New rules for production class USPSA

New rules for production class USPSA

This is a discussion on New rules for production class USPSA within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; USPSA Board of Directors Statement of Direction for the Production Division Equipment Rules (Appendix D4) March 7, 2009 Overview: In 2000, the Production Division was ...

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Thread: New rules for production class USPSA

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    New rules for production class USPSA

    USPSA Board of Directors
    Statement of Direction for the Production Division Equipment Rules (Appendix D4)
    March 7, 2009
    Overview:
    In 2000, the Production Division was created to be a division for stock pistols with very limited modifications allowed. The first iteration of the rules attempted to lay out the boundaries of permitted modifications:
    �� External modifications or replacement of factory components specifically not allowed.
    �� Internal replacement of factory components not allowed.
    �� Internal modifications such as polishing or detailing of factory components are allowed.
    Since the 2000 rulebook the Production Division rules have evolved, but they have always strictly limited the type and extent of modifications allowed. Some members have incorrectly assumed that the rules meant something other than the plain-language statements in the equipment-rules appendix. For example, members have assumed that “no external modifications” can be interpreted as “any modification is allowed as long as it can’t be seen outside the gun” and have made sweeping internal modifications to their guns when, in fact, the plain language in the rules has always sought to constrain internal modifications. The assumptions have led to a class of modifications currently in use which are not in keeping with the original intent of the division.
    At this time the USPSA Board of Directors finds that four observations are necessary:
    1) Some members’ current beliefs regarding internal modifications are not consistent with the original “stock gun” intent of the division.
    2) There is no way to restore the “stock gun” boundaries without retroactively declaring current member guns and modifications invalid for the division; the Board is reluctant to invalidate member‐owned equipment.
    3) There is no viable way to enforce restrictions on internal modifications without implementing an inspection process, a minimum trigger pull, or both; the Board does not wish to impose either approach at this time.
    4) Manufacturer innovation in the Production Division is desirable; the Board does not wish to enact rules which constrain the evolution of the “stock gun”.
    Therefore, the USPSA Board has decided to support NROI in issuing an all‐up interpretation of the Production Division rules, seeking to clarify both the intent of the division and the current boundaries of allowed and prohibited modifications.
    PLEASE NOTE that the Production Division is different from other Divisions, in that its equipment rules are strictly constrained by the language of the rules. In Production Division, unless the rules (and, by extension, official NROI interpretations) specifically state, in plain language, without assumptions or interpolations, that a modification is allowed, THAT MODIFICATION IS PROHIBITED.
    When reading the Production Division equipment rules,
    �� DO NOT assume something is ALLOWED, unless the rules/interpretations plainly and explicitly state that it is.
    �� DO NOT look for loopholes to exploit – the intent of the Board is to “limit modifications” with “no loopholes”
    �� DO NOT combine disparate clauses and/or interpretations and decide that together they “mean” something different from what they individually state.
    �� It is the responsibility of the shooter to ensure that his/her equipment is compliant with the Division rules. If a question arises, the ONLY official source for interpretations is NROI. If in doubt, ASK NROI.
    �� Modifications which come to the attention of match officials during a match, and which cannot be supported by the strict language of the Division equipment rules during a match will result in a move to Open Division per 6.2.5.1
    Summary:
    The broad intent of the Production Division remains intact; to provide an equipment category where stock or nearly-stock guns can compete on a relatively level playing field. Due to unsupported member assumptions, a wide variety of internal and external modifications have been seen in competition. USPSA’s intent, with this ruling, is to re-level the playing field, respectful of both members existing investments in guns and current modifications, and the desire to have the Division remain viable for typical carry-suitable guns.
    Members should take two very clear messages away from this interpretation:
    • The Board DOES intend to defend the definition of a “Production gun” with specific rules and constraints. Those rules and constraints may not give every shooter the green light to make every modification they want. This is by design. We want to enable and encourage innovation from manufacturers, while intentionally keeping the Production division from becoming another “anything goes” division.
    • USPSA has a responsibility to serve the interests of its members. In return, members have a responsibility to respect the rules of the game, and the principles of good sportsmanship. The Board is gravely concerned that members have independently “interpreted” Production rules and made it necessary to issue this sweeping clarification. If you have a question about whether or not a modification is ALLOWED or PROHIBITED for use in Production division, the correct thing to do is make a request of NROI for an official answer, and then wait for publication for that answer to officially take effect. Without an official, published NROI ruling that specifically authorizes a modification, that modification should be considered PROHIBITED for competition in the Production division.
    Supported/endorsed unanimously by the USPSA Board of Directors, March 7, 2009.
    NROI Interpretation for the Production Division Equipment Rules (Appendix D4)
    March 7, 2009
    General interpretation(s):
    In accordance with the direction of the Board and their statement of intent with regard to Production Division equipment rules, NROI hereby issues the following ruling:
    �� External modifications continue to be strictly constrained to items specifically listed below.
    �� Some specific classes of internal modifications are now specifically allowed, but in general internal modifications remain constrained to items specifically listed.
    �� If a conflict appears to exist between these general statements and the listed details, below, the specifics listed in the notes and clarifications below shall be deemed definitive.
    �� The burden of responsibility is on the shooter to ensure that his/her equipment is compliant with these provisions. If a modification is disputed – either by a Match Official or a competitor, under 11.1.2 and 11.7 – the competitor may be required to provide evidence of a specific clause in the rules or published NROI rulings which specifically authorizes the modification.
    �� While the rules are currently silent on a Match Official’s authority to disassemble a competitor’s equipment, a competitor may – at any time – be required to prove that the equipment is compliant with the equipment rules, up to and including the disassembly of their equipment to verify compliance and proper function (e.g., the proper operation of factory safety mechanisms).
    �� A competitor who cannot demonstrate that his/her equipment is compliant with these provisions will be moved to Open Division, under 6.2.5.1
    Except as specifically modified below, all other clauses in Appendix D4 remain in effect, along with any applicable NROI rulings. In order to carry binding authority in competition, an NROI ruling must be published in Front Sight and/or on the USPSA web-page.
    NROI Interpretation for the Production Division Equipment Rules (Appendix D4)
    [date_tbd], 2009
    Specific clauses and related interpretation(s):
    Appendix Item
    Current Language
    January-09 Interpretation/clarification
    21
    Authorized Modifications (strictly limited to these items and their stated guidelines)
    Please note that, during a match, a shooter may be required to demonstrate that their gun is in compliance with Division rules by identifying a specific rules clause or interpretation which authorizes any disputed modification. If the shooter cannot identify an authorizing rules-clause or interpretation, the RM shall rule that the modification is PROHIBITED for Production use and shall move the shooter to Open Division.
    21.1
    Internal throating and polishing to improve accuracy, reliability and function.
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: Because internal modifications are currently very difficult to enforce, NROI now deems that this clause means “INTERNAL modifications which do NOT conflict with other clauses of this appendix are NOW ALLOWED.
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� See 21.3 for specifics with regard to slides.
    �� See 21.4 for specifics with regard to barrels.
    �� ALL factory safety mechanisms, whether internal or external, must remain functional.
    �� See 22.2 for specifics on external safeties.
    �� Per existing NROI ruling, any “internal” modifications which result in a visible change to the external appearance of the gun when it is in battery REMAIN PROHIBITED unless specifically allowed by the plain language herein.
    21.3a
    Slide - refinishing
    Per existing NROI ruling, cosmetically enhancing the finish of a slide is already ALLOWED in Production Division, provided that the finish provides no competitive advantage.
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: This clause is NOW interpreted to specifically ALLOW refinishing the frame, as well as the slide, subject to the existing constraints on refinishing (cosmetic only, no competitive advantage).
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� Any finish which provides a non-cosmetic function will be deemed PROHIBITED. For example, a gun finish which provides a roughened texture in an area where grip tape is not allowed (Appendix E4) is a PROHIBITED modification.
    21.3b
    Milling of slide – only as required to insert sights.
    Remains in effect – a slide may be modified specifically for the purpose of installing sights, and for no other purpose.
    21.4
    21.4 (cont)
    After-market slides and barrels – provided they are the same length, contour and caliber as original factory standard.
    SLIDES: Current rules remain in effect – You may replace the slide with an OEM or aftermarket slide which is of the same length, contour and caliber as the original slide for that model of gun.
    BARRELS: Current rules remain in effect - you may replace the barrel with an OEM or aftermarket barrel which is of the same length, contour and caliber as the original barrel for that model of gun.
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� For purposes of this interpretation, a barrel within +/- 0.1” of OEM is “the same length”.
    21.5
    Grips
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: Revolver grips may be replaced with OEM or aftermarket grips of any shape,
    profile and surface texture.
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    n See 22.4, below, for specifics with regard to modifications on revolver grips.
    21.6
    Exchange of minor components (springs, safeties, slide stops, guide rods)
    3/09 INTERPRETATION - INTERNAL parts: This clause is NOW interpreted to mean that a broad range of INTERNAL parts may be modified or replaced – either with OEM or aftermarket parts.
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� Springs, strikers, sears, connector/disconnectors, and any other part which is NOT visible when the gun is in battery is considered an INTERNAL part and may be modified or replaced unless otherwise prohibited in these provisions (see section 22 for specific prohibitions).
    �� Guide rods are considered an “internal part” and may be modified and/or replaced with OEM or aftermarket guide rods even though part of the guide rod is externally visible when the gun is in battery. Note that the weight limits in D4-18 remain in force and relevant.
    3/09 INTERPRETATION - EXTERNAL parts: components which are externally visible may ONLY be replaced with OEM parts which are offered on the specific model of gun, another approved gun from the same manufacturer except as specifically clarified below
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� Barrels are considered an “external part” and are subject to specific restrictions in 21.4 and associated rulings.
    �� Aftermarket parts which extend the length of the magazine releases may be used. Magazine releases which provide a larger surface area (paddles, buttons) may only be used if an OEM part available on an approved model of gun.
    �� Parts from “custom shop” guns will only be considered “OEM parts” if the custom-shop gun is on the NROI list of approved Production guns.
    22
    22 (cont’d)
    Specifically prohibited modifications and features
    Please note that the absence of an item in the list of prohibited modifications MAY NOT be construed to mean a modification is allowed. A modification is only allowed in Production Division if there is a rules clause or interpretation which specifically declares that it is allowed
    in the Division. 3/09 INTERPRETATION: Removing or disabling firing-pin blocks or any other factory safety mechanism in Production division is specifically prohibited.
    22.2
    Disabling of any external safety or externally operated safety
    Remains in effect – external- and externally-operated safety mechanisms must remain operable. (no change)
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� For purposes of this clause, a “trigger safety” is externally visible, and must remain operable.
    �� For purposes of this clause, the prohibition on “disabling” means that you may NOT modify an external safety mechanism in any way that affects its function as a safety per the OEM design.
    �� For purposes of this clause, a magazine-disconnect is not considered a safety mechanism, and may be removed.
    Please note that other clauses in the body of the competition rules require that a “trigger mechanism must, at all times, function safely” (5.1.4), that handguns must be “serviceable and safe” (5.1.6) and that the Range Master is the final authority on the definition of “safety” as it pertains to the mechanism of the gun (8.1.2.4). 3/09 INTERPRETATION: We deem this to mean that a gun on which safety mechanisms have been removed or disabled will be considered “unserviceable or unsafe”, per 5.1.6
    It is the competitor’s responsibility to be able to demonstrate at any time that all factory safety mechanisms are functional, regardless of whether they are internal or external.
    22.4
    Grips – any addition or removal of material which changes the factory profile or adds function such as beavertail or thumbrest.
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: As noted above (21.5) Revolver grips may be replaced with OEM or aftermarket grips of any shape, profile and surface texture. 22.4 is deemed to NOT APPLY to REVOLVER grips. Adding or removing material to change the profile of Revolver grips is ALLOWED.
    22.5
    External plugs (such as Seattle Slug)
    Remains in effect – external plugs which alter the grip profile or extend past the bottom of the grip are PROHIBITED. Plugs which add significant weight to the gun are PROHIBITED.
    Special Notes/Clarifications:
    �� Per existing NROI ruling, a plastic plug which fits flush (+/- 0.1”) with heel of the grip IS allowed.
    �� For purposes of this interpretation, a plug weighing
    more than 0.5 ounce is considered “adding significant weight”.
    22.6
    Magwell opening
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: The longitudinal (front-to-back) dimension of the opening may be more than 1/4” greater than the corresponding dimension of a magazine. Restrictions on external flaring remain in effect.
    Special Cond #2
    Unless specifically authorized above, modifications are prohibited.
    3/09 INTERPRETATION: UNLESS a modification is SPECIFICALLY authorized in the rules or SPECIFICALLY authorized in an official, published NROI interpretation, it is considered a PROHIBITED MODIFICATION.
    Frequently Asked Questions for the Production Division Equipment Rules (Appendix D4)
    March 7, 2009
    1) Is there a minimum trigger-pull weight in USPSA Production Division?
    ANSWER: Not at this time.
    2) In the new interpretation, I can modify or replace internal parts. May I remove parts or add new ones?
    ANSWER: In general, YES. For example, you may drill a hole and add a screw inside the gun to provide an overtravel stop. However, removal or addition of parts is PROHIBITED if such removal or addition conflicts with a clause in Appendix D4 or a published NROI interpretation. For example, adding a part which can be seen from outside the gun when it is in battery would make your gun illegal for use in USPSA Production Division. Similarly, removing part of a safety mechanism would make your gun illegal for use in USPSA Production Division.
    3) My Production Division gun came from the factory with a firing pin block or a trigger safety. It affects the trigger pull and I would like to disable or remove them to get a smoother or lighter trigger. Is that allowed? You probably won’t be able to tell that I have done it without disassembling my gun anyway.
    ANSWER: NO. Per Appendix D4 item 22, disabling any external safety mechanism is specifically prohibited. In addition, USPSA has taken the position that ALL factory safety mechanisms must remain operable and functional on USPSA Production Division guns. As a result, disabling ANY safety mechanism on a USPSA Production Division gun is PROHIBITED. Per section 22.2 of the 2009 interpretation, a magazine-disconnect is not considered a “safety mechanism” and may be removed. Note that it is the competitor’s responsibility to ensure that his/her equipment is in compliance with the rules. A competitor may, at any time, be required to demonstrate that all factory safety mechanisms are operable and functional on their USPSA Production Division gun.
    4) My production gun is .40-caliber. In these tough economic times, we all know that 9mm is cheaper to shoot. May I put a 9mm slide and/or barrel into my Production Division gun? The manufacturer makes a similar model in 9mm and the RO probably wouldn’t be able to detect the difference without taking it apart.
    ANSWER: NO. Per Appendix D4 item 21, slides and/or barrels may only be replaced if they are of the same length, contour and caliber as the original factory standard for your gun. Changing your gun to 9mm would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for use in USPSA Production Division. Note that it is the competitor’s responsibility to ensure that his/her equipment is in compliance with the rules whether a Match Official can “detect the difference” or not. We trust that our members will compete according to principles of good sportsmanship.
    5) I have a Glock-17, and I know that the Glock-34 is an approved gun in the same caliber. May I put a Glock-34 barrel into my Glock-17?
    ANSWER: NO. Glock has never offered a Glock-17 with that barrel length. Using a Glock-34 barrel would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for USPSA Production Division.
    6) I have a Glock-20 (10mm). May I switch to a .40S&W barrel? Both barrels are the same “caliber”, and .40 ammo and brass are so much less expensive.
    ANSWER: NO. NROI has deemed that “caliber” means “caliber and chambering”. Glock has never offered a Glock-20 chambered for .40S&W, so changing to that barrel would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for USPSA Production Division.
    7) I want to use an aftermarket barrel of the same caliber, length and profile. But the barrel is a tiny bit longer. Is it okay to use?
    ANSWER: It depends. NROI has deemed that an aftermarket barrel within +/- 0.1” of the original length will be considered “the same length”. A replacement barrel which is more than 0.1” longer or shorter than the factory standard for that model of gun would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for USPSA Production Division.
    8) I want to use an aftermarket barrel of the same caliber, length and profile. But the barrel crown is slightly different. Is it okay to use?
    ANSWER: It depends. Barrels may be crowned in a variety of different styles (recessed, radiused, 11-degree, etc). A different style of crown does not, in itself, mean that the barrel has a different “contour”. However, if the crown on the replacement barrel has a substantially different configuration or function, it may be considered an “external modification” which would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for USPSA Production Division. Contact NROI for an official ruling before switching to the new barrel. Please note that the same guidance applies to re-crowning a barrel for the purposes of repairing damage or improving accuracy. A different style of crown is generally allowed, but re-crowning which results in substantially different configuration or function would be a prohibited modification.
    9) I have a Glock-17, and I know that the rules allow me to replace my slide with an aftermarket slide. The slide I want to use has front cocking serrations and a lowered ejection port. Can I use that slide on my Glock-17?
    ANSWER: NO. Glock has never offered a Glock-17 in that configuration, and milling a Glock-17 slide to produce those features would be a prohibited modification. As a result, using that slide would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for USPSA Production Division.
    10) In the new interpretation, many internal modifications are now allowed. May I modify the inside of my slide?
    ANSWER: NO. Per Appendix D4 item 21, a slide may be milled for the purpose of installing sights. A slide may not be modified – internally or externally - for any other purpose. Please note that surface polishing to improve reliability and function is allowed, but removing material or changing the shape of any surface would be considered a “modification”.
    11) I see that USPSA has decided to allow me to refinish the frame of my gun. Can I paint it with “crinkle paint” or some other finish which provides some texture?
    ANSWER: NO. Frames and slides may be refinished for cosmetic purposes only, and the finish cannot result in a competitive advantage. Any finish which is deemed to provide a competitive advantage – for example, a roughened texture in an area where grip tape is not allowed – would make your gun a “new/unapproved model” which would not be legal for use in USPSA Production Division.
    12) I want to hard-chrome my gun, but hard-chrome provides “non-cosmetic functions” (such as lubricity, rust prevention, etc). Is hard-chroming allowed?
    ANSWER: YES, as long as the new finish provides no competitive advantage (such as roughened texture where stippling or grip tape would not be allowed, per Appendix E4).
    13) I once had a scope mounted on my gun, and there are holes in the frame. Is that an illegal modification?
    ANSWER: It depends. If there are simply a series of small screw-holes drilled and tapped into the frame, and the gun is still within 2 ounces of standard weight, the holes would not be considered a prohibited modification. However, if it appears that the holes serve a separate purpose (such as lightening), they may be challenged by a range official or competitor. We would advise you to contact NROI for an official ruling.
    14) I see that the new interpretation allows me to change the shape of the grips on my revolver. Are there limits?
    ANSWER: Not at this time. NROI and the USPSA Board of Directors will be monitoring the Production Division closely, and if it appears that the freedom to change and/or modify revolver grip profiles is being abused for competitive advantage, restrictions may be imposed at a later date.
    15) Are revolvers required to “fit the box” for use in USPSA Production Division?
    ANSWER: NO. Per Appendix D4 item 7, revolvers are exempt from maximum size limits.
    16) I am looking at buying a “custom shop” gun which is based on a model that is approved for USPSA Production Division, but has different features than the normal off-the-shelf model. Is it legal to use in competition?
    ANSWER: It depends. In general, the custom shop can do any modifications which are also permitted for you to do. So, the custom shop can add texture in the permitted areas, can do internal work on trigger mechanisms, can fit an aftermarket barrel of the same length/caliber/contour, can install aftermarket sights, etc. However, for use in the USPSA Production Division, modifications are constrained no matter who performs
    them. So, if a modification would make a gun illegal for use in Production Division, that modification is illegal even if it came from the manufacturer’s custom shop. For example, the custom shop may not add or remove material to change the profile of the grip-frame, add or reshape a beavertail, remove or disable safety mechanisms, add an external magwell, mill the slide to achieve a different contour, etc. Modifications which are not specifically allowed in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling would result in a “new/unapproved model”, illegal for use in USPSA Production Division, no matter whether those modifications are made by you, your gun-smith or the manufacturer’s custom-shop. Please note that there is a process by which a manufacturer can freely innovate features on guns intended for USPSA Production Division. When they have produced at least 2000 units in a new configuration, they may submit the new model to NROI for approval in USPSA Production Division. When the gun has been certified as compliant with the Production Division rules, the new “custom shop” model will be added to the list of “approved guns”.
    17) I have an approved Production Division gun, and the manufacturer now offers a cool mag-release button on their “custom shop” versions of that gun. Can I use that mag-release button, since it is “an OEM part”?
    ANSWER: It depends. An external part which extends only the length of the magazine-release button is specifically allowed in section 21.6 of the 2009 interpretation, whether the part is OEM or aftermarket. If the part provides a larger surface area (a big head, a button, a paddle, etc) or is different than the original part in any dimension other than length, the part is only permitted if it is an OEM part available on an approved model of gun. Note that an internal modification to a magazine-release mechanism which results in shifting the magazine-release laterally (i.e., making the part stick out further on one side of the gun) would be considered an “internal modification”, and is allowed. Also note that parts from “custom shop” guns are only considered “OEM parts” if the “custom shop” model is on the NROI list of approved guns. If NROI has not certified the “custom shop” gun for USPSA Production Division, using a custom-shop part may be an “external modification”, resulting in a “new/unapproved model” which would be illegal for USPSA Production Division. Contact NROI for an official ruling before switching to the new part.
    18) What provisions of this interpretation apply to magazines? May I modify my magazines?
    ANSWER: In general, NO. All existing rules and rulings remain in effect for magazines. While there are no specified limits on magazine length, an existing ruling requires that the gun must fit in the box with a magazine inserted, and that all magazines (whether OEM or aftermarket) must be “dimensionally the same as the original magazine for that model of gun”. Adding aftermarket base pads, adding or removing material from base pads or adding grip-tape would all be considered external modifications and are not allowed. Springs and followers, for purposes of this ruling, would be considered “internal parts” and may be modified or replaced without restrictions.
    19) What provisions of this interpretation apply to stippling or checkering? May I stipple or checker my mag-release button or thumb-safety lever?
    ANSWER: NO. Stippling and checkering are only allowed in the areas of the frame specified in Appendix E4. In addition, Appendix E4 specifically prohibits applying grip-tape to slide, trigger, trigger-guard, or any lever or button. For purposes of this interpretation, stippling or checkering any of those items would be a considered prohibited modification.
    20) The USPSA Production Division rules have serious restrictions on external modifications. Does that mean I can do anything I want “inside the gun”, as long as it cannot be seen when the gun is in battery?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    21) I want to make a modification to my USPSA Production Division gun, and there is not a specific clause which applies but there are others which seem to imply it is okay. Am I covered?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    22) I’m pretty sure I found a “loophole”, and a modification I’d like to make and it is NOT on the list of “prohibited modifications”? As long as there is nothing that specifically says I can’t do it, am I covered?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    23) I emailed the USPSA office with a question about a modification, and they said it was okay? Am I covered?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    24) I posted a question about a modification on the forums, and the consensus is that it is okay. Am I covered?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    25) I emailed the Director of NROI with a question about a modification, and got back an email that says it is okay. Am I covered?
    ANSWER: NO. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    26) There are a bunch of modifications which we all know have always been allowed, but I can’t find them in the new interpretation. Are they “grandfathered”?
    ANSWER: NO. Chances are they were never really allowed. Production Division is the one equipment division which does NOT support “interpretation of the rules”. The intent of the USPSA Board is – and always has been – to strictly limit the types of modifications that can be done in USPSA Production Division. If you have to “connect dots” or “make assumptions” or “infer” or combine different clauses to arrive at a conclusion that something is legal… it isn’t. ALL modifications are PROHIBITED in USPSA Production Division unless
    a specific item in Appendix D4 or a published NROI ruling clearly states that specific modification is allowed for use in USPSA Production Division.
    27) So, how do I find out if a modification is “officially” allowed in USPSA Production Division?
    ANSWER: If a modification is specifically allowed, in plain English, in Appendix D4 or a published NROI interpretation, you’re good to go. If you cannot find a clause in either place which specifically authorizes the modification in question, email the Director of NROI and ask for an official ruling. When his ruling is published in Front Sight and/or on the USPSA web page, it will be “official.”
    28) There’s no way I’m letting anyone take apart my gun, especially during a match. How are you going to tell whether or not my gun is legal?
    ANSWER: The rules require you to be able to demonstrate that your gun is in compliance with the rules, including requiring you to be able to prove that all factory safety mechanisms are functional. You may have to take your gun apart to demonstrate those things. If you cannot – or will not - demonstrate that your gun is in full compliance with USPSA Production Division equipment rules, you will be moved to Open division in accordance with rule 6.2.5.1
    29) The factory produces several versions of my Production gun – one with a firing-pin block or external thumb safety, and one without. Mine came without, but has holes in the frame or slide where it would have been. How can I “demonstrate” that I have not illegally removed those safety mechanisms?
    ANSWER: Range staff cannot possibly know every factory configuration of every gun, and won’t know every detail of your particular gun. So if there is some aspect of your gun which would cause it to be challenged under these rules, we believe your best course of action is to be prepared to provide documentation about the original factory configuration of your gun. A letter from the manufacturer, a catalog page or other evidence which lists (for example) a range of serial numbers which were shipped without those safety mechanisms should be more than sufficient.
    30) I made modifications because people told me they were OK, and I can’t un-do them. What am I supposed to do with this gun?
    ANSWER: Limited and Limited-10 are divisions which allow more types of modifications than Production. USPSA Production Division has always strictly constrained the types of modifications allowed.
    31) Why was this new interpretation created?
    ANSWER: Competitors were making flawed assumptions about what the rules “mean”, and the USPSA Board felt it was important to provide as much detail and clarity to the matter as possible.
    32) Is this the final and definitive set of interpretations for USPSA Production Division?
    ANSWER: No. NROI will continue to issue official interpretations as questions arise. In addition, the USPSA Board is committed to preserving the Production Division as a division for competing with “stock” or “nearly stock” guns, suitable for carry purposes. As a result, NROI and the USPSA Board of Directors will be monitoring the Production Division closely and if it appears that portions of these rulings are being abused or misinterpreted, or if the new rulings prove insufficient to preserve the desired attributes of the Division, further restrictions may be imposed at a later date.
    33) Do NROI’s answers to these FAQs have the authority of an official NROI rules interpretation?
    ANSWER: YES. The answers to these FAQs are considered part of the 3/09 NROI rules interpretation and, when published in Front Sight and/or on the USPSA website shall be deemed authoritative for USPSA Production Division competition.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    Thanks Ram! I hadn't reviewed the changes prior to your post, and I appreciate it. (I'll be ROing in the next match!)

    Dan
    "What does Marcellus Wallace LOOK like?"

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