Malfunction clearing

This is a discussion on Malfunction clearing within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This video is from James Yeager of Tactical Response and addresses the 3 types of malfunctions in a semi-auto pistol and how to deal with ...

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Thread: Malfunction clearing

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array KenpoTex's Avatar
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    Malfunction clearing

    This video is from James Yeager of Tactical Response and addresses the 3 types of malfunctions in a semi-auto pistol and how to deal with them.

    YouTube - Malfunction Clearing for a Pistol
    "Being a predator isn't always comfortable but the only other option is to be prey. That is not an acceptable option." ~Phil Messina

    If you carry in Condition 3, you have two empty chambers. One in the weapon...the other between your ears.

    Matt K.

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    Thumbs up

    Nice find and great addition for the forum Matt.

    Lots of new members here these past few weeks and I hope they will take some time out to watch it.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    STOPPAGE HANDOUT

    By: Tom Perroni

    Stoppage - Anything that interrupts the firing cycle.

    A. Failure to feed - When Round fails to chamber completely.

    1. Magazine not seated completely

    2. Bad ammunition

    3. Damaged magazine - magazine follower, spring, lips, body

    4. Dirty weapon - insufficient lubrication


    B. Failure to Fire - The trigger is pressed, the firing mechanism functions but the weapon does not fire.

    1. No round in chamber

    2. Bad round in chamber

    3. Slide out of battery

    4. Damaged Weapon

    a. Firing Pin
    b. Hammer Spring


    C. Fail to Extract - The weapon fires, but the case stays in the chamber.
    (AKA Double Feed)

    1. Debris under extractor (maintenance)

    2. Bad Ammunition (case rim)

    3. Broken extractor


    D. Fail to Eject - The weapon fires but the fired cartridge case is caught between the bolt fact of the slide and the chamber portion of the barrel.

    1. Shooter Induced

    a. Limp wrist

    b. Arms not locked

    2. Bad Ammunition

    a. No power to operate slide

    3. Broken extractor

    4. Dirty Weapon - insufficient lubrication


    STOPPAGE CLASSIFICATIONS

    I. Phase I Non mechanical stoppages that can be quickly cleared: No round in chamber, bad round, magazine not seated, stovepipe.

    A. Failure to feed

    B. Failure to fire

    C. Failure to eject


    II. Phase II Non Mechanical stoppages that can be cleared but require more time. Double feed/two failures to fire.

    A. Failure to extract


    III. Phase III Mechanical failures that require a departmental Armorer to correct.

    A. Breakage

    B. Wear


    Daily inspection and periodic firing and cleaning will help avert having a Phase III stoppage at an inopportune time.
    HOW TO CLEAR A STOPPAGE

    I. Phase I Clears the Majority of all stoppages 1.5 - 3 seconds

    A. TAP the magazine with the off hand in the same manner as when loading the weapon

    B. RACK the slide in the same manner as when chambering a round.

    C. FIGHT if situation still warrants press the trigger.


    II. Phase II the Phase I clearance drill will clear the majority of all NON mechanical stoppages. If the Phase I drill does not clear your weapon, do not waste time trying it again, find cover if you are not tactically safe. Use back up weapon/shotgun. If your life is not immediately in jeopardy, go to Phase II - 8-12 seconds.

    A. Lock the slide open, RIP magazine out and let it fall to ground OR...

    1.Because you are tactically safe, you should try to save it.

    2. It is mandatory that you save the magazine if it is the last
    one you have.

    B. RACK the slide twice to clear malfunction

    C. RELOAD insert fresh magazine and chamber round

    III. Phase III a stoppage with the slide stuck forward

    1. Release magazine

    2. Use support hand to firmly grasp slide over ejection port

    3. Using the web of the weapon hand drive “through” the grip, forcing the slide to move

    4. Once cleared, reload

    All clearance drills must be done with finger out of trigger guard to prevent unintentional discharges. It is imperative that your shooting wrist and arm be rigid to prevent creating a double feed.

  5. #4
    VIP Member Array Rob99VMI04's Avatar
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    IMHO..... The type I , II , or III malfunctions if its real close imminient danger! I.E. a attack on you on the streets. Yeah its nice knowing these but I would probably estimate that unless the attention is off of you and on something else, its nice knowing how to do these but I do not practice them for a simple reason.

    TAP! RACK! RE Assess! if you have to still BANG!
    TAP (Tap the bottom of the magazine)
    Rack (Rack the slide or charging handle)
    RE-Assess (If the threat has procluded to end the attack you don't shoot, if the threat still is coming BANG)

    Something real close and personal if you try anything else your probably in big trouble......... IF TAP RACK ASSESS dosn't work.....The Item in your hand is no longer a bullet launcher but is NOW A HAMMER!!!! and use the legs god gave you. -
    “Are you a thermometer or a thermostat, do you reflect or become what is happening in the room or do you change the atmosphere, reset the temperature when you come into the room”?--Chuck Swindoll

    Its not about guns...Its about Freedom!

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    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
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    Rob,

    can you expound on this "RE-Assess (If the threat has procluded to end the attack you don't shoot, if the threat still is coming BANG)"

    I am not sure I fully understand.


    The fastest re-load or I.A.D. is a back-up gun!


    Tom Perroni

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array Rob99VMI04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    Rob,

    can you expound on this "RE-Assess (If the threat has procluded to end the attack you don't shoot, if the threat still is coming BANG)"

    I am not sure I fully understand.


    The fastest re-load or I.A.D. is a back-up gun!


    Tom Perroni
    Tom,
    In lou of Tap rack BANG. You can use what ever terminology you want to on bang or re-assess; however, working the civilian side and talking to a few lawyers from a civilian side of things " TAP, RACK, BANG could possible lead you into further troubles down the road. If you train properly tap rack and re-asses can be performed very rapidly; however, practing gross motor skills of TAP RACK BANG while the guy has his hands in the air and his homies are witnessing could lead to further trouble. Its problem that exist in the overall scheme of saying there is ONE right way.

    I believe in certain ways of being "Most" effective; however, I also believe in playing the odds that are greater on the best chance of survival and winning a future law suit civilly secondly. Believe me if a LE person is attacked I believe in the that all things out the window, and that all respect for that LE officer are out the window and that whatever actions taken by that person are probably appropriate. However, to protect a citizen civilly and criminally they are actually held to a differn't standard. That standard is actually held HIGHER then a LE officer which is unfortunate but true.

    Civilians do not enjoy the same protection that somebody with credentials enjoys while enforcing the law or constitution.

    IMHO and most courts exspecially in Virginia do not have castle doctorine and have the DUTY to retreat/ make / make decisions faster and more liable then LE officers/ Military folks enjoy ( more like have the ability to excersise) that your average civilian carrying a gun do.

    Civilians in VA have to exersise more judgment as to NOT drop the hammer then cops do in the commonwealth. In order to avoid prosecution/ civil liability. I know most people practice common sense man doctrine which to you and I makes COMPLETE sense. However, to 12 peers/jurors/people/ possible gun haters/idoits they may not see it the same.
    “Are you a thermometer or a thermostat, do you reflect or become what is happening in the room or do you change the atmosphere, reset the temperature when you come into the room”?--Chuck Swindoll

    Its not about guns...Its about Freedom!

  8. #7
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    Rob,


    Thanks for the response.

    However let’s try this on for size...

    In order for any citizen to have the need to do a malfunction drill while in a gunfight they must first have the following:

    Ability
    Opportunity
    Jeopardy
    Preclusion

    In the commonwealth or any state for that matter once this is established you have the grounds to defend yourself.

    IMHO if you are in a gunfight and must complete an IAD do you really think the perp will be giving up the fight when your gun malfunctions more importantly will he have time to "Give Up” how long will it take to do an IAD 1-3 seconds? I train LE and civilians in this very situation.
    I suggest that anyone who carries a firearm for defensive purposes work with FOF scenarios. We teach LE that it takes 1.5 sec for a perp to cover 7 yards or 21 feet running at the officer. But when in a gunfight and we do an IAD we must assess before you pull the trigger again?

    I am not a lawyer just a firearms instructor but I say if you hesitate you will die.

    Tom

  9. #8
    Member Array rumblefish's Avatar
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    I've found the following video to be helpful.

    Click on the solid arrow on the video screen.

    American Handgunner Web Blast

  10. #9
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    rumblefish,

    Thanks! nice video!

    I have trained with Clint! This just proves my point thanks!

    I have also trained with James Yeagor he is Good to go as well!

    Tom

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array Rob99VMI04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCJS Instructor View Post
    Rob,


    Thanks for the response.

    However let’s try this on for size...

    In order for any citizen to have the need to do a malfunction drill while in a gunfight they must first have the following:

    Ability
    Opportunity
    Jeopardy
    Preclusion

    In the commonwealth or any state for that matter once this is established you have the grounds to defend yourself.

    IMHO if you are in a gunfight and must complete an IAD do you really think the perp will be giving up the fight when your gun malfunctions more importantly will he have time to "Give Up” how long will it take to do an IAD 1-3 seconds? I train LE and civilians in this very situation.
    I suggest that anyone who carries a firearm for defensive purposes work with FOF scenarios. We teach LE that it takes 1.5 sec for a perp to cover 7 yards or 21 feet running at the officer. But when in a gunfight and we do an IAD we must assess before you pull the trigger again?

    I am not a lawyer just a firearms instructor but I say if you hesitate you will die.

    Tom
    Lets be honost most people don't know how to nor practice how to fire from a retentive position. So why make it more complicated and have people have to think about something more than they have to. Most people go to a static range and try to cut out the x ring. However, for self defense/ surving a deadly encounter thats not whats needed the majority of the time.

    I suggest that people that take the leap and carry a gun for self defense should not train 100% around said system.

    Don't get me wrong a New York reload is the best alternative to your primary failing; however, I also realize that most people don't have the financial ability to afford training/ good training to a back up gun. However, I also realize that not everybody falls into the same catagory of having the luxery of being able to afford training on a good BUG and or BUG. In that case the best alternative to that is good old hand to hand or using a object to incure blunt force trauma. Yes, most modern guns will probably work just fine; however, when the clock is ticking and your by yourself!!!!! Focusing, on how to clear a type III malfunction probably isn't the best alternative for a civilian expecially since that now its real close and personal.
    “Are you a thermometer or a thermostat, do you reflect or become what is happening in the room or do you change the atmosphere, reset the temperature when you come into the room”?--Chuck Swindoll

    Its not about guns...Its about Freedom!

  12. #11
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    Good video! Thanks!
    Keep emotionally active. Cater to your favorite neurosis.

  13. #12
    Member Array Randy's Avatar
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    Interesting discussion....

    IMHO if you are in a gunfight and must complete an IAD do you really think the perp will be giving up the fight when your gun malfunctions more importantly will he have time to "Give Up” how long will it take to do an IAD 1-3 seconds?
    It is often stated by the pro-gun organizations that there are somewhere between .5 million and 2.5 million citizen self defensive uses of a handgun each year and that in the vast majority of these events no shots are fired and the events are usually not reported to the police.

    If we can believe that some number in this large range is true and accurate, I think we can safely say that it means a lot of assailants don't want to get shot.

    The question that needs to be answered is "How many of these citizen self defensive uses of a handgun result in the citizen being physically attacked once the assailant finds out the intended victim has a handgun and the intended victim has either tried to shoot or has shot? I would venture to guess, and this is only a guess: "not very many."

    To answer the question you posed, I think the far majority of assailants will give up as soon as they realize their victim has a gun and will never know if said victim's gun had a stoppage at all.

    I train LE and civilians in this very situation.
    I suggest that anyone who carries a firearm for defensive purposes work with FOF scenarios. We teach LE that it takes 1.5 sec for a perp to cover 7 yards or 21 feet running at the officer. But when in a gunfight and we do an IAD we must assess before you pull the trigger again?
    Our department also trains Tap, Rack, Reacquire, Reassess. The underlying reason being, you do not pull the trigger until you have made the *conscious* decision to fire. Training to fire immediately and reflexively after clearing a stoppage can result in firing when you don't need to do so. This applies equally to citizens and LE alike.

    Pretty much all training has unintended consequences. It is prudent to design your training course so these consequences are not detrimental towards your overall goal.

    ... I say if you hesitate you will die.
    Unfortunately, that can be very true too, depending upon the circumstances.

    So we need to establish a middle-ground or find a balance from which it is 'safe' to operate. On one end is not enough force soon enough and on the other end is excessive force. As you mentioned the AOJP analysis earlier, the person must be able to articulate the justification they had as to why they shot when they shot. I am not a lawyer either but firing because "in all of my training I was taught to immediately shoot after clearing a stoppage" doesn't sound like it will pass the muster of AOJP.

    I am also a firm believer in FoF training. What you will find with someone charging you from 21 feet is that even if you have time to shoot, you're still going to get cut, stabbed, and/or knocked on your rear. The initial movement you make to get off the line of attack, once the threat is recognized as such, is much more important to your survival than just immediately drawing and shooting. While this is interesting, and even something we do in the citizen training classes, this isn't really common to citizen self defensive uses of the handgun. I like and utilize the drill because it readily demonstrates three other lessons; the Boyd loop, the importance of movement, and one I'll leave unmentioned (Rob will see this soon for himself and I don't want to spoil the experience).

    In the situation where your gun has a stoppage and the assailant is close and continuing the attack, your handgun also very quickly makes an excellent striking device; if you have the presence of mind to use it as such. Again, this one does not appear to be a real commonplace occurrence to the citizen self defensive uses of the handgun but may be beneficial to someone in LE.

    Randy

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    Randy,

    As always you make very good points.

    My thought process is this:

    In a gun fight we should be in condition RED:

    Red is the fight mode. It is where you carry out the decision you made in orange. Here, you are like a machine. You don't have to think. The decision and course of action have already been made, and the execution of your technique will not be hindered by indecision. You won't be saying, "I can't believe this is really happening".

    You will not have been surprised. You will have seen the dirt-bag making his move toward you in yellow, established a course of action to follow in orange, and carried out that action in red. The only person who will be surprised is your would-be assailant.

    This confirms your Boyd loop (OODA Loop) statement. Just remember it is called a loop for a reason we are constantly taking in information and making decisions. But if we hesitate we will die.

    When in the Gunfight you will not rise to the occasion you will default to the level of training you have mastered.

    We also need to convey to our students what really happens in a gun fight:

    You get the adrenalin dump
    Your vision narrows (tunnel vision)
    Your heart rate increases
    You get auditory dis-clusion (can’t hear)
    Everything from your perception slows down (30 seconds feels like 30 min)
    You lose your fine motor skills

    Then you have a stoppage.......

    You clear it (Run the gun) and then they hear their instructor in the back of their head say! ASSESS before you shoot...................

    In my opinion I don’t care who you are LE, MIL, CIVL. The ultimate goal in the gun fight is to prevail and not get shot. The only way to prevail is to SHOOT TO STOP THE THREAT.

    Tom
    ______________
    Perroni's Tactical Training Academy - Virginia Firearms Training
    Fredericksburg, Va.

  15. #14
    Member Array Randy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply Tom.

    Through proper training, drawing the handgun from its holster, the act of firing (aligning the handgun with the threat and pressing the trigger), clearing the stoppage, etc... should be largely a reflexive response, that is it requires none of your conscious thought to accomplish the physical tasks of "shooting" and operating the handgun.

    I think maybe the tap, rack, reacquire, reassess "steps" are being thought of in terms of a strictly serialized process. That is, you must tap before you rack, you must rack before you reacquire, and you must reacquire before you reassess.

    I realize that the serial model is the way people tend to think of things; it is normal since the mind is really only capable of performing one operation (or thought) at a time. It is also a common method people use to express their ideas. So, even though we are listing and discussing these actions as four distinct "steps", as in a strict serial process, they are really not executed in that manner.

    Given the fact that it is going to be very difficult, if not impossible, to take your visual and mental focus from the perceived deadly threat, this information will most likely be continually available while you reflexively perform the tap and rack operations. By the point in time when you are done with the tap and rack, you will know whether or not another shot needs to be fired because you have been continually assessing the situation.

    The ultimate goal in the gun fight is to prevail and not get shot. The only way to prevail is to SHOOT TO STOP THE THREAT.
    Agreed... and the only way we have available to know if the threat still exists is through a constant mental evaluation or assessment of said threat. The assessment is: "did I hit?" and/or "do I need more hits?" If there's no assessment after the initial decision to fire, the training would be such that you simply fire until you are out of ammunition.

    I also appreciate your other comments regarding the psychological and physiological changes in the mind and body. I have an entire section of material devoted to, specifically, the effects of fear or hormonal induced stress. Very important things to know so you can recognize it for what it is at the onset.

    Randy

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