Is There Anything Wrong with the Weaver Stance?

This is a discussion on Is There Anything Wrong with the Weaver Stance? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I go to this position naturally/by default and I know some other guys use other stances. Is there anything wrong with Weaver stance?...

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Thread: Is There Anything Wrong with the Weaver Stance?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    Is There Anything Wrong with the Weaver Stance?

    I go to this position naturally/by default and I know some other guys use other stances. Is there anything wrong with Weaver stance?

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
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    Nope, not at all. If you read what Jeff Cooper and the original Southwest pistol league bunch came up with, you will find that much of the "modern technique" of combat pistolry started with what came to be known as the Weaver stance or some derivative thereof.

    Over the years, the Weaver has evolved (at least in competition circles like IPSC) into what they refer to as the "gamesman's stance" which is nothing more than a squared shoulder hybrid of the Weaver/Isocoles stance which many now call the modern isocoles, but the origin of the stance is definitely clear.

    We all owe Mr. Jack Weaver, Jeff Cooper and all of the original group of Combat Masters a great debt for showing us the way.
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    Member Array CCWINNC's Avatar
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    I feel that the stance you use is really based on the grip size of your hand and the size of the weapon. The best stance gives you a natural point of aim. So the best stance you can use is whichever acheives the natural point of aim. For some people it is weaver stance and some it is Isosceles. For me it agains depends on the grip size of the weapon and how it aligns with my forearm. As far as tactical the best stance is the one that allows you to be able to move quickly from the centerline of the attack. A moving target is much harder to hit.



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    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    I sure hope not. It's how I shoot.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

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    I prefer, have been taught, practiced and trained on a sort of modified weaver like edr9x23super was talking about.

    From the way it's been explained to me, with your feet spread and one foot pointing slightly away it prepares you better for movement and just plain old running if you need to.

    A good combative shooting stance is one that allows you a balance between stability and mobility. We got a pretty interesting lesson in the difference in one of our classes.

    The instructor demonstrated different stances for different sports. Some designed for mobility only or mobility in only one direction (think of a runner here) and some for stability only and then he demonstrated finding the balance between the three because in defensive shooting as opposed to just target shooting, it's important to be able to move, but to be able to move in ALL directions and stable while moving.

    The best stance for that is a sort of modified weaver/isosceles. The modified isosceles gives you the stability, the modified weaver gives you the mobility.

    It's worked fine for me.

  7. #6
    Member Array Sig sauer's Avatar
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    Now days it's seems that everyone is using the stands where they are turned against the target with their feet leveled (don't know the name of it).

    I don't like it. I'm used to weaver. I have used it while shooting assault rifles, machine guns and handguns. It a well trained position for me and comes naturally. I'm not about to change it because there are "newer" stands out there.

    I think that you will shoot best with the stands that feels most comfortable for you. Regardless if it's new, old or your own custom made stands.

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    Think you'll get into a "stance" when it's go time?

    Maybe, maybe not.

    Dash cams have shown that more often than not, "stance" goes out the window when you are about to take or are taking incoming.

    It's more like a dance than a stance. My suggestion, learn to dance, shoot and hit reliably while doing so. Relying on any "stance" to make hits is inviting trouble.

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    We are taught to shoot with our chest square to the target, because that is where our plates are, but when I don't have body armor I go right back to a weaver stance, I don't know of anything really wrong with it.
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    VIP Member Array Rob99VMI04's Avatar
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    It is still a widely excepted stance; however, I believe the reasoning for using it was based on static from the holster competition rather then fighting. Most of The people I see using weaver at the two indoor ranges I frequent (one I work at) (no offense) are the same people who do not incorporate any movement into their training regiment, therefore they never get out of the box on the range.
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    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzQkr View Post
    Think you'll get into a "stance" when it's go time?

    Maybe, maybe not.

    Dash cams have shown that more often than not, "stance" goes out the window when you are about to take or are taking incoming.

    It's more like a dance than a stance. My suggestion, learn to dance, shoot and hit reliably while doing so. Relying on any "stance" to make hits is inviting trouble.

    Brownie
    +1

    When the SHTF and a gunfight is on, you're going to be shooting from whatever stance makes sense given the environment. One foot on the curb, one off, stepping fast to get behind a car, ducking to shoot under an obstruction, etc.

    IMO, there's nothing wrong with any stance, except thinking it's the only way you should shoot.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

  12. #11
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    When the SHTF and a gunfight is on, you're going to be shooting from whatever stance makes sense given the environment

    Not only that, but it's very likely you'll be firing one handed as well. How many really spend 80% of their practice one handed?

    Not enough likely

    Brownie
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    I admit that I don't practice one handed shooting nearly enough.

    I do point shoot but, at the range I adpot a modified Weaver Stance
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  14. #13
    Senior Member Array ronwill's Avatar
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    I concur with what most are saying. The Weaver Stance is an outstanding practice and observation stance. You should practice using more than one position though. Try changing from Weaver to kneeling, to standing barricade, etc. In this way you're getting used to different positions and if the time comes you'll be better off.
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    Distinguished Member Array kazzaerexys's Avatar
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    Also keep this in mind---start in an isosceles stance, shoulders square to your target and arms straight out with elbows locked. Now turn your torso to one side or the other as if tracking for targets. As a right-hander, as you pivot left, first your left elbow will bend, right arm stays straight; now you are in a Chapman (modified Weaver) stance. Keep turning and both elbows will bend; now you are in a Weaver.

    So, whichever stance you use as your primary, there is always a use for the others in a dynamic fight. Weaver, with bent arms, is fairly good at absorbing bounce from movement, so it turns out to be a very good shoot-on-the-move stance.

    The only time Weaver is a bad idea is if the gun is too big for your hands or your arm strength isn't enough to manage recoil with bent elbows. This will mostly affect the smaller shooter with a bigger gun. If you have the strength for Weaver, there's nothing wrong with it at all.

    (Me, I tend towards isosceles, with my arms biased slightly towards my strong side.)
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  16. #15
    Senior Member Array TheGreatGonzo's Avatar
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    It's only wrong if it does not work for you. As has been pointed out, when the poop hits the propeller, your body will find the quickest natural point of balance that is physically possible. Might be one-hand; might be one leg; might be prone. Practice from as many positions as you can as often as you can. For purposes of "qualifications" or fun shooting, I tend to shoot from a modified weaver.
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