Do we really need to practice??

This is a discussion on Do we really need to practice?? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I love to shoot, but do we really need to spend 1000s of rounds a year for the sake of practicing for a defensive situation ...

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Thread: Do we really need to practice??

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array wormy's Avatar
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    Do we really need to practice??

    I love to shoot, but do we really need to spend 1000s of rounds a year for the sake of practicing for a defensive situation thats not going to happen to the majority of us? Especially during the current ammo shortage. Dont get me wrong, I shoot enough to be totally familiar with my cc firearm. Statistics show that a distance of 6 feet or less in a stressfull situation the police miss their target 57% of the time.

    I guess my point is shouldnt we try to learn to be more mentally prepared and how to avoid the BG, than being able to put a clip dead center mass in a target each week at the range under less than stressfull conditions?

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array SonofASniper's Avatar
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    Yes and no.

    Shoot as often as you like, but don't make it a chore. Shooting should be an enjoyable hobby.
    I will support gun control when you can guarantee all guns are removed from this planet. That includes military and law enforcement. When you can accomplish that, then I will be the last person to lay down my gun. Then I will carry the weapon that replaces the gun.

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    I would like to do too much affirmatively than negatively. Practice is the only way to go. You definately must be prepared mentally.

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    VIP Member Array boricua's Avatar
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    As far as target shooting, I think that once you are proficient and happy with your grouping, all you need is enough rounds to sustain your skills. Now, I would definitely train frequently on cover, drawing and presentation for different scenarios. And, SA goes without saying.

    I try to shoot as often as possible because I like to shoot and practice makes perfect.
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    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Yes, you need to practice. To carry a gun without regular practice would be irresponsible.

    That said, you don't have to shoot a huge amount of ammo. You can do a heck of a lot without firing a round. If you have a regular dry practice regimen it's not hard to keep your skills up with only a little bit of live fire. Once you've gotten some good training and acquired a solid grasp of the basics, daily dry practice and a hundred or so rounds a month at the range are all it takes to keep those skills.

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    Practice make perfect, but an adrenaline flow can screw up everything...

    Stay armed...get training and practice...stay safe!
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    Handgun accuracy is a perishable skill that is lost or diminished when not used.

    Therefore, it is needed to stay proficient.

    I guess my point is shouldn't we try to learn to be more mentally prepared and how to avoid the BG, than being able to put a clip dead center mass in a target each week at the range under less than stressfull conditions?
    Thats a big part of it...being aware enough before hand so as not to engage.

    I've often heard it said, "the best fight is the one you weren't in..."
    The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it...- George Orwell

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    Member Array Sig4life's Avatar
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    I practice pretty much this every day, after a while it comes as second nature, perhaps this will help.

    Awareness, according to experts, makes up 90% of self-defense, the remaining 10% being physical techniques. With awareness, you can identify and avoid potentially dangerous situations. Without it, you become an easy target for a criminal.

    Colonel Jeff Cooper, a combat pistol instructor, developed the Color Code system, used by most military and police organizations, to differentiate different levels of awareness.

    These color codes help recognize, evaluate, and avoid potential threats. They are used to measure rising threat and make most situations avoidable. The following are the colors in ascending order of awareness of danger: white, yellow, orange, and red.

    Code White
    * You are secure.
    * Awareness is switched off.
    * You are unaware of your environment, its inhabitants, and their rituals of attack.
    * All attackers look for victims in this state.

    Code Yellow
    * You are cautious.
    * Awareness is switched on.
    * State of threat awareness and relaxed alertness.
    * You have a 360-degree peripheral awareness of such environmental danger spots as secluded doorways, entries, and alleys, as well as such psychological triggers as adrenal dump and attacker ruses. Be aware of people, vehicles, behind large objects, dark areas, etc.

    Code Orange
    * You are in danger.
    * State of threat evaluation.

    * Specific alert. A possible target has been identified. A particular situation that has drawn your attention and could present a major problem. Someone may be giving oral indicators such as direct threats or using suspicious language. Focus on the potential attacker.

    * Check to see if there is an avenue of escape, potential weapons available, and if others around you are friend or foe.

    * Decision is made to take action.

    Code Red
    * You are in conflict.
    * State of threat avoidance.
    * Fight or flight. Flee, defend, or attack. You have evaluated the situation, and if there is a threat, you prepare to fight or run.
    * Never stand or fight if there is a possibility of fleeing.
    * Carry out decision to act made in Code Orange.
    * If use of physical self-defense techniques is necessary, use the level of force appropriate to the threat. E.g., don't treat someone who pushes you because he is rude like someone who is trying to stab you with a knife.

    How to Use the Color Codes of Awareness

    The color codes of awareness are a continuum of your awareness and readiness to defend. The objective is to constantly flow from one color to the next above or below, depending on the situation.

    Never be in white. Spend most your time in yellow, even in places where you feel safe, such as at home.

    Constantly be aware and alert, and shift from yellow and orange often as you notice potential threats and dangers. When in orange, notice what you can do to flee, defend, or attack if it become necessary, and make the decision to take a specific action if the situation escalates to red.

    When in orange, notice what you can do to flee, defend, or attack if it becomes necessary, and make the decision to take a specific action if the situation escalates to red.

    The Color Codes in Practice

    Here's an example of how the Color Codes of awareness could be used. A 100-pound woman is walking to her car, carrying grocery bags. Being aware and alert in Code Yellow, she sees two suspicious men near her car.

    She switches from Yellow to Orange. She decides on her self-defense options. They walk toward her and reach for her. She switches to Red, and executes her decisions: she throws the bags at them and runs back into the store.

    Conclusion

    Starting right now, be in Code Yellow. Throughout your day, identify potential areas of danger and switch to Code Orange as necessary. Switch back to Code Yellow if no threat exists. Do this exercise again tomorrow. And the next day. And so on. Eventually, awareness becomes a habit. Make the most important self-defense skill, awareness, a habit.

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
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    Excellent advice so far. Also worth consideration if you don't already do it: Dry fire.

    Rough guesstimate - I dry fire 5x as much as live fire. It has made a tremendous improvement in my live fire marksmanship and manipulation skills.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

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    Member Array ToddG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormy View Post
    I love to shoot, but do we really need to spend 1000s of rounds a year for the sake of practicing for a defensive situation thats not going to happen to the majority of us?
    By that logic, why spend money on a gun in the first place?

    Dont get me wrong, I shoot enough to be totally familiar with my cc firearm.
    Can you define "totally familiar," here?

    Statistics show that a distance of 6 feet or less in a stressfull situation the police miss their target 57% of the time.
    There are so many different statistics about LE hit ratios that it's dangerous to start quoting them.

    Furthermore, even if the above statistic is true, it raises two important considerations:
    1. Most police officers have significantly more training than the typical CCW citizen. If a cop misses that much with his level of training and regular requalifications, how well will the average Joe do?
    2. If the average police officer does that poorly given his level of training, wouldn't you want to have more training than that in hopes you'll do better?


    I guess my point is shouldnt we try to learn to be more mentally prepared and how to avoid the BG, than being able to put a clip dead center mass in a target each week at the range under less than stressfull conditions?
    Why are the two exclusive? You can form and foster a warrior mindset without taking time or money away from shooting practice. You can work on your situational awareness skills without wearing out your gun. In fact, there are shooting/range activities you can engage in which actually improve both your mindset and your awareness.

    The simple reality is that under stress, you will not suddenly become a warrior god. You will, at best, default to that level of performance you can achieve without conscious thought. If you've built up the skills to do things like draw, reload, and hit a target rapidly & accurately without having to think through the steps, you have a much better chance of doing those things under stress.

    The average man prepares for the expected. The exceptional man prepares for the possible.
    Train Hard, Stay Safe!
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  12. #11
    Member Array Armorkingg's Avatar
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    Yes and no, but it always helps to be prepared. A little practice live and dry helps keep you sharp.

    Nice post Sig.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array Pikachu711's Avatar
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    I think that it is important that we all as CCW permitees fire live ammunition on a regular basis. How often depends upon you own situation with regards to locating practice ammo and the cost of range time. That has to be a personal decision on your part.

    I prefer to go to a local indoor range rather than drive out to the desert areas outside of the immediate area. Plus, it's starting to get somewhat "warm" lately as well. The A/C cooled ranges are a great alternative.

    Developing the "muscle memory" to fire a handgun to the point we feel confident we will hit our intended target is important. Don't get me wrong. Dry fire training does have it's place. But live fire can't be duplicated.

    Just a few thoughts from a former armed security officer. I now work "unarmed" but I would prefer to work armed if at all possible.
    "Gun control is being able to hit your target."
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  14. #13
    Senior Member Array wormy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddG View Post
    By that logic, why spend money on a gun in the first place?



    Can you define "totally familiar," here?



    There are so many different statistics about LE hit ratios that it's dangerous to start quoting them.

    Furthermore, even if the above statistic is true, it raises two important considerations:
    1. Most police officers have significantly more training than the typical CCW citizen. If a cop misses that much with his level of training and regular requalifications, how well will the average Joe do?
    2. If the average police officer does that poorly given his level of training, wouldn't you want to have more training than that in hopes you'll do better?




    Why are the two exclusive? You can form and foster a warrior mindset without taking time or money away from shooting practice. You can work on your situational awareness skills without wearing out your gun. In fact, there are shooting/range activities you can engage in which actually improve both your mindset and your awareness.

    The simple reality is that under stress, you will not suddenly become a warrior god. You will, at best, default to that level of performance you can achieve without conscious thought. If you've built up the skills to do things like draw, reload, and hit a target rapidly & accurately without having to think through the steps, you have a much better chance of doing those things under stress.

    The average man prepares for the expected. The exceptional man prepares for the possible.

    Im not saying we dont need to practice cover, drawing, and re-loading and shooting. Im simply suggesting those of us who are blue collar 8-5 family people may not have the time and money to take tactical training courses and buy 1000s of rounds of ammo, especially when you say shouldnt we train more than the police.

    I think the post by SIG is excellent information for the normal law abiding citizen who is generally not in dangerous areas of town late at night. Thanks for the posts.

  15. #14
    Member Array ToddG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormy View Post
    Im not saying we dont need to practice cover, drawing, and re-loading and shooting. Im simply suggesting those of us who are blue collar 8-5 family people may not have the time and money to take tactical training courses and buy 1000s of rounds of ammo, especially when you say shouldnt we train more than the police.
    It's a matter of priorities. Each of us has a different comfort level. But as you pointed out yourself, little or no practice and little or no training is not going to prepare you for a fight.

    Awareness & avoidance are certainly important and useful skills to develop. But if you assume you can avoid all trouble, that's not being very aware.

    If you really believe you can use "awareness & avoidance" to maintain 100% safety, then why carry a gun in the first place? Once you've accepted that you may need a gun, then it logically follows that if you need a gun you're in a very, very bad situation that you couldn't avoid.

    It never ceases to amaze me how many people will go out and buy new guns every month or two but then bemoan the fact that practice and training cost too much. As I said, it's a matter of priority. Some people are collectors who carry a gun as a security blanket, and some people are actually dedicated to becoming proficient.
    Train Hard, Stay Safe!
    Todd Louis Green
    pistol-training.com

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array Bunny's Avatar
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    Yes. I agree, practice makes perfect. Better to have the tools, the training, and the mental fortitude and NOT need it, than to need it and not have it. I am a Scout Mom, we live to Be Prepared.

    But then, I'd use any excuse to get out to the range. Currently, I'm explaining to my husband that the Zombie Apocalypse is nigh. I wonder how long he's gonna buy it?

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