I'll try for SSR and settle for Novice
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Enough of the Comp tac and Crossbreed questions? Same old questions
    By GlockLobster in forum Forum News, Feedback, Problems & Comments
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: August 5th, 2010, 08:18 AM
  2. Replies: 14
    Last Post: March 1st, 2009, 09:37 PM
  3. Setting a rig up for IDPA questions
    By Pete Zaria in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: February 17th, 2008, 07:24 PM
  4. IDPA questions
    By Hoss in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: July 19th, 2006, 02:56 PM
  5. IDPA Questions?
    By '75scout in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: March 7th, 2006, 11:44 PM

Search tags for this page

disqualified at an idpa qualifier
,
how to shot the idpa classifier
,
idpa classifier
,

idpa classifier pdf

,
idpa classifier reload
,

idpa classifier rules

,

idpa classifier tips

,
idpa marksman stage splits
,

idpa qualifier

,

idpa qualifier tips

,

idpa tips

,
running an idpa classifier
Click on a term to search for related topics.