Interesting idea from another gun "discipline"

This is a discussion on Interesting idea from another gun "discipline" within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I was reading tonight about target shooting with the .308, and came across an article ( Bugholes from Bipod ) that was somewhat interesting, but ...

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Thread: Interesting idea from another gun "discipline"

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    Senior Member Array BlackPR's Avatar
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    Interesting idea from another gun "discipline"

    I was reading tonight about target shooting with the .308, and came across an article (Bugholes from Bipod) that was somewhat interesting, but there was one part that caught my eye from a fellow who does a LOT of shooting. Now remember, he's talking long distance shooting from a bipod, but I have to wonder if the same technique couldn't be utilized for practicing draws from concealment. Here's the relevant quote:

    I practice in the dark by dry firing repeatedly. Most of my feel training is done in a dark room, no distractions, my sensitivity and muscle memory are greatly enhanced.
    So... what do you all think? Practicing draws in a quiet, dark room? Obviously a big part of drawing is target acquisition, but for the act of drawing, the grip and stance, perhaps this isn't such a bad idea. Especially if, as he says, it improves sensitivity and muscle memory.
    The facts are indisputable. There is more data supporting the benefits of Conceal Carry than there is supporting global warming. If you choose ignorance, in light of all the evidence, in order to bolster your irrational fear of guns, you are a greater threat to society than any gun owner.

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    Member Array bigiceman's Avatar
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    This is an interesting idea. While most of the discipline of drawing from concealment involves no visual aid, we do not look at our firearm as we draw, there may indeed be benefit from this type of practice. Drawing and dry operation of our firearm, clearing, loading, without visual aid, would be good practice in my opinion.
    But if you are authorized to carry a weapon, and you walk outside without it, just take a deep breath, and say this to yourself...
    "Baa."
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    Revolutionary War Veterans Association Shooter Qualification: Cook

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    Member Array adroitus's Avatar
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    I think practice in the dark would have its advantages, but the only thing I would worry about is sight alignment. If you can't see your sights, you may be ingraining improper sight alignment into your draw stroke.

    Of course, that's only if you don't have night sights on your defensive pistol. You do have night sights, right?

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    Distinguished Member Array SonofASniper's Avatar
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    The purpose is learning trigger control. Calm your body, control your breathing, let nothing in the world distract you, know when you squeeze the trigger when that trigger will break and release the firing pin.


    The same thing can be applied to pistol craft, or anything with a trigger for that matter.

    Now if you are worried about drawing and ingraining an incorrect sight alignment than do this.

    Quiet room that is secured from outside interference. Dim the lights or turn them off. Have a target somewhere, on the wall. For my preference, make it smaller. Take a lamp that can be directed and illuminate just the target. Start your practice. You can work it up to the point where you should be able to do it with your eyes closed, and when you open them your pistol will be pointing where you need it to.
    I will support gun control when you can guarantee all guns are removed from this planet. That includes military and law enforcement. When you can accomplish that, then I will be the last person to lay down my gun. Then I will carry the weapon that replaces the gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPR View Post
    I was reading tonight about target shooting with the .308, and came across an article (Bugholes from Bipod) that was somewhat interesting, but there was one part that caught my eye from a fellow who does a LOT of shooting. Now remember, he's talking long distance shooting from a bipod, but I have to wonder if the same technique couldn't be utilized for practicing draws from concealment. Here's the relevant quote:



    So... what do you all think? Practicing draws in a quiet, dark room? Obviously a big part of drawing is target acquisition, but for the act of drawing, the grip and stance, perhaps this isn't such a bad idea. Especially if, as he says, it improves sensitivity and muscle memory.
    Dry fire practice, and quick response from the holster is very important in my opinion. The only reason I have a laser on one of my defensive pistols is to shoot from the hip, so to speak.

    There is no time to sight and shoot as you do at a range if you encounter an intruder.

    The laser is not going to improve your accuracy at a range. If your sight picture is correct at the range, you should not see the laser beam at all.

    The laser works well in the dark and shoots where you point it. In extreme situations, you will not have time to properly aim with any sights. The laser though can easily stop an intruder in his tracks without firing once you have him painted with your beam.
    If you understand, things are just as they are... If you do not understand, things are just as they are....
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    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
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    After an instinctive shooting course, I completely agree. I took my night sights off, they were distracting. In the distance of a home defense shooting, point shooting is natural and accurate. You can try it yourself. Take your laser gun and pretend it's your right index finger. With the gun in a comfortable position, point at your target. Now engage the laser. With just a little practice, you'll be on everytime.

    If you want some great training in unsighted shooting, check out
    http://www.threatfocused.com/forums/index.php
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

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    Reducing distractions is always a recommended way to train in any phsysical disipline. When I dry fire at home I'll even go so far as to put in ear plugs to drown out background noises.

    Recently I've been training in .22 target shooting with a couple of guys I met at the range. you have to get pretty Zen for that. you have to block out as many distractions as possible. I have found that my defensive shooting technique has improved since I have begun learning this focused mindset.
    "Mind own business"
    "Always cut cards"

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