One handed pistol shooting

One handed pistol shooting

This is a discussion on One handed pistol shooting within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have a confession to make: I really suck at one-handed pistol shooting. When I first shot the Glock 17 in a more training manner ...

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Thread: One handed pistol shooting

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array BAC's Avatar
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    One handed pistol shooting

    I have a confession to make: I really suck at one-handed pistol shooting.

    When I first shot the Glock 17 in a more training manner than range plinking manner, I fooled around with one-handed shooting only a little. I was comfortable I could hit the silhouette at 9 yards so I was content. Now that I'm becoming more involved in practicing with my own handgun, a full-size 1911, I'm noticing a very different outcome when I try to shoot one-handed.

    My primary problem is sight alignment; I can't hold the sights steady worth a damn. Two hands and I'm rock solid, but one hand and it feels incredibly awkward. As I type this, I've been dry firing the gun for the last ten minutes, trying to figure out a way to get "on target" quickly using only one-hand, and I'm positive there is some way to train myself to do better holding the pistol steady with one hand (short of holding a weight out in one hand for a couple minutes at a time as a form of exercise, that is). Thin I might be, but I certainly don't see myself as weak, which is why this bugs me to no end.

    The reason I'm concerned about one-handed shooting, specifically, is because I can very easily envision a situation where one would be required to use only one hand: if you take a fall and injure a hand, if you are trying to ward off an attacker with one hand, if you're already holding something in one hand, etc. Or if, like me, you just happen to sprain a wrist by being stupid while exercising.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for ways to improve one-handed shooting? Drills, exercises, general tips?


    -B


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    I point shoot at ranges of less than 10-15 meters. I use a two handed stance, but I use some of the basic's taught here

    Shooting to Live written by Sykes and Fairbarin almost 100 years ago.

    It's a PDF so print it out and read it, practice and then see if you can find a class somewhere.
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    Senior Member Array MilitaryPower's Avatar
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    I have the same problem, so feedback is appreciated. I usually carry my Walther PPS as my BUG on my weak side, so I practice with my left hand only sometimes (sometimes switching it over to my right to both) and holy crap! I tilt the gun in about 15 degrees so I can see the sights better, but the recoil to the high right is crazy.
    Gun control can be blamed in part for allowing 9/11 to happen.
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    One - Handed Pistol Shooting

    Team-

    Some tips that may help!

    1.Canting the weapon slightly (5-10 degrees) No more than that!

    2.Keep weight biased forward on the balls of the feet.

    3.Secure the non-firing arm by tucking it against the torso to
    prevent it from causing a pendulum effect.

    4. Keep the hand that is shooting high in the back strap with a firm grip.

    5. Breath while you are shooting.

    Hope this helps! if you have specific questions shoot me a PM.

    Tom Perroni

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    VIP Member Array BAC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgrass101 View Post
    I point shoot at ranges of less than 10-15 meters. I use a two handed stance, but I use some of the basic's taught here

    Shooting to Live written by Sykes and Fairbarin almost 100 years ago.

    It's a PDF so print it out and read it, practice and then see if you can find a class somewhere.
    Interesting material. Much of it is outdated, bu I can see how it was "cutting edge" at the time (early 40s). I'll try out the hand positioning and see how it does this weekend at the range.


    -B

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    A few other tips:

    1. Apply slightly more pressure with the middle finger of the shooting hand than you normally would.

    2. Place your firing-side foot forward. This will require you to step forward with the firing-side foot or step back with the non-firing-side foot. Practice both.

    3. Index your chin with the firing-side shoulder. It should be similar to the cheek-stock weld you would use if firing a rifle.

    4. Keep the firing arm straight, but not locked.

    5. In my experience, canting the gun helps get a good first round hit. However, keeping the gun vertical allows faster subsequent hits and, with a little effort, can deliver a first round hit as quickly/accurately as canting the gun.

    My dry-fire program includes 25 repetitions from the ready, both strong and weak hand, and 10 repetitions from the holster, strong-hand only.

    Live-fire drills that are beneficial:

    1. One round from the ready, strong-hand only (1 sec. par time)

    2. One round from the ready, weak-hand only (1 sec. par time)

    3. One round from the holster, strong-hand only (1.5 sec par time)

    4. Transition Drill: Two rounds from the ready, strong-hand only, transition gun to weak hand, two rounds weak-hand only (4.5 sec par time)

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    Senior Member Array Rhome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    Team-

    Some tips that may help!

    1.Canting the weapon slightly (5-10 degrees) No more than that!

    2.Keep weight biased forward on the balls of the feet.

    3.Secure the non-firing arm by tucking it against the torso to
    prevent it from causing a pendulum effect.

    4. Keep the hand that is shooting high in the back strap with a firm grip.

    5. Breath while you are shooting.

    Hope this helps! if you have specific questions shoot me a PM.

    Tom Perroni
    +1
    Works for me both strong hand and week hand.
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    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAC View Post
    Interesting material. Much of it is outdated, bu I can see how it was "cutting edge" at the time (early 40s). I'll try out the hand positioning and see how it does this weekend at the range.


    -B

    Correction,

    Some of it is outdated. These guys knew more about gunfighting than most of the trainers alive today.

    They studied 666 gunfights over a twelve year period. These guys knew their stuff! I read that book at least once a year. The amount of quality information in this little book is simply astounding. This stuff is making a huge comeback now that we are back at war.

    What was old, is new again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BAC View Post
    Does anyone have any suggestions for ways to improve one-handed shooting? Drills, exercises, general tips?
    Are you consistently missing to the right left high low or are you all over the place? Do you have a laser? They help you see what it is you are doing. It is best if you have an observer while you shoot because you will not see the laser movement as well as another person focused on just the dot. You may want to sight the laser so that the dot is right in front of your front sight so that you really do not see it while you use your sights, because some folks get distracted trying to keep the dot rock steady. Using a laser in conjunction with iron sights to aim gets you into some bad habits, IMO. Lasers are not intended to be used like that, but that is a whole different topic. In this case you are not using it to sight at all. It is to help the observer to see what is going on as you squeeze the trigger.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAC View Post
    I have a confession to make: I really suck at one-handed pistol shooting.

    When I first shot the Glock 17 in a more training manner than range plinking manner, I fooled around with one-handed shooting only a little. I was comfortable I could hit the silhouette at 9 yards so I was content. Now that I'm becoming more involved in practicing with my own handgun, a full-size 1911, I'm noticing a very different outcome when I try to shoot one-handed.

    My primary problem is sight alignment; I can't hold the sights steady worth a damn. Two hands and I'm rock solid, but one hand and it feels incredibly awkward. As I type this, I've been dry firing the gun for the last ten minutes, trying to figure out a way to get "on target" quickly using only one-hand, and I'm positive there is some way to train myself to do better holding the pistol steady with one hand (short of holding a weight out in one hand for a couple minutes at a time as a form of exercise, that is). Thin I might be, but I certainly don't see myself as weak, which is why this bugs me to no end.

    The reason I'm concerned about one-handed shooting, specifically, is because I can very easily envision a situation where one would be required to use only one hand: if you take a fall and injure a hand, if you are trying to ward off an attacker with one hand, if you're already holding something in one hand, etc. Or if, like me, you just happen to sprain a wrist by being stupid while exercising.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for ways to improve one-handed shooting? Drills, exercises, general tips?


    -B

    B-

    I am not sure if this will work for you....However I will be holding a Basic Pistol Course (1 day) & Advanced Handgun Course (2 days) in May you are welcome to come to either or both for FREE if you write an AAR about the class. I am also able to help with lodging.

    Shot me a PM ( No pun intended)
    Tom Perroni

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    B-

    I am not sure if this will work for you....However I will be holding a Basic Pistol Course (1 day) & Advanced Handgun Course (2 days) in May you are welcome to come to either or both for FREE if you write an AAR about the class. I am also able to help with lodging.

    Shot me a PM ( No pun intended)
    Tom Perroni
    Ooooh. Color me interested. PM inbound.


    -B

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    kpw
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    One more thing to add... practice. It's hard to do something well without doing it often.

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    KPW, I couldn’t agree more. Lest we forget that dry work is just as important as wet, so do a good deal of it and daily. Once you reload the weapon you are finished though…we don’t want ya to get hurt.

    Moreover, if possible, practice live-fire in a relaxed atmosphere and informally. Play with the techniques and see what works best for your body. Dancing pop cans from the ½ or ¾ hip position is good training, rewarding, and a lot of fun. Do you main work with a .22 to save ammo costs and gain confidence. Then end your session with your carry piece. This seems to be working well for me and it makes practice pleasurable.

    I’d also have to do a plug for “Shooting To Live” and “Kill Or Get Killed“ in so far as a great tutorial is concerned. Another good one is “Bull’s Eyes Don’t Shoot Back”, Col. Applegate’s last work. Obviously skip the unnecessary material from STL, nevertheless, for form, function, and “how-to”, they’re hard to beat.
    Take Care and Stay Safe,
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  14. #14
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    Interesting material. Much of it is outdated, bu I can see how it was "cutting edge" at the time (early 40s).

    What worked on the streets in the 30's and 40's is still valid today. Shanghai in the 30's was the most dangerous city in the world. These skills kept officers alive on the streets then and would still work today if trained and utilized.

    What didn't work then doesn't work now either.

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  15. #15
    VIP Member Array BAC's Avatar
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    In my defense, since it's come up now, my "outdated" comment was limited only to the manner of carry and drawing the weapon, not tactics used. I've been practicing (dry-firing) using some of those just to try them out, so I'm certainly not object to the techniques themselves.

    I'm looking forward to taking a course (such as that Mr. Perroni offered) to really get familiar with use of my handgun, but even after practice I'm still not quite comfortable with one-handed use and keep trying to bring my off-hand up for a proper grip.

    On the up-side, another range trip confirms that I'm getting more accurate. Here's hoping that carries over to one-hand use.


    -B

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