Weapon Mounted Light Techniques

Weapon Mounted Light Techniques

This is a discussion on Weapon Mounted Light Techniques within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm interested in getting feedback on how to effectively and safely use a weapon mounted light. I'm getting a TLR2 soon for my XD45 tactical ...

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member Array mojust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Willimantic Connecticut
    Posts
    624

    Weapon Mounted Light Techniques

    I'm interested in getting feedback on how to effectively and safely use a weapon mounted light. I'm getting a TLR2 soon for my XD45 tactical and would appreciate some tips. I'm not a LEO, have no training in clearing a dark house, and merely want to know the best moves for a typical 65 year old home owner. I shoot pretty well and am in good health.

    I know enough not to leave the bedroom and go after the intruder. My concern is how to cover my bedroom. At present, I'd get my wife to call 911 from the protected corner of the room while I sight in on the door with a weapon mounted light laser. I know that with the XD 45 I have fourteen rounds, which should be more than enough.

    I'm also concerned with things like using a light to blind and disorient an intruder.

    Thanks in advance.


  2. #2
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    16,025
    Saving the light in the off mode till you need it is good. It doesn't give away your position. You can use the side spill of the light to light up an area without covering a unknown with the muzzle.
    Strobing can help to disorient, but once someone is entering the room I would just flip it on , identify the threat and concentrate on stopping the threat.
    Using any cover you can find is a good idea. Maybe try it out with the light to be sure on any obstructions / reflections you might get off mirror, ect.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array Knuckledrager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    693
    I think that Surefire publishes some basic low light techniques every so often. Check the magazine racks and look for the "combat tactics" magazine. Be prepared to bring the salt and don't be afraid to take a grain or two but there are some very useful thing to be had there.

    The basics are the same for a weapon mounted light as well as a hand held. Learn them and then integrate them both in to your defensive plan.

    Jeff Gonzales covers this information in a nicely condensed format in his book "Combative Fundamentals." Here is the link:

    Trident Concepts, LLC.; Concepts that meet reality, it is worth the effort
    "The liberty of the individual is no gift of civilization. It was greatest before there was any civilization." Sigmund Freud

  4. #4
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,428
    You need to always exercise caution mounting and removing your weapon mounted light.

    Your weapon mounted light is not a flashlight substitute.
    It should not be used as a general flashlight.
    It should be considered part of your firearm sighting system.

    Personally I'm luke warm on weapon mounted lights for civilians but I'm just an almost extinct dinosaur I guess.

    I'll stick with what I've already learned regarding off weapon low light combatives.
    Works for me and I see no pressing reason for me to move to a firearm mounted light.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  5. #5
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    CONUS
    Posts
    431

    Low & Reduced Light Training with Tom Perroni

    Low & Reduced Light Training

    by Tom Perroni

    When people hear the term "Low Light shooting", what they most often think of is shooting in the dark, while this is a bit misleading. At Perroni's Tactical Training Academy "Low Light shooting" is using a flashlight in conjunction with a handgun to fight when the area you are in while in the fight the light is low or reduced or non existent.

    In the FBI's (UCR) Uniform Crime Report it tells us that 80% of all Law Enforcement shooting happen in low or reduced light. So as a Concealed Carry permit holder, do you carry a flashlight? Even if it is not dark outside could you be in an area of low or reduced light? EXAMPLES: Parking Garage, Stairwell, Hallway, Alleyway, closets, tunnels, etc. This report transfers to "citizen" CHP shootings as well. Perpetrators of street crimes are more active after sundown. So if you do carry a flashlight, do you know how to use it?

    "The fear of the dark works both ways; you will be better prepared if you train in low and reduced light."

    The first step is having the tools. You need a flashlight, but which one? Surefire, Mag Light, Min Mag, Asp Tactical LED, etc. Before you decide, you need to know this:

    What is the purpose of the Tactical Flashlight?

    1) As an aid in low light navigation and movement.
    2) Locate and identify and assess threats and innocents.
    3) As a non lethal tool for controlling suspects and subjects.


    The biggest question I get asked about flashlights is:

    What is the difference between candlepower and lumens?

    Lumens is what is used to specify the total amount of light coming from any light producing device, and candlepower refers to the highest value of the light intensity to be found anywhere in the lights "beam".

    Lumens tell you how "powerful" the light-producing device is, be it a light bulb of any type, a flashlight, or a car headlight. Candlepower tells you how tightly focused the beam is, assuming the light source has a lens or reflector to focus the light into a beam.

    Lumens can be measured quite accurately, using an instrument called an integrating sphere, and identical lights would all have similar lumen values. It is an important quantity to know when comparing different lighting products, as it tells you how much light each one produces.

    Candlepower can also be measured accurately, using a light intensity meter to measure luminous intensity, and then by applying the appropriate formula, which takes into account how far the meter is from the light source. The problem is that the value measured depends on where in the beam you take the measurement (the highest value found is what is normally used), and on how well the beam is focused. It is not unusual for candlepower values to vary greatly from unit to unit on otherwise identical lights due to small differences in focusing or reflector tolerances.

    Ken Good from Strategos, Intl. Strategos International - Tactical Training and Equipment for Military and Law Enforcement Personnel put it this way:

    Lumens verse Candlepower

    "Lumen - Measurement of a quantity of light as perceived by the human eye. As a light source's color temperature increases, less light is required to achieve comparable brightness and visual acuity. The international unit to describe the quantity of light (also called luminous flux). - That's why SureFire uses this as a standard benchmark for all of our illumination tools.

    Candle Power (Candelas) Used by lighting designers to calculate the foot-candles illuminating a surface (C.P./distance in feet squared) or Lux illuminating a surface (C.P./distance in meters squared) Foot-candles -Measurement of light output in candela per square foot. It derives from the early English unit of foot-candle defined as the illuminance on a surface placed one foot from the standard candle. 100 foot-candles is generally considered enough light to perform most tasks. Lux - Measurement of light output in candelas per square meter. One lumen per square. 10 lux is generally considered enough light to perform most tasks.

    These terms are useful to assist in determining the "signature" of the illumination tool you are speaking about. No one term will fully describe the overall usefulness or quality of the emission. For instance, you can have a light with a tremendous candlepower rating at one point in the pattern, but the rest of the pattern in not useful. I.E. dark spots, splotchy, and/or weak."

    The standard in the industry and the light used at Perroni's Tactical Training Academy is the Surefire G2. For about $30.00 you have a solid flashlight with about 65 lumens.

    The next question I get asked is what about night sights? Or what kind do you use. In my opinion night sight are good in reduced light situations because they give you a visual reference of the front and rear sight and this can be helpful. I teach my students not to shoot until they have identified the target. For this in a reduced light situation you need a flashlight, otherwise you are just shooting off into the dark. My (2) key night sight points:

    1) Excellent tool to locate the main aiming point of your handgun.
    2) The sight is not the total answer to the problem; you must see and identify the threat first.
    Remember: Night Sights assist you in aiming! However they do not assist you in:

    1) Identifying targets
    2) Navigating
    3) Searching

    The flashlight is also useful for searching for subjects, as well as blinding them with light to shut down the OODA loop. As well as like we said earlier, target identification.

    However there are (3) things one must learn before the refinement of techniques and tactics they are;

    1) Reduce Telegraphing.
    2) Be acutely aware of being in or creating a Backlit condition for you or your team.
    3) Avoid blinding yourself or others.

    Also realize that if you are in a gunfight in low or reduced light and you are using a flashlight that if the Bad Guy is armed and committed, they will fire directly into the source of light.

    At that point you must distort your opponents perception of what is actually happening and where you are actual located. This is done by using the following:

    1) Displacement
    2) Angel of the Beam
    3) Rhythm and duration

    The reason this is so important is that you need to conceal your movement from your attacker. You need to train so that you can deploy both your flashlight and your handgun simultaneously and accurately. The shooter must be proficient with moving and shooting before they move on to moving and shooting in low light. Also remember running with a handgun or handgun and flashlight is bad.

    I also stress one handed shooting and training with one hand and yes, also working with the weak hand (Support Hand) as well. Because after all, when you are shooting with a flashlight in your hand you are shooting one handed.

    So with all that information let's talk about Hand Gun Shooting Techniques in Low or Reduced Light. What follows are some examples of shooting Techniques that can be employed with a flashlight. However remember, the Tactical Golden Rule that I am sharing with you is 'A' way to do the technique not 'THE' way to do the technique. Review the following with an open mind, try each technique on the range, but keep the one or ones that work best for you.


    Rogers Technique: Light is held between the fingers and activated by pressing against palm of hand see picture below.



    Harries Technique: Similar to Weaver stance, except the back of the support hand is pressed firmly against the back of the shooting hand. This enables the support hand to operate the flashlight while providing isometric stability to the shooting hand. See picture below.



    Ayoob Technique: Simply thrust both the light and the gun out to approximate an isosceles position, with both thumbs touching. Ayoob teaches that if you place both thumbs together in horizontal alignment out to about seven yards the light will shine in the assailant's eyes while the handgun is indexed on his chest. See picture below.



    FBI Technique: In the FBI technique, the flashlight is held away but much higher than the modified technique from the body with the non-weapon hand. The technique is simple but takes support away from the firing hand. See picture below.



    Weapon Mounted Lights: I am not a huge fan of weapon mounted lights the advantages are Support hand can be free. It's always there on the gun. The Disadvantage in my opinion are Searches- If you have a suspect at gunpoint how can you search for more suspects without taking the gun off the suspect?

    In summary I would like to reiterate a few key points: (They are as follows)Many flashlight techniques have been developed throughout the years. The ability to accurately engage targets in low-light conditions will always depend on the individual's skill to shoot their weapon with one hand. An operator should learn a variety of flashlight techniques, and train on these techniques regularly. However, the foundation of low-light training will always be learning the skill required to shoot their weapon with one hand.

    I have attempted to provide you nothing more than a skeleton of knowledge of how Flashlights & Night Sights work and a few Handgun Shooting Techniques. I urge you to do a few things:

    1) Practice Shooting with one hand (both strong & support hand)
    2) Practice shooting with your flashlight.
    3) Draw, Move, Shoot, Communicate!
    4) Shoot to stop the threat... don't stop shooting until there is no threat.
    5) Get a quality flashlight and carry it at all times.
    We have a saying at my training school: "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option.

    Always stay in condition yellow and when all else fails align the front sight and press the trigger and the button on your flashlight!"

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    Tom Perroni

    Tom Perroni is the owner, President and Chief Instructor of Perroni's Tactical Training Academy. Pulling on a five-year law enforcement operational background, Tom has spent the last fifteen years delivering training to government, military, law enforcement and private security companies. Tom is a NRA Certified Firearms Instructor and NRA Range Safety Office, Maryland State Police Handgun Instructor, Virginia DCJS Handgun, Shotgun and Advanced Handgun Instructor /Trainer for the PSS section. Tom is also a Contract Instructor for Blackwater Training Center.Tom is also the Training Director for Golden SEAL Enterprises .He is a member in Good standing with IALEFI & ILEETA. Tom appreciates feedback and can be reached through the Contact page on his company website at Perroni's Tactical Training Academy - Virginia Firearms Training or Golden Seal Enterprises

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array mojust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Willimantic Connecticut
    Posts
    624
    DCJS: I already know how to use a separate flashlight and pistol. My problem is that if I have a flashlight in one hand I have less control of the weapon. I prefer to shoot my .45 and .40 with both hands.

    In terms of searching for more than one opponent, shouldn't there be enough spill to spot them?

    I'm thinking of scenarios of waiting inside my bedroom, behind a chest, with my light trained on the door from the side, so that the intruder has to enter in profile to my POA.

    Thanks, by the way, for your feedback and experience.

  7. #7
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    CONUS
    Posts
    431
    mojust:

    In your case I would say training to shoot with one hand may be the answer. This will be useful for several reasons:

    1. If you master shooting with one hand then a technique like the harries technique will improve your accuracy!

    2. If for some reason you are unable to use one hand for any reason you have the confidence to fight and win with one hand!

    "In terms of searching for more than one opponent, shouldn't there be enough spill to spot them?"

    That is a good question that I don’t think anyone can answer....My response would be I would rather be safe than sorry...check, check and double check and never turn your back to an area that you have not thoroughly searched( with your light!)

    "I'm thinking of scenarios of waiting inside my bedroom, behind a chest, with my light trained on the door from the side, so that the intruder has to enter in profile to my POA."

    Good point but is this the only time you would use your light?

    What I teach is not THE way but A way of fighting with a flashlight and although you may not have a use for the methods or techniques now put them in your "tactical tool box" ...one day you just may need them! I wish you all the luck in your training endeavor you have a great attitude and that is half the battle!

    We have a saying at my training school: "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option. Always stay in condition yellow and when all else fails align the front sight and press the trigger and the button on your flashlight!”

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    P.S. Thank YOU for your feedback and experience!

    Tom Perroni

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array mojust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Willimantic Connecticut
    Posts
    624
    DCJS: good advice, especially about the one handed shooting.

    Thanks.

  9. #9
    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    370
    Having operated extensively in low-light environments, I am a strong proponent of weapon-mounted lights. A weapon-mounted light allows you to operate your weapon system faster and more efficiently than any handheld flashlight technique.

    That is not to say that an acceptable level of performance can not be delivered using a handeld light. Nor is the use of a weapon-mounted light an excuse not to be familiar with handheld techniques. I also believe that when using a weapon-mounted light, a handheld light also needs to be available.

    I do not consider the need to scan for additional threats a legitimate criticism. Having operated used a weapon-mounted light on countless occasions, I have never had insufficient light to identify other threats in the immediate area. The key is to manage the known threat(s) from cover until you can get assistance to dal with any additional potential threats. There is a limit to what one individual can do alone, regardless of the equipment being used.

    Whether you are using a handeld or weapon-mounted light, redirecting your light from a known threat to scan for additional threats strikes me as a bad idea. This not only divides my attention but also compromises my awareness of what the known threat is doing. Were I compelled to search for additional threats, I would much rather leave my weapon, and the light mounted on it, oriented on the known threat and use a handheld light to scan.

    The issue is not "handheld flashlight vs. weapon-mounted light." The reality is they are two distinct pieces of equipment that compliment one another. While either can be pressed into service as a replacement for the other, you benefit more by using both within their limitations as circumstances dictate.

  10. #10
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    CONUS
    Posts
    431
    Blackhawk6:

    All very good points!

    However remember one thing Baskin Robins has 31 flavors for a reason......

    I too have operated extensively in low-light environments and never used a weapon mounted light so I need to explore its usefulness! I am open to new techniques and tactics but anywhere I have trained I was taught that a weapon mounted light was a bullet magnet.

    I am doing a (Pro-Bono) "Low Light" training class in North Carolina for a Police Dept. I will work with a weapon mounted light in our "Low Light Force on Force" session and give you an AAR.

    What I teach is not THE way but A way of fighting with a flashlight and although you may not have a use for the methods or techniques now put them in your "tactical tool box" ...one day you just may need them!

    We have a saying at my training school: "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option. Always stay in condition yellow and when all else fails align the front sight and press the trigger and the button on your flashlight!

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    P.S. Thank YOU for your feedback and experience!

    Tom Perroni

  11. #11
    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    However remember one thing Baskin Robins has 31 flavors for a reason......
    True enough.

    I am open to new techniques and tactics but anywhere I have trained I was taught that a weapon mounted light was a bullet magnet.
    Used properly, it is no more of a bullet magnet than a handheld light. If you can employ a handheld light properly, the weapon-mounted light will not present a challenge.

    I am doing a (Pro-Bono) "Low Light" training class in North Carolina for a Police Dept. I will work with a weapon mounted light in our "Low Light Force on Force" session and give you an AAR.
    Keep in mind, all weapon-mounted lights are not created equal. Having a light with sufficient power and a switch that is easy to manipulate is key.

    If you are interesed in vetting the WML-concept in your course let me know. I have a number of drills I use that not only demonstrate the advantages of a WML, but also tax the shooters' skill with a handheld light.

    It usually takes about 30 minutes of range time before everyone is ready to trade their handheld lights in for WMLs. Once you progress to the shoothouse/FOF, everyone begins to appreciate their handheld lights again. When done properly, everyone walks away with a healthy respect for both pieces of equipment.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Weapon mounted light for OC?
    By NoNameMan in forum Open Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: March 25th, 2010, 09:01 AM
  2. Weapon Mounted Light while ccw
    By reyno2ac in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: February 22nd, 2010, 01:58 PM
  3. What Weapon Mounted Light?
    By eagle5 in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: May 23rd, 2008, 01:20 AM
  4. Would you carry a weapon mounted light?
    By wht06rado in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: April 27th, 2008, 03:12 PM
  5. Do I need A Weapon Mounted Light?
    By L8models in forum Defensive Carry Guns
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: February 10th, 2008, 06:20 AM

Search tags for this page

mounted light techniques

,
on what side should a weapon light be mounted?
,
pistol mounted light techniques
,
police tactics when using weapon mounted light
,
training with weapon mounted flashlight
,

weapon light technique

,

weapon light training

,

weapon mounted light tactics

,

weapon mounted light techniques

,

weapon mounted light training

,

weapon mounted tactical flashlight techniques

,
wml on pistol worth it
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors