Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun

Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun

This is a discussion on Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun By: Tom Perroni As I read the plethora of Handgun, Shooting, Combat, SWAT, magazines ...

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Thread: Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun

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    Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun

    Being able to hit what you aim at with a Handgun

    By: Tom Perroni

    As I read the plethora of Handgun, Shooting, Combat, SWAT, magazines I am perplexed. Everyone has their own style of training always use “One Hand” in a close or CQB situation. Always use “Two Hands” at a distance or use the Weaver stance, NO only use the “Isosceles” stance always do this never do that etc.

    I also read things like: Don’t train on square range. Force on Force is the only real way to learn combat shooting skills. Classroom Training “Talking” is for those who can’t really shoot ….just get out on the range and shoot. Combat Focus is the new wave of handgun training.

    What I have discovered is there is no shortage of experts on the subject of shooting. Just go to any Internet “Firearms” chat forum and see for yourself.

    So not wanting to be left out of the fun, I thought I would share my thoughts on how to hit what you aim at with a handgun for target practice or combat shooting situation.

    So if you want to be able to hit what you aim at with a handgun in any situation read the following:

    Stance:

    Each shooter, under the guidance of the Firearms Instructor, and consistent with safety must find the shooting stance which is best suited to them and provides the greatest degree of stability and accuracy for shooting. The shooter must be able to assume their stance instinctively, as a reflex action with minimal effort or conscious manipulation of their body. Having said that it is my opinion that the placement of your feet has absolutely nothing to do with where the bullet impacts the target. You shoot from the mid chest up so to speak. However you need to be able to Move, Shoot and Communicate. Getting off the X is very important in a gun fight. A high degree of control is necessary to deliver a rapid, accurate shot. Every individual is unique and possesses characteristics that are theirs alone. These characteristics include height, weight, muscular and skeletal development, degree of flexibility and more. Therefore, there can be no universal shooting stance that can be utilized by all people

    Grip:

    A proper grip aids in controlling recoil and muzzle flip. It also allows the shooter to obtain a second sight picture more rapidly. Hands must have a 360 degree grip around the weapon. This allows the shooter to engage targets more rapidly

    Grip is acquired in the holster, prior to draw and presentation. The web of the shooting hand must beat the top of the tang on the back-strap and no higher. If you are too high the slide will ‘bite” your hand. If you are to low with your grip you allow the gun to move more with recoil making sight recovery and follow-on shots more difficult and time-consuming. A key point is to have both thumbs pointing at your target. The heel of your non-shooting hand should cover the area on the grip that is exposed. You should squeeze the handgun with no more force than you would use to shake someone’s hand.

    The support hand applies pressure in exactly the same fashion. The idea behind the two hand grip is to completely encircle the grip of the gun in order to be in control of recoil. The support hand thumb will be on the same side of the gun as the weapon hand thumb. “Fingers over Fingers and Thumb over Thumb”. A good test of correct grip is; with your trigger finger off the trigger and placed along the slide it should be even or directly across the slide from your weak hand thumb also along the slide.


    Front Sight Focus:

    In order to get accurate hits on target you must have “Front Sight Focus”. First you must understand that your eye can only focus on one thing at a time….All to often we walk around all day looking at the “Big Picture” In order to be able to hit what we aim at with a handgun we must focus on the front sight 100% of the time
    Not the target. Not the rear sight the FRONT sight. I often hear student say the front sight looks a little fuzzy….I tell them that is o.k. give all of your attention to the front sight. But where on the Front Sight should you focus? The Top Edge is the answer. The object is to press the trigger to the rear while not moving the front sight off the target once the handgun fires. Each shot should be a surprise. Anticipation will cause trigger pull or trigger jerk. I will often tell my students to repeat “Front Sight, Front Sight, Front Sight, Front Sight until the shot breaks so that all of their attention is focused on the………Front Sight! I also tell my students that for every pull of the trigger they must have 2 sight pictures the one they had just before the shot broke and the one right after. They must have 2 sight pictures so if they fire 2 shots they need 3 sight pictures etc.

    Trigger Control / Press:

    Trigger Control in either double action or single action mode, it is defined as steady pressure exerted on the trigger straight to the rear to release the hammer and fire the weapon and immediately allowing the trigger to return so the weapon can be fired again. Descriptive term here is a press and not a squeeze. Note the trigger finger continually maintains contact with the trigger.

    When pressing the trigger, the shooter should use the tip of the index finger. This should be accomplished by utilizing a smooth movement isolating the trigger finger only. All other fingers must remain still during the trigger press. Another important part of trigger control is trigger reset. Once the trigger has been fired, slowly release pressure on the trigger until an audible click is heard and felt. At this point, the shooter need not release any more pressure on the trigger to fire again. This maintains a proper sight alignment and sight picture more easily.

    Trigger Manipulation

    •Speed at which the trigger is pulled – a single gear, one smooth continuous motion at a single speed… not increasing as you apply pressure.

    •The Motion in which the trigger is pulled – Is a smooth continuous motion, not a jerk, not a little at the time.

    •Always remember that you press or pull a trigger, you never jerk the trigger.

    The finger is placed so that the trigger is halfway between the tip of the finger and the first joint. “The trigger is pressed straight to the rear in a smooth continuous manner without disturbing sight alignment.” You should not be able to predict the instant the gun will fire. Each shot should come as a surprise. Note the trigger finger continually maintains contact with the trigger.

    Once the sights are aligned, the shooter must apply steady pressure to the trigger until a surprise break (hammer fall) occurs. The pressure is directed rearward with no interruptions, stalls or hesitations present. The proper trigger control allows the weapon to fire without disturbing the sights.

    To begin proper trigger control, the shooter must first properly place the index finger on the trigger. The index finger is placed in the middle of the trigger at the most rearward curved portion. The trigger should cross the finger approximately halfway between the tip of the finger and the first joint, over the swirl of the fingerprint.

    Trigger Press. After attaining proper placement of the finger on the trigger, proper trigger pressure can be applied to the trigger. There are three parts of trigger pressure each time the weapon is fired. They are Slack, Press, and Follow through.


    All three parts are important to proper trigger control.


    1.Slack. The shooter must first take up the slack at the beginning of the trigger movement by applying slight pressure to the trigger. The trigger will move slightly to the rear until the internal parts of the trigger mechanism come into full contact with each other, and the “softness” in the tip of the finger is eliminated.

    2.Press The trigger is then in the press portion of its movement, which is when the internal parts of the weapon are being disengaged from each other to allow the hammer to fall. The pressure should be a smooth, constant, and even pressure, applied straight to the rear so that the sights are not misaligned at the instant the hammer falls. Once the hammer begins to fall, the follow through portion of trigger control begins.

    3.Follow Through. Follow through is the continued steady pressure applied to the trigger until the trigger reaches its most rearward point of travel. If the shooter does not continue to apply the constant, even pressure during follow through, it is possible that the impact of the round could move on the target, thus spoiling an otherwise good shot.

    •On Glock handguns we us a technique called ‘Catching the Link” Once you have pressed the trigger to the rear hold the trigger until the slide cycles then let the trigger out until you hear a “CLICK” then you may follow through with another shot. What you have done is cut your trigger pull in half which makes you more accurate and increases the speed of follow up shots 80%.

    •Always finish the shot, never quit the shot.

    •Keep the gun at eye level doing the exact same thing as the shot breaks that you were doing prior to the shot; aligning the sights, maintaining target acquisition.

    •Maintain the gun in front of the eyes long enough to ask two questions:

    a. Did I hit the target?
    b. Did it work?

    Dry Fire:

    This when the trigger is pulled without live ammunition in the firearm.
    This method of training can be done just about anywhere and costs absolutely nothing. In this Instructors opinion it is vital to anyone who uses or carries a handgun. Essentially you are doing everything you would do at the range except your handgun is empty. (NO AMMO) The most important single fundamental skill in shooting - Trigger Control – is one which can best be improved off the range in dry practice. As I have stated in past articles all the fundamentals of Handgun shooting can be practiced with Dry Fire grip, sight alignment trigger control, malfunction drills, reload drills and all at no cost.

    Practicing the above drills for 10-15 minutes each day will greatly benefit the shooter. I have seen marked improvement in students who practiced these drills for just 2 days. However please remember Handgun Skills are like buying a car: if you do not make your payments the car will be repossessed. If you do not practice the new handgun skills you paid for they will also be repossessed.

    In conclusion remember smooth is fast, and speed is economy in motion; Accuracy always takes precedence over speed. Speed is fine but accuracy is final.

    Well there you have it. I think this would be a solid foundation for any shooter. You can learn a great deal from a Basic Class it’s the foundation of your shooting skills. So before you take that “ADVANCED HANDGUN COURSE” make sure you have a solid understanding of the Fundamentals of Handgun Shooting. Remember you have to crawl before you walk and walk before you run.

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

    And remember ; "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option".

    Tom Perroni

    I would also like to thank Chris Pick a new Instructor at Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy for his input on this article.

    Tom Perroni is the owner, President and Chief Instructor of Perroni's Tactical Training Academy. Pulling on a five-year law enforcement operational background, Tom has spent the last fifteen years delivering training to government, military, law enforcement and private security companies. Tom is also a Contract Instructor for Blackwater Training Center. Tom is also the Training Director for Golden SEAL Enterprises. Tom appreciates feedback and can be reached through the Contact page on his company website at Perroni's Tactical Training Academy - Virginia Firearms Training


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    Thanks for posting..That was some good reading!

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    Some good information there.
    I do disagree with a couple of things but, you have that somewhat covered by stating the fact that we all have our own individual idiosyncrasies.

    I personally think that most shooters lack adequate hand and finger strength.
    I think that most shooters grip their firearm far too lightly. Especially the semi-automatics.
    I also think that many large frame semi-automatic firearms (mostly 1911 pattern) have a "standard" stock trigger that is too long for most shooters.

    Hand and finger exercises in order to build great hand strength - combined with a shorter trigger and a much firmer grip would go a long way toward making for a better and more accurate defensive shooter.

    Strong hands and fingers allow for a firm grip without tremoring.
    A shorter trigger allows the "trigger face" to be pushed rearward with the very tip of the independently operating index finger - rather than attempting to pull the trigger face rearward with the tip of the finger which is what most shooters do....because they have no choice...because the trigger is too long & it's already on their firearm as factory issue.
    The "curse" of the three hole LONG trigger which even great shooters have subliminally forced themselves to learn to adapt to..because it was initially supposed to be a fantastic revolutionary improvement.
    But, the Three Hole Swiss Cheese Aluminum "custom" Long trigger was originally intended as a custom option for shooters with extra large hands. Whoops! everybody kinda forgot that fact in the "boom years" of the custom craze. But, I am going way back in history.
    Back then...The "cool factor" kicked in and everybody thought the three hole Aluminum Trigger looked COOL so it "took off" as a custom accessory add on.

    Folks forget that a shorter 1911 trigger (way WAY back when) was originally adopted because the longer trigger sucked and was an unnatural hindrance to good, accurate shooting for the great majority of shooters.
    Now, you're lucky if you can even find a medium or a short aftermarket trigger anywhere.


    Regardless...it's late. Just my personal opinion. I'm tired. Good thread ~ Good-night.
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    It never hurts to reread good instructions...
    Thanks for posting!

    Stay armed...practice/read...stay safe!
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    Some good information there.
    I do disagree with a couple of things but, you have that somewhat covered by stating the fact that we all have our own individual idiosyncrasies.

    I personally think that most shooters lack adequate hand and finger strength.
    I think that most shooters grip their firearm far too lightly. Especially the semi-automatics.
    I also think that many large frame semi-automatic firearms (mostly 1911 pattern) have a "standard" stock trigger that is too long for most shooters.

    Hand and finger exercises in order to build great hand strength - combined with a shorter trigger and a much firmer grip would go a long way toward making for a better and more accurate defensive shooter.

    Strong hands and fingers allow for a firm grip without tremoring.
    A shorter trigger allows the "trigger face" to be pushed rearward with the very tip of the independently operating index finger - rather than attempting to pull the trigger face rearward with the tip of the finger which is what most shooters do....because they have no choice...because the trigger is too long & it's already on their firearm as factory issue.
    The "curse" of the three hole LONG trigger which even great shooters have subliminally forced themselves to learn to adapt to..because it was initially supposed to be a fantastic revolutionary improvement.
    But, the Three Hole Swiss Cheese Aluminum "custom" Long trigger was originally intended as a custom option for shooters with extra large hands. Whoops! everybody kinda forgot that fact in the "boom years" of the custom craze. But, I am going way back in history.
    Back then...The "cool factor" kicked in and everybody thought the three hole Aluminum Trigger looked COOL so it "took off" as a custom accessory add on.

    Folks forget that a shorter 1911 trigger (way WAY back when) was originally adopted because the longer trigger sucked and was an unnatural hindrance to good, accurate shooting for the great majority of shooters.
    Now, you're lucky if you can even find a medium or a short aftermarket trigger anywhere.


    Regardless...it's late. Just my personal opinion. I'm tired. Good thread ~ Good-night.
    Very Good points!

    Here is an article I wrote on that isssue:

    Dealing with the Problem Shooter; Remedial Training

    By Tom Perroni

    My motivation for this article came from my experience as a Firearms Instructor Trainer. I teach several Firearms Instructor In-Service classes each year, and in each and every class the subject of “Remediation” comes up. Having attended several Firearms Instructor development courses myself, this is one area that is covered but not to the extent that I feel it should be. So what do you do when you have a problem shooter?

    Remediating the Problem Shooter Training This training generally takes only one to three days, depending upon the individual need of the officer. Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy staff can remediate up to five individuals per day on the same range. This limit permits maximum benefit and individual training time to each individual, while also maximizing cost benefits to the agency. The student to Instructor ratio is 1 to 1.

    General considerations. No two people learn at the same rate. Some flexibility and certain specific remedial provisions should be built into the program so that the marginal or initially poor shooter can receive extra attention without being stigmatized as a "problem shooter." Firearms instructors should recognize the physical differences between students of differing stature, weight, build, and strength. We use the “crawl, walk, run” method of instruction.

    Monitoring progress. It is important for the instructor to observe and monitor the progress of students in basic firearms training on a day-by-day basis. If, during basic training classes each day, a student fails to grasp the fundamentals or displays an inability to perform the required tasks, an instructor should coach the student in an attempt to analyze and overcome the problem. This can be done during breaks, after class, or in some cases by assigning an instructor to work one-on-one with the student while class is in progress. This individual attention will often eliminate the difficulties the student has encountered, instead of compounding them by pushing ahead in the training program before the basics are mastered. It should again be emphasized that a problem shooter should not be permitted to begin tactical or advanced levels of training until competence in basic skills is demonstrated. This training session is fully documented, and a court-ready report is provided to the agency.

    Documentation of Performance Problems and Remedial Efforts. As it becomes apparent that a particular student has a serious problem in training, the instructor should document the difficulties encountered and the efforts directed at correcting them. This may become necessary if the validity of the training program or the disqualification of the student is later challenged. If possible, try to have more than one instructor work with a problem student. A second instructor may find a way to solve the student's problem, may eliminate a problem caused by a personality conflict between the students and the original instructor, and will in any event help to document the difficulties and the remedial efforts made.

    Specific Remedial Exercises and Procedures. The first step in remedying a student's poor performance is to properly diagnose and analyze the nature of the problem. This will require careful observation of the student by the instructor, and is most easily done on a one-on-one basis. The instructor must understand that every student is an individual, and may require an individual approach to solve a learning problem. With this in mind, some of the remedial exercises which have been useful in dealing with the more common firearms training problems include the following:

    1. Inspection of Firearm and Equipment. The instructor should inspect the student's firearm, holster, and related equipment, test-firing the firearm if necessary, to rule out any possibility that the shooter's problem is due to defective, unserviceable, or improperly adjusted equipment.

    2. Confirmation of Proper Sight Picture and Master Eye. Student failure to achieve good accuracy is frequently the result of failure to understand or employ a proper sight picture. The instructor should first review proper sight picture with the student, using diagrams or other visual aids if at all possible, and confirm the student's understanding by having the student explain the type of sight picture he or she is seeing. Eye focus on the front sight, rather than on the target, should be emphasized, as should the proper point of aim on the target. If eye dominance may be the cause of the problem, the instructor should reconfirm the student's master eye, and be sure the student is using the master eye behind the sights. by use of an aiming device which allows the student to align a set of sights on a target, then move away from the device to allow the instructor to confirm that the student has properly aimed at the target. We have noticed that over 40% of the Law Enforcement officers we remediate at Perroni’s Tactical Training Academy have this problem.

    3. Dry Practice. Dry practice (also called "dry firing") is one of the best and most widely used methods for training trigger control, while improving trigger finger strength and grip strength at the same time. For best effectiveness, dry practice should be done at least once a day for 10-15 minutes in a safe area. Dry work can also be done to improve the draw, the reload (using empty magazines or dummy rounds), and quick assumption of firing positions (kneeling, pivots and turns, use of cover, etc. ). To avoid safety problems, safety precautions appropriate to dry practice should be covered with the recruits, and consideration should be given to issuing written guidelines for dry practice safety. We recommend Dry Practice to all of our students. This should be practiced on a daily basis. We also use this in our remediation training to fix students problems before we ever get to the range. Please also note that a laser device can also be a useful tool in diagnosing trigger control problems once the trigger is pulled if the laser moves
    (Red dot) the shot would have also been moved “point of aim is point of impact”.

    4. Ball and Dummy Exercises. Randomly alternating live rounds and empty cases in a revolver cylinder, or live and dummy rounds in a semi-automatic pistol magazine, will allow the instructor to conduct a "ball and dummy" exercise in which the student must maintain proper sight alignment and exercise proper trigger control without knowing whether or not the gun is actually going to fire. Flinching or yanking the trigger can easily be diagnosed in this manner, as it is readily apparent when not disguised by the recoil of a live cartridge. The ball and dummy exercise can be continued and/or repeated until the student is trained to pull the trigger smoothly, allowing the shot to break as a surprise without the student's anticipation, flinching, or jerking the trigger.

    5. Confidence Building. Students who are having problems achieving proper ability with their firearms are likely to develop confidence or attitude problems which can then, in and of themselves, become the primary obstacle in the path of effective remedial efforts. In conducting remedial work, the instructor should strive to build the student's confidence by having the student succeed at simple tasks first, then progress in relatively small increments toward the ultimate goal. Short distances, long (or no) time limits, and a supportive, encouraging instructor are good ways to get a student to achieve initial positive results upon which to build. (Start at the 3yard line move to 7yards and the 15 yards, etc).

    6. Grip Strengthening. Good grip and finger strength are especially important for good results with the handgun. A regular program of exercise with spring tension grippers or a rubber ball squeezed in the hand can help a student improve strength and marksmanship results at the same time. Grip devices which allow each finger to be exercised independent of the other fingers can be especially beneficial in allowing strength to be improved without training the hand to "milk" the handgun's grip while firing. As mentioned earlier, physical pre-testing at the entry level can help to identify those students who need to improve strength, so that remedial physical exercises can be started as early in the academy training program as possible.

    7. Wrist and Forearm Strengthening. Various devices are available to improve wrist and forearm strength. A simple one can be made by suspending a weight by a short length of rope tied to a section of broom handle or dowel rod. The student holds the rod horizontally between both hands at arm's length with the weight suspended from the rope, and rolls the rope up and down to develop wrist strength.

    8. Upper Arm and Shoulder Strengthening. Upper arm and shoulder strength are helpful, not only in handgun training but for use of shotgun and other shoulder weapons as well. Bench presses with a barbell, or dumbbell presses and lateral raises will develop the shoulder area. Pull-ups and pushups will improve upper body strength and provide muscular development of the shoulder area which helps to control recoil when firing the shotgun. Prior to weight training, the student should undergo a complete physical examination, and should be coached as to the safe and proper method of performing the various exercises. The Instructor must watch the student and not the target. To get a good understanding of what the student is doing wrong. Then you can look at the target to validate what the Instructor is watching the student do wrong. This Common Shooting Errors guide should give the instructor a reference..

    There are (7) Fundamentals of Handgun Shooting and in my opinion they are all equally import. They are:

    1. Stance
    2. Grip
    3. Sight Alignment
    4. Sight Picture
    5. Trigger Control
    6. Breathing
    7. Follow Through

    Each one must be mastered in order for the shooter to be accurate. I discus this in greater detail in my article Fundamental of Handgun Shooting. A good Firearms Instructor will have a remediation lesson plan and a remediation written policy.

    The most import advice I can give a Firearms Instructor is if the student is failing or not meeting the minimum standard. Go back to “Basics” do not assume they know anything. When we teach a student who has no experience why do you think they do so well?

    1.You started your Instruction from the very beginning and covered everything and taught them all of the “Basics”.

    2.They had no “Bad Habits” to fix or break.

    Also remember :

    “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”
    Benjamin Franklin

    As a Firearms Instructor it is your job to teach your student / officer how to shoot. “Anyone can call the line it takes a Firearms Instructor to fix what is not working when it comes to shooting”.

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!


    Tom Perroni is the owner, President and Chief Instructor of Perroni's Tactical Training Academy. Pulling on a five-year law enforcement operational background, Tom has spent the last fifteen years delivering training to government, military, law enforcement and private security companies. Tom is the Training Director for Golden SEAL Enterprises Inc. Golden Seal Enterprises. Tom is also a Contract Instructor for Blackwater Training Center. Tom appreciates feedback and can be reached through the Contact page on his company website at Perroni's Tactical Training Academy - Virginia Firearms Training.

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    Thumbs up

    Thread Post #5 (directly above) =

    You got it covered. ~~~~>
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    Thanks for the post, all good reading
    I believe in gun control...... Thats why I use TWO hands.

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    Thanks for sharing the literature [in a copyright obsessive world!]

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    My problem is that my trigger pull when dry firing is much better than at the range. I think it's because I'm more relaxed dry firing, but with ammo I anticipate the shot and pull improperly.
    That's right, this sweet baby was made in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Retails for about a hundred and nine, ninety five. It's got a walnut stock, cobalt blue steel, and a hair trigger. That's right. Shop smart. Shop S-Mart. You got that?

    http://www.nevadashooters.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by whyipackmy45 View Post
    My problem is that my trigger pull when dry firing is much better than at the range. I think it's because I'm more relaxed dry firing, but with ammo I anticipate the shot and pull improperly.

    “Dry Fire, Dry Practice, Dry Firing”

    By: Tom Perroni

    The motivation from this article came from a discussion I had with several firearms instructors. We were discussing the fact that some of the veteran officers who had recently come to the range to qualify were having problems with low scores. The same officers fresh out of training had much higher scores.

    So the question was asked to the veteran and rookies: How often do you practice? The answer was not very often… The follow up question was how come? The answer was that going to the range was expensive and the officer simply did not have the funds available to practice on his or her own time. I was shocked since most of the training at my Academy is for Law Enforcement and Private Security. These folks are paid to deal with Deadly Force situations. And the Handgun is the most important tool of their trade. With their lives and the lives of the public at stake they should be at the very least proficient with this tool.

    So my follow up question was have you ever heard of or practiced Dry Firing or Dry Practice? I was again surprised by the puzzled looks on the faces of these officers. One officer finally said, “What is Dry Firing?”

    Dry Fire – This when the trigger is pulled without live ammunition in the firearm. This method of training can be done just about anywhere and costs absolutely nothing. In this Instructors opinion it is vital to anyone who uses or carries a handgun. Essentially you are doing everything you would do at the range except your handgun is empty. (NO AMMO) The most important single fundamental skill in shooting - Trigger Control – is one which can best be improved off the range in dry practice. As I have stated in past articles there are (7) fundamentals of Handgun shooting which all can be practiced with Dry Fire.

    Tips to get you Started

    1. Safety: This is the most import facet of Dry Fire practice! Make sure the Handgun is UNLOADED! Make sure that all live ammo is out of the room or area you will be training in. Also make sure you have a suitable backstop. The use of snap caps is up to the shooter. Some people feel they protect the firing pin. However you can fire most modern firearms without causing any damage to the fringing pin or the action of the handgun. Consult your owner’s manual to be sure.

    2. Targets: This is left up to the individual. You may use anything you like B-27 or an FBI –Q or life-size human target or a 3X5 index card or a spot on the wall; you will however need a reference point to aim at. This is important.

    3. What should be practiced? I suggest practicing everything you do at the range - all seven fundamentals of marksmanship:

    1. Stance
    2. Grip
    3. Sight Alignment
    4. Sight Picture
    5. Trigger Control / Press
    6. Breathing
    7. Follow Through

    Also the draw which has (5) points, as well as reloading and safe high speed gun handling. There are several types of Reloads that can also be practiced.

    A. 5 Points to the Draw

    1.The firing hand secures a firing grip on the handgun while the support hand touches flat to the abdomen.

    2.The handgun is lifted straight up until it just clears the top of the holster. The trigger finger is straight on the Handgun. The support hand is still flat against the abdomen. The hand and the forearm are in line with the handgun.

    3.The firing side elbow drops and the muzzle points directly toward the target. The support hand is still flat against the abdomen. The trigger finger is straight.

    4.The handgun starts toward the target and the support hand establishes the proper grip. The muzzle never covers any part of the body. The trigger finger is still straight. The hands come together fingers over fingers and thumb over thumb.

    5.The handgun is at eye level and the finger is on the trigger.

    Then we place the handgun back in the holster in the exact reverse order while maintaining eye contact with the target. “Do not look at the holster.”


    B. Speed Reloads: These drills help develop muscle memory. Press the magazine release to drop the magazine while at the same time with the non shooting hand grab the fresh magazine from its pouch, indexed with your finger, and insert into the magazine well. If this is done correctly the magazines will pass each other in mid air.

    C. Tap-Rack-Fight this drill clears malfunctions and or Jams and effectively “resets” the firearm.

    Tap- means to smack the bottom of the magazine firmly enough to lock it into place or dislodge any bind in the magazine.

    Rack- is a cycling of the slide to eject any hammered or dead casing or to re-chamber a new cartridge following a malfunction.

    Fight- means being prepared to commence or resume fire as required by assessing the situation.

    (These maneuvers most be able to be performed flawlessly and subconsciously any time the shooter experiences a failure to fire or malfunction)


    3. How often should I practice “Dry Fire”?

    Practicing the above drills for 10-15 minutes each day will greatly benefit the shooter. I have seen marked improvement in students who practiced these drills for just 2 days. However please remember Handgun Skills are like buying a car: if you do not make your payments the car will be repossessed. If you do not practice the new handgun skills you paid for they will also be repossessed.

    In conclusion remember smooth is fast, and speed is economy in motion; Accuracy always takes precedence over speed. As John Skaggs from the Chapman Academy says “You should own two guns . One you wear out dry-firing and the other you shoot with.”

    I urge you to spend the minimal time required to develop your “Dry Fire” skills with this cost-free method that will improve your life saving skills.

    Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!


    Tom Perroni is the owner, President and Chief Instructor of Perroni's Tactical Training Academy. Pulling on a five-year law enforcement operational background, Tom has spent the last fifteen years delivering training to government, military, law enforcement and private security companies. Tom is also a Contract Instructor for Blackwater Training Center. Tom appreciates feedback and can be reached through the Contact page on his company website at Perroni's Tactical Training Academy - Virginia Firearms Training

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array Matthew Temkin's Avatar
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    Tom..great stuff and it is spot on with how I teach basic-intermediate classes.
    My only beef is that you state one must have front sight focus to hit the target.
    My response is..it depends.
    I am a big advocate of point shooting combined with sighted shooting.
    And to answer your GT question..no.
    I have never been in a gun fight.
    But quite a few of my students--and my students students--have and they reported excellent hits/results with threat focused shooting.
    Hopefully we can spend some range time together and compare notes.

  12. #12
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    Matt,

    Anytime you are teaching point shooting let me know because I would train with you anytime. I would love to add more tools to my tactical tool box!

    You are also welcome to attend any training I am giving so let me know!

    Tom Perroni

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array Matthew Temkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    Matt,

    Anytime you are teaching point shooting let me know because I would train with you anytime. I would love to add more tools to my tactical tool box!

    You are also welcome to attend any training I am giving so let me know!

    Tom Perroni
    Will do.
    I should be in Northern VA in the early Fall.
    If that falls through, then attending one of your classes would be a good excuse for a road trip.

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