(2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course for Va.

(2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course for Va.

This is a discussion on (2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course for Va. within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I need some feedback: Let me know if you would be interested or what you think about this course: Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy (2 Day) ...

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Thread: (2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course for Va.

  1. #1
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    (2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course for Va.

    I need some feedback:

    Let me know if you would be interested or what you think about this course:

    Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy

    (2 Day) Advanced Concealed Carry Course

    Prerequisite: PTTA or NRA Basic Pistol or DCJS (07E) (09E) or similar course.
    This is a course to teach you how to fight with a handgun. You MUST have a
    solid background in firearms safety & marksmanship before taking this course.

    Cost: $300.00

    This course goes far beyond the (4 hour) Safety Course. The purpose of this course is to teach advanced handgun manipulation skills and tactics that will enable the shooter to more effectively employ his/her handgun in an actual tactical environment. The focus of this course is the advanced development of general handgun shooting skills such as speed shooting, proper draw, reloads, shooting while moving. Course Syllabus:

    • Golden Rules of Deadly Force in Self Defense & “Just say Nothing”
    • Virginia concealed handgun & firearms law
    • Combat Mindset & Criminal Behavior
    • Color Code of Awareness (White, Yellow, Orange, Red, Black)
    • Combat Focus
    • Cover Vs. Concealment
    • OODA Loop / Fight or Flight
    • Weapons Retention
    • (5) Points to the Draw
    • Review of the Fundamentals of Marksmanship
    • Teaching the (3) types of reloads (Tactical, Emergency, Range)
    • Driving the gun (target to target)
    • Sight and recoil management in rapid fire shooting
    • Shooting on the Move
    • Engaging multiple threats (FAM Qualification course)
    • Anatomical theory of stopping power (FBI study)
    • Close Quarter Fighting
    • Equipment placement
    • Low light shooting
    • Malfunctions

    Equipment:

    Reliable handgun, hip holster, minimum of 3 magazines, 5 if not high capacity, magazine holder, shooting glasses, hearing protection, baseball type hat, flashlight with spare bulb and batteries and drinking water.

    Ammunition: 800 rounds of factory ammo.

    For more information contact: Tom Perroni (540) 786-3627 tomperroni@msn.com or www.perronitactical.com


  2. #2
    JD
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    Sounds good to me, question though, if not using high cap mags, the quantity is 5 mags, would you require the students using single stack mags to have a mag carrier that holds 4? That's kind of a rare item, my usual rig consists of a nice dual mag carrier, however using a nylon carrier I can fit 4 in there, but it's two mags in each slot where a double stack mag would normally fit, it works well for general range use, but for a course like what your describing, I think that type of a set up would be a recipe for disaster.

    Edited to add: Two dual mag carriers would solve that issue, and if that's the case, you may want to edit the required gear list to reflect such.

  3. #3
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    JD,

    a dual mag carrier will be fine. However the reason I suggest 5 mags if not high cap is that it makes the class flow more smoothly.

    You can put the extra mags in a pocket.

    Hope to see you in class!

    P.S. This is a new class offering so I wanted to see what kind of response I got before I put it on the course list.

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    Tom Perroni

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    Drop the just say nothing aspect and I'd just about promise to take it in the next year or so.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
    - Lt. Col. Oliver North

  5. #5
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    Tom,

    Your syllabus looks very similar to our 3 day intermediate level handgun class. Good stuff and a MUST for anyone carrying a handgun.

    Randy

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Tom,

    Your syllabus looks very similar to our 3 day intermediate level handgun class. Good stuff and a MUST for anyone carrying a handgun.

    Randy

    Randy,

    Great minds think alike! Great instructors teach alike!

    I am sure that which ever course someone took your 3 day or my 2 day they would get plenty of good training!

    Tom
    www.peronitactical.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Echo_Four View Post
    Drop the just say nothing aspect and I'd just about promise to take it in the next year or so.
    O.K. I'll bite why drop the 'Just say nothing" are you against the 5th amendment to the Constitution?

    I will be very interested to hear the answer. (as I am sure it is a good one)


    Tom Perroni
    www.perronitactical.com

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    I live in MD so your about as "Local" as I have found. I would be interested in something like that. Don't know that I would have any practical use though seing as MD is "May (yeah right!!) Issue"

    Thanks Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    O.K. I'll bite why drop the 'Just say nothing" are you against the 5th amendment to the Constitution?

    I will be very interested to hear the answer. (as I am sure it is a good one)


    Tom Perroni
    www.perronitactical.com
    I honestly don't know why you had to have an attitude in your response. You asked for an opinion, and I gave it to you. I'll try to refrain from matching your attitude in my response.

    I am not against the 5th Amendment. But, I do have enough common sense to know that people that decide to use it look as if they have something to hide. While it may not be able to be presented in court that you chose not use your right to remain silent it will alter the way you are looked at by LEO.

    In addition, self defense is an affirmative defense. The sooner that you have made the claim that you acted in defense the better off you will be. If you insist on saying nothing you are making that defense more difficult.

    Don't mistake my thinking that you should cooperate with LEO to mean you should get diarrhea of the mouth. But, making it clear that you were attacked by the person that you shot, pointing out witnesses and evidence, and then making it clear that you want to help as soon as you've spoken with counsel is, in my opinion, a much better option that lawyering up and shutting up.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
    - Lt. Col. Oliver North

  10. #10
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    IMHO, Tom's quoted comment "Just Say Nothing" was likely intended to mean simply:

    "Zealously guard your 5th Amendment rights. While you should remain courteous with law enforcement, realize that their number one priority is not to keep you from saying something that could potentially wind up being used against you by an attorney representing something or someone counter to your interests or the truth. A segment of this class will help you do just that."

    I suspect that instead of writing all of that, he shortened it to what he did to better fit into a course description. Just a thought.

    Edited to add: A refresher on the five points that Ayoob made to everyone involved in a self-defense shooting (referenced by Echo Four) would probably be a huge help to folks who don't know it backwards and forwards (like myself).

    cw
    Last edited by Plan B; September 4th, 2007 at 02:23 PM. Reason: Ayoob stuff

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    He could have well have had the thoughts you have. If so, then I apologize. But, there are many people out there (including many lawyers) that insist you should say nothing to LEO without an attorney present. I don't think that's the best of ideas.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
    - Lt. Col. Oliver North

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Echo_Four View Post
    I honestly don't know why you had to have an attitude in your response. You asked for an opinion, and I gave it to you. I'll try to refrain from matching your attitude in my response.

    I am not against the 5th Amendment. But, I do have enough common sense to know that people that decide to use it look as if they have something to hide. While it may not be able to be presented in court that you chose not use your right to remain silent it will alter the way you are looked at by LEO.

    In addition, self defense is an affirmative defense. The sooner that you have made the claim that you acted in defense the better off you will be. If you insist on saying nothing you are making that defense more difficult.

    Don't mistake my thinking that you should cooperate with LEO to mean you should get diarrhea of the mouth. But, making it clear that you were attacked by the person that you shot, pointing out witnesses and evidence, and then making it clear that you want to help as soon as you've spoken with counsel is, in my opinion, a much better option that lawyering up and shutting up.
    Echo_Four,

    Let me apologize for the way that sounded. I did not mean to sound like I had an attitude. I do want your opinion. While I do not agree with you 100%. Having been a police officer I have seen first hand what can happen when you talk when you should not have. I am also aware that sometimes you are in position where if you do not say something you are looked at in a bad light. I would like to PM you an article by a man named Dave Kopel the article is called "Just Say Nothing" and after reading it if you do not agree with it then we can agree to disagree.

    I always tell my students that what I teach them is one way to do something not the only way!

    Thanks for the input!

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    Tom Perroni

  13. #13
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    I'll be looking forward to the PM. I keep an open mind as much as possible- but I admit to being pretty set in my ways about making the claim of self defense as early as possible and pointing out any evidence that could disappear. Other than that, I figure everything else is up for debate to some degree.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
    - Lt. Col. Oliver North

  14. #14
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    Just Say Nothing

    This was to large to send as a PM!

    Just Say Nothing

    by Dave Kopel

    What if you've just been arrested for something which shouldn't be a crime? For instance, if a burglar breaks into your home, attacks your children and you shoot him. Should you talk to the police in detail about what happened? In a word, "No." Shut up, call the best lawyer you can find, and then continue to shut up. If you talk to the police, you will only make things worse for yourself.

    Sociologist Richard Leo has written several articles which detail the deliberately deceptive techniques which police use to extract a confession.

    First of all, since 1986 the Unites States Supreme Court has required that all persons under arrest be given the Miranda warnings, so that they will know that they have a right to remain silent, and the right to a lawyer. So how do police convince a suspect to talk, even after the Miranda warning?

    Professor Leo explains that "police routinely deliver Miranda warnings in a perfunctory tone of voice and ritualistic behavioral manner, effectively conveying that these warnings are little more than a bureaucratic triviality." Of course, the Miranda warnings are not trivial; your liberty may hinge on heeding those warnings.

    No matter how strong the other evidence against you, a confession will make things much worse. A confession often makes the major difference in the district attorney's willingness to prosecute the case, and his willingness to accept a plea bargain. If your confession gets before a jury, your prospects of acquittal are virtually nil.

    If you are foolish enough to reject the Miranda warnings, simply put, the police interrogators will attempt to deceive you into confessing. As a result of increased judicial supervision of the police, deception, rather than coercion ("the third degree") has become the norm for interrogation.

    First of all, you will be kept in a physical environment designed to make you want to waive your rights and talk. You will most likely be kept in isolation, in a small, soundproof area. By isolating you, the interrogator attempts to instill feelings of anxiety, restlessness and self-doubt on your part. Left alone for long periods, you may think you are being ignored, and will therefore be happy to see the interrogator return.

    Ideally, from the interrogator's viewpoint, you will begin to develop the "Stockholm syndrome," in which persons held captive under total control begin to identify and empathize with their captors. This can occur after as few as ten minutes of isolation in captivity.

    While increasing your dependence, the interrogator works to build your trust by pretending that he cares about you, that he wants to hear your story, and that he understands how difficult it may be for you to talk. The interrogator works to become your only source of social reinforcement.

    There is no law against outright lies or other deceptions on the part of police during an interrogation. Almost certainly, you will be told that the prosecutor and the judge will be more lenient if you confess. This is a complete lie. The district attorney will be more lenient if you don't confess and he can't make a strong case against you, and therefore has to settle for a plea bargain. Nothing the police promise in the interrogation room is binding on the police, much less on the district attorney.

    There are five "techniques of neutralization" which the interrogator may use in order to make you feel that the crime really wasn't so bad, and that it is therefore all right for you to confess. Of course the interrogator's pretense that he doesn't think the crime was serious will last only as long as necessary to obtain the confession.

    The first technique is called "denial of responsibility," allowing the subject to blame someone else for the offense. For example, "it was really the burglar's fault for breaking in; he's the one to blame for getting shot." (That's true, but it's you, after all, that the police are interrogating.)

    Another technique is "denial of injury." For example, "The burglar wasn't really hurt; he walked out of the hospital two hours ago." Maybe true, maybe not. In truth, the burglar could be in intensive care and the interrogator could be laying the groundwork for a murder case against you.

    In the "denial of the victim" technique, the interrogator will suggest that the victim deserved what he got.

    "Condemnation of the condemners" is always popular. For instance, "the real problem is all those anti-gun nuts who let criminals run loose, but don't want guys like you to defend themselves." True enough, but when the policeman saying this is holding you prisoner, take his sincere expression with a large grain of salt.

    Finally, there's the "appeal to higher loyalties" such as "What you did is a common sense thing. Regardless of some legal technicality, the most important thing is for you to protect your family. Your family comes first, right?" True again, but the man saying this wants you to confess to violating the legal technicality, so you can be prosecuted for it.

    A close cousin to the denial strategies are the "normalizing" techniques, in which the interrogator claims to understand that the crime was not typical behavior for the subject; "I can see that you're not a violent person. You're not a criminal. You're a tax-paying, home-owning, regular kind of guy. What happened tonight was really unusual for you, wasn't it?"

    You have nothing to gain, and everything to lose by talking. You are not going to outsmart the interrogator. Even if you don't end up producing a full confession, you may reveal details which will help build a case against you.

    Most violent criminals are too stupid to read, and too lazy to pursue a time-consuming, high-precision hobby like handloading. So I'm not worried that a violent criminal will read this column, and avoid confessing to a serious crime. Anyone who does commit a violent crime should confess, since they've done something that is wrong. Too often in America, good citizens are arrested for victimless "crimes," including unjustifiable (and unconstitutional) gun regulations. The routine use of deception in order to trick good citizens into confessions is something that deserves more scrutiny than it has thus far received.

    In the long run, routine deception by the police tears at our social fabric, and undermines the law enforcement system. The more police lie, the more skeptical juries are going to be, even when police are telling the truth.

    Moreover, there are about 6,000 false confessions for felonies every year in the United States. (Huff et al., "Guilty Until Proven Innocent," Crime & Delinquency, vol. 32, pages 518-44, 1986). False confessions are one of the major reasons for the conviction of innocent persons.

    Sources: Richard Leo, "Police Interrogation and Social Control," Social and Legal Studies, vol. 3, pages 93-120 (1994); "From Coercion to Deception: The Changing Nature of Police Interrogation in America," Law and Social Change, vol. 18, pages 35-39 (1992); Jerome Skolnick and Richard Leo, "The Ethics of Deceptive Interrogation," Criminal Justice Ethics, vol. 11, pages 3-12 (1992).

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array Scot Van's Avatar
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    YES

    TP,

    Recently able to travel for classes like this! Curriculum looks GREAT! Thanks for the update!

    S
    A man in the hands of his enemies is flesh, and shudderingly vulnerable. - author unknown

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