What Comes First?

What Comes First?

This is a discussion on What Comes First? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; OK, I own a standard size Springfield Armory XD40. I have shot about 100+ rounds through it. I believe in being armed for self-defense & ...

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Thread: What Comes First?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    What Comes First?

    OK, I own a standard size Springfield Armory XD40. I have shot about 100+ rounds through it. I believe in being armed for self-defense & that's why I got my CHL here in Texas.

    Now I have a question- what order should I do these items in?

    a) choosing a CHL gun (I prefer one gun that I can carry anywhere so that I am ultracomfortable with it- even in shorts & a t-shirt- I am leaning toward a subcompact XD40 or maybe a revolver with a bobbed hammer)

    b) take a training class (so I am not unprepared for using my weapon) beyond what the state teaches you

    And I have another question- how comfortable does a person need to be to carry a weapon? Should you just start when you believe in your heart that you are prepared to pull the trigger if someone was to threaten your life or an innocent person's life? Or should you have some deeper understanding of tactical strategies?


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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Tough question to answer. A hundred round through a pistol isn't really checking it out to me. With every gun I've carried, I've run 200 to 300 rounds of the round that I'll carry plus at least a thousand of practice rounds to become familar with it. Thinking about it, I'd take the training unless your experienced with a handgun beyond several years and thousands of rounds.
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  3. #3
    Member Array Arkhangel's Avatar
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    I would say since you already have a gun, go take a class and after decide what you might want. Every training class I have gone to, I always came away with information that I could use everyday. If it is a good school, they will explain the options that you have and how to utilize them. I wish I had taken the training sooner.

    I also would put more rounds through your XD if only to more properly break it in. Just my 2c....

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    I'd take a basic training class with the XD your already have, then choose your new gun based on what you learn there. Then take a class or two with your new gun. (the states course dont teach you crap, except how to pass the course)
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    Take those training classes! You will meet all kinds of new people and have a good time as well!

  6. #6
    Member Array absit's Avatar
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    Take a class, borrow people's guns, see what/how they carry.

    100 rounds isn't even enough to justify cleaning my carry piece, shoot a LOT more after you take your class(es). The class comes first so you can learn how to do it the right way first. Just know how your gun works.

    Remember whatever you go with you need to be able to shoot, so don't pick a gun so small you can't handle it under stress, I'm a big fan of the Glock 19, and I'd NEVER carry anything smaller because I'd be sacrificing grip and control. You can hide a Glock 19 in any wardrobe, any location, any time of year.
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  7. #7
    Member Array Manan's Avatar
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    Conceal carry is so personal. Everybody has different jobs, environments, body types, etc.

    Enjoy the pistol you own. Take classes. Observe and be aware.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    What would you guys suggest for a good novice class in North Texas?

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    100 rounds and a license doesn't make one safe, as you can understand.

    Can't say what you should do. Depends on your level of understanding about the responsibility, your level of mental awareness of the challenges and defensive mindset, your degree of preparation, your skill with a firearm, your defensive skills, your level of fitness, your appreciation for the various scenarios and the myriad ways an attack can compromise you and your family.

    What comes first? For me, it's chicken-and-egg. Competency and understanding prior to use.

    What I did, basically, was: 10K rounds per year on a range for a bit more than two years, while I gained physical competency with my specific firearm, general knowledge of various firearms, and ran through all of the questions of responsibility and risks (ie, could I shoot to defend, if need be). Only after that did I pursue a CHL. Only when I believed I could handle the situations that would arise.

    At that time, I purchased a 5 round S&W 442 Airweight revolver and a good pocket holster. Carried it everywhere, always. Was small and comfortable enough to be unnoticed after a couple of weeks. I have since moved to a CZ P01 9mm compact (well, "compact" is subjective, but it's small enough for my uses) and a KelTec P3AT 380ACP backup.

    And I have another question- how comfortable does a person need to be to carry a weapon? Should you just start when you believe in your heart that you are prepared to pull the trigger if someone was to threaten your life or an innocent person's life? Or should you have some deeper understanding of tactical strategies?
    I strived to become comfortable with both. But, that's just me. Lots of folks come from a background of shooting or hunting, have lots of older brothers to learn from, have been in the military or law enforcement, etc. I rolled my own, with various classes from numerous trainers, and a lot of consideration about the requirements. My requirements included, specifically, the ability to not strike the proverbial 3yr old across the street with a miss, the solid acknowledgement I could (and would) defend myself and family no matter what was required, and a reasonable defensive mindset and training regimen to explore and work on the skills required.

    Ditto on the training. There are a number of top-notch facilities around the country that are hard to beat. Plus, "saddle" time always helps. The more training from various instructors you can go through, the greater will be your appreciation for the challenges and skills required to be somewhat competent. Consider weaponless training, as well, or force-on-force style courses. Check with your sheriff or police department, as there may be instructors who are open to civilian training. Not living in Texas, I'm uncertain what you've got in the area, though just west of you (Arizona) is Gunsite, a very good group that covers most any training you can imagine.
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  10. #10
    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
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    there are pro and cons to both. during the class you may have a better understanding of what kind of gun you want.
    but also if it is a class where you can use your own gun, i think this will very VERY helpful. and i would personally do that.
    as far as how comfortable you must be with your gun before you carry it. i would say that 100% safety knowledge is a must., as well as an ability to hit the target. you dont have to be shooting holes within holes, but you certainly cant be missing the paper. and finally, in order to carry, you must have a personal understanding of yourself, and when you will and will not decide to use your firearm for defense.

    so i would say, do plenty of research, decide on a gun, shoot it enough that you know it well enough that you are comfortable with how it works and how well you can shoot it, take the class, and carry away!
    also, if you have an XD and already know it well, then i would say the XD40sc would be a good choice.

  11. #11
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    Take a class, shoot more, get the proper mindset before carrying.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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  12. #12
    Member Array 1911NM's Avatar
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    Since I more or less "grew up" with guns, I did have that working familiarity. However, I never really became "close, real close" to my carry gun until I attended training courses, one of which was mentioned by a previous poster, and shooting competition. I know a game is not the same as real life, but shooting IDPA or IPSC/USPSA gives you a feel of movement with a gun, indexing targets, clearing stoppages against time, and high round counts which I feel increase comfort levels with the gun in high stress situations.
    NRA, USPSA SS & Lim-10
    Blessed are they who, faced with danger, think only of the front sight. J. Cooper

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