60% gunfights happen at night/dark and another reason to train with beamhit

60% gunfights happen at night/dark and another reason to train with beamhit

This is a discussion on 60% gunfights happen at night/dark and another reason to train with beamhit within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; We've heard that 60% of confrontations happen at night or and low/no light situations. I've heard this reasoning used to justify having tritium night sights ...

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  1. #1
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    60% gunfights happen at night/dark and another reason to train with beamhit

    We've heard that 60% of confrontations happen at night or and low/no light situations. I've heard this reasoning used to justify having tritium night sights and/or rail mounted lights. I have never heard of this reasoning to justify low/no light training.

    Last month, the defensive accuracy group I belong to had courses of fire where we draw firearm and flashlight, light up the target and send one round on the target. It was done with complete light. The next evolution is planned to be done in low light. I was suprised at how long it took me to get my edc light into action. My light was in left front pocket of cargo type pants.

    With that, I am now carrying my light (surefire G2 or surefire E2D) on my belt horizontal at my 11O'clock. I have practiced a little with drawing and shooting one handed with getting my light into play.

    Tonight I decided to mix up my beamhit training a little. I trained in almost complete darkness in my garage, covered up the LED display on the beamhit target and had at it. I did about 60 draw/fire/move exercises in the darkness. Draw and shoot while simultaneously drawing my flashlight and shining it onto the target. After hit, flashlight off and movement from my original position in darkness.

    It definitely was an eye opener for me. It took some repetitions before I become OK with doing the combined actions. It is definitely practice that I will be including on a regular basis in my individual training.

    So, what have you done lately to train for low/no light confrontations?


  2. #2
    Member Array Larryes's Avatar
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    Learn point shooting. A light on a BG also makes you a good target.

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    Distinguished Member Array SixBravo's Avatar
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    Larryes beat me to it.

    I won't say I'm a pro by any stretch, but it would seem that muscle reflexes are still intact whether the lights are on or not.

    Myself? My buddies and I will do night shoots every few months when its not five below zero outside. Theyre a heck of a lot of fun. Bonfire afterwards with Dutch oven cooking and hot dogs.
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    Senior Member Array Pete Zaria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sojourner View Post
    I trained in almost complete darkness in my garage, covered up the LED display on the beamhit target and had at it. I did about 60 draw/fire/move exercises in the darkness. Draw and shoot while simultaneously drawing my flashlight and shining it onto the target. After hit, flashlight off and movement from my original position in darkness. It definitely was an eye opener for me.
    I don't have one of these "beamhit" target devices, but I'll try this doing some dry-fire drills (of course, always triple-check the gun first). It sounds like a good idea, and I haven't drilled that much before. Seems obvious, but I bet a lot of us overlook things like this.

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  5. #5
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    IMO, when there is enough light to see the target, point shooting without illuminating the target is preferred. But, when it is that dark to not be able to see/identify the target, some form of light needs to illuminate the target.

    Regarding muscle reflexes, I have no problem drawing and shooting one handed (point or aimed). What I had not practiced before was simultaneous drawing the flashlight and pointing it to the target while drawing the firearm and pointing it generally towards the target. Then at that time, lights on, fire, lights off, move. I hope that clarifies what I am doing.

    To me, taken individually, the moves are automatic. But combining the moves need to be rehearsed/practiced/trained to be automatic.

    Good point about not using the light. It gives me another idea. I should set up the environment with different levels of light so I can train when and when not to deploy the flashlight.

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    here is a Link to the different techniques. Personally, I like the neck-index method when I will be using the light in short bursts while firing and moving. If the light is to be on for any sustained amount of time, I will do something like the FBI.

    It is too hard for me to coordinate both hands shooting the weapon and the flashlight and being together. It is way easier to do one handed shooting.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array glock21guy's Avatar
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    I have done some night outdoor, and indoor simulators. I have found the Surefire G2Z, and the Surefire technique work best for me. My flash light is just behind my mag on my weak side in an open top sholster.
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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    I keep my light in my left hand in my coat pocket if I'm anyplace off the main drag with people all around in the winter. Summer is a little harder, but a light in the hand is legal in every place I know, and a 6P or M2 isn't very large.
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  9. #9
    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
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    A good deal of my training takes place at night/under low-light conditions.

    I consider being able to employ a handgun in conjuction with a handheld light an important skill, but I do not see the need to be able "speed draw" my flashlight in conjuction with my pistol.

    As for point-shooting. It may work when engaging a threat but does very little to resolve the threat identification issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawk6 View Post
    ... I consider being able to employ a handgun in conjuction with a handheld light an important skill, but I do not see the need to be able "speed draw" my flashlight in conjuction with my pistol. ...
    It sounds like you are content with not being able to deploy your weapon and light in a quick manner or that you think the probability of needing to do this is practically nil. Is it the former, the latter or something else. I am interested in your reasoning.

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    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sojourner View Post
    It sounds like you are content with not being able to deploy your weapon and light in a quick manner or that you think the probability of needing to do this is practically nil. Is it the former, the latter or something else. I am interested in your reasoning.

    It is the latter. The primary function of the light is to locate and/or identify a threat. If I am able to determine I need to access my handgun, then I have already located and identified a threat. I can not forsee a circumstance where I have sufficient light to react (i.e. draw my handgun) but lack sufficient light to act, requiring me to produce my light.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawk6 View Post
    It is the latter. The primary function of the light is to locate and/or identify a threat. If I am able to determine I need to access my handgun, then I have already located and identified a threat. I can not forsee a circumstance where I have sufficient light to react (i.e. draw my handgun) but lack sufficient light to act, requiring me to produce my light.
    Thanks for your response.

  13. #13
    Member Array Hoot's Avatar
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    As a long time SWAT instructor, retired, it is my opinion that there is no such thing as a "good" flashlight technique. But it is a good idea to learn and practice the neck index, the FBI, and at least one of the two hands methods. None is good, but they are all we have.

    Three things should be clear to any handgunner. It is necessary to gain a high degree of proficiency shooting with one hand and with either hand. Second, your flashlight should be a flood type light rather than a tight beam light. And, third, learn to point shoot with either hand.

    Many years ago I decided to learn to shoot proficiently with my left hand. For a year I restricted all of my handgun shooting to the left hand only, including agency qualifications. All my dry firing was left handed too. After the year was up, I could shoot as accurately as as quickly with my left hand as I could with my right. You need not go to this extreme, but a portion of each of your dry fire and live fire practice should go to the "off" hand.

    Regarding low light practice, the easy way to do it is to purchase a pair of welder's goggles. They are so dark that wearing them will simulate night or very low light conditions. This way you are able to shoot at any range during the day and practice low light shooting. But with the goggles your flashlight will be useless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoot View Post
    As a long time SWAT instructor, retired, it is my opinion that there is no such thing as a "good" flashlight technique. But it is a good idea to learn and practice the neck index, the FBI, and at least one of the two hands methods. None is good, but they are all we have.

    Three things should be clear to any handgunner. It is necessary to gain a high degree of proficiency shooting with one hand and with either hand. Second, your flashlight should be a flood type light rather than a tight beam light. And, third, learn to point shoot with either hand.

    Many years ago I decided to learn to shoot proficiently with my left hand. For a year I restricted all of my handgun shooting to the left hand only, including agency qualifications. All my dry firing was left handed too. After the year was up, I could shoot as accurately as as quickly with my left hand as I could with my right. You need not go to this extreme, but a portion of each of your dry fire and live fire practice should go to the "off" hand.

    Regarding low light practice, the easy way to do it is to purchase a pair of welder's goggles. They are so dark that wearing them will simulate night or very low light conditions. This way you are able to shoot at any range during the day and practice low light shooting. But with the goggles your flashlight will be useless.
    Thanks for the input.

    For the year left-handed year, did you also practice drawing from a left-handed holster?

    Where / how do you carry your flashlight?

    I integrate shooting one handed and left handed (one handed) into every dry-firing session w/ the beamhit. It may not be much, but 20 - 30 one-handed and one-handed left (3x/week) adds up over time.

    Thanks.

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array tns0038's Avatar
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    95 percent of a CCL holders need for self defense is going to take place where the BG is within 10 feet. Further the BG must have enough light for the assault, mugging etc. So you should be able to see the threat. And at 10 feet you should be able to draw and fire form the hip and hit the chest area.

    That being said, having to speed draw your flashlight is unnecessary, and may be confusing under a terrifying situation.

    Sure a flashlight is very handy for securing your property, and learning how to use one with your handgun is very important. But Iíll have to agree with Blackhawk regarding its uses otherwise.

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