Pressure points for self defense

Pressure points for self defense

This is a discussion on Pressure points for self defense within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I don't rely on pain much less pressure points. It is not because they don't hurt me or work on other people. The reason is ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29

Thread: Pressure points for self defense

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,067

    Pressure points for self defense

    I don't rely on pain much less pressure points. It is not because they don't hurt me or work on other people. The reason is that during a confrontation especially SD you have a very limited time to be effective. The use of pressure points has four basic issues-
    All points do not work on everyone
    You need to monitor the person for their response
    They are easily over stimulated limiting their effectiveness
    Reliance on pressure points takes training, when you train in something you expect it to work. When it doesn't you become task fixated instead of continuing to fight. The same as someone putting rounds into the COM of an attacker and standing there in disbelief because the person is not bursting into flames.

    I do some things that may appear to be using pressure points. That is just because they are good spots on the body to manipulate balance. Any pressure points that are used should have a mechanical advantage. The best way to combat failure is with redundancy. Again, I don't claim to be the burning bush of martial knowledge. Just sharing what I have adopted as my training doctrine based on experience and research. - George


  2. #2
    Member Array budokaitd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Boone County, MO
    Posts
    103
    I don't rely on pain/pressure points either, but a good strike to a pressure point/nerve cluster is good for off balancing an adversary. That's about all I've ever used them for. I won't spend too much time looking for a "magical button" to push in the middle of a fight. Thanks for the post.
    Join the NRA and Gun Owners of America.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array Bunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina - LKN
    Posts
    1,384
    Agreed. Don't forget that for us women, we're usually smaller and have that disadvantage in a fight. We're (supposedly) easily overpowered. As a woman, I try and rely on the fact that my center of gravity is lower anyhow, and I use my smaller stature as an advantage, especially on the ground. By using basic principles of body mechanics that I was taught in Jiu-Jitsu, it makes the odds less in the BG's favor and more in mine.

    Though I have yet to get into any fight that wasn't in a controlled situation (ex: on the mat in the dojo). I'm not confident as to what would happen in a real SHTF situation.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array Dal1Celt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Clarksville, TN
    Posts
    2,672
    Eyes, throat, collar bones, groin, knees, and shins. These are the main points I focus on during a fight. I was studing Escrima, Kali, Silat, Philippino stick fighting (however you want to call it) My instructor moved away. Found another person, but price is too much for me right now.
    "Without fear there can be no Courage!"

  5. #5
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,895
    Escrima is a beautiful art, with powerful techniques, and wonderful empty handed applications of the stick techniques which are great for disarms and counters etc. My sense of it, having worked really hard on it for almost 2 years, is that it is technique sensitive. So unless you are very proficient it could easily fail in a real deal fight. OTOH, it certainly incorporates a lot of elements fromJiu-Jitsu and other arts and has its place in one's personal array of tools.

    I started learning when I was 61 or so, and unfortunately my old body couldn't take the stress. A younger person, especially with some natural athleticism, would make progress at a moderate pace and could fairly quickly become very formidable.

    I think my biggest issue besides personal limitations due to age, was that the techniques are so brutal it is hard to practice them realistically without harming your partner.

    I was very fortunate to have a great partner and highly skilled martial artist in my class; he is the officer I have referred to in other posts, and I'll be forever grateful for his kindness and patience. Learning along with a very experienced LEO who had black belts in other arts was one of the most enjoyable things I have ever done.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array Jmac00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    894
    I'm more comfortable with the "crazy white guy" method.......

    I just go nuts and start biting, kicking, scratching .........then run like hell.

    Distance is your friend
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    INFIDELS

  7. #7
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    16,146
    I never was taught to use pressure points during a fight, but more for control techniques. Once hands or feet start flailing , strikes or other methods work well enough.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Dal1Celt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Clarksville, TN
    Posts
    2,672
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    Escrima is a beautiful art, with powerful techniques, and wonderful empty handed applications of the stick techniques which are great for disarms and counters etc.

    I think my biggest issue besides personal limitations due to age, was that the techniques are so brutal it is hard to practice them realistically without harming your partner.
    I couldn't agree with you more.

    After several hits to the thumbs I learned rather quick to keep them tucked in properly.

    You can continue to train at a slower pace to keep your muscle memory going, sort of like Thai Chi.

    I miss the sessions that I was going to and hope that someday I'll be able find another instructor that I can afford.
    "Without fear there can be no Courage!"

  9. #9
    New Member Array Glawlker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Shawnee Kansas
    Posts
    4
    I was tought to use a ppct strike as a tool to attempt to stun and, run to get as much distance from you and the threat as possible. I would never rely on them as a primary defense tool, although some of the pressure points do hurt like heck. Its just not practical for most situations.

  10. #10
    Sponsor Array DCJS Instructor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    CONUS
    Posts
    431
    George,

    As always good stuff!

    Give me a call when you get back from Texas!

    Tom

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array dnowell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    587
    I see pressure points and other hand to hand stuff like that as a good way to deal with a non-lethal violent encounter - say a guy grabbing you in a bar. Not appropriate to draw down, but you have to deal with it.

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Over here now!
    Posts
    3,617
    I lean towards joint manipulation and pain compliance . On the job, it has worked remarkably well and kept my UOF liability and reporting way down.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

  13. #13
    VIP Member
    Array 64zebra's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    Posts
    6,460
    Quote Originally Posted by semperfi.45 View Post
    I lean towards joint manipulation and pain compliance . On the job, it has worked remarkably well
    yep, pressure points mainly for compliance

    pressure points different than proper strike zones.....I love a good brachial stun
    LEO/CHL
    Certified Glock Armorer

    "I got a touch of hangover bureaucrat, don't push me"
    --G.W. McClintock

    Independence is declared; it must be maintained. Sam Houston-3/2/1836
    If loose gun laws are good for criminals why do criminals support gun control?

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas, in the RGV
    Posts
    747
    I have the rare joy of being one of those people where pressure points work exactly as advertised. All of them. My friend, however, is one of those people you will never, ever get anything more than a mildly inconvenienced "Ow" out of.

    Kyusho is one of those skills where practice really makes perfect. My Kempo sensei with more than 30 years of experience can spend an entire 2-hour session whacking you in pressure point after pressure point at combat speeds while I flail around and manage to get one per 25 repetitions or so at such speeds. This points to the need for your core unarmed techniques to be based upon leverage, balance disruption, and effective energy transfer into your target rather than going for the super-fly, ninhitsu Point o' Screaming Death stuff until you've worked at it for...30 years or so.

    If you can get it right, it's gravy. If not, there is always hitting them in the face again.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array Jmac00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    I have the rare joy of being one of those people where pressure points work exactly as advertised. All of them. My friend, however, is one of those people you will never, ever get anything more than a mildly inconvenienced "Ow" out of.

    Kyusho is one of those skills where practice really makes perfect. My Kempo sensei with more than 30 years of experience can spend an entire 2-hour session whacking you in pressure point after pressure point at combat speeds while I flail around and manage to get one per 25 repetitions or so at such speeds. This points to the need for your core unarmed techniques to be based upon leverage, balance disruption, and effective energy transfer into your target rather than going for the super-fly, ninhitsu Point o' Screaming Death stuff until you've worked at it for...30 years or so.

    If you can get it right, it's gravy. If not, there is always hitting them in the face again.
    ya, but if you use your car, you can get ALL the pressure points, all at once
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    INFIDELS

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Pressure Washer?
    By ArmyCop in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: February 10th, 2011, 08:49 AM
  2. Home Defense Strategy points to ponder
    By mercop in forum Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: January 19th, 2010, 11:12 PM
  3. +P vs Standard Pressure
    By Rollo in forum Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: December 12th, 2009, 06:36 AM
  4. +P and pressure
    By rmeron in forum Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: June 10th, 2009, 11:22 PM
  5. Ridemcowboy - 8 points, MI Whitetail 0 points
    By RidemCowboy in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: December 6th, 2005, 03:35 PM

Search tags for this page

balance disruptin pressuren points.
,

balance disruption points

,
balance disruption points.
,

balance disruption pressure points

,
defensive pressure points
,
how to use pressure point restraining tool
,
ppct strike zones
,
pressure point defence tactics
,
pressure point disruption
,

pressure point restraining tool

,

tactical pressure points

,
tactical self defense pressure points
Click on a term to search for related topics.