what drills do you run?

what drills do you run?

This is a discussion on what drills do you run? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I was just wanting to make a list of drills I can run next time I go to the range. What are your favorite drills ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Array bigo5552000's Avatar
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    Question what drills do you run?

    I was just wanting to make a list of drills I can run next time I go to the range. What are your favorite drills and description please? One that I use regularly is the 5555 drill which is 5 shots in 5 seconds from 5 yards within 5 inches.
    thanks for the info guys!!
    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."-Einstein


  2. #2
    Member Array JCAz's Avatar
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    I run a drill at home pretty consistently.

    Whenever I know my daughter has a guy coming over to the house, I make sure I am cleaning one of the guns.

    Seriously.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array bigo5552000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCAz View Post
    I run a drill at home pretty consistently.

    Whenever I know my daughter has a guy coming over to the house, I make sure I am cleaning one of the guns.

    Seriously.
    hahaha! When I was in high school my friend went to pick up his prom date and when he got there her dad was cleaning his double barrel. He walked in the kitchen and her dad snapped the shotgun shut and he nearly pooed himself!!
    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."-Einstein

  4. #4
    Senior Member Array bigo5552000's Avatar
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    wow no one runs any drills??
    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."-Einstein

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    Here's a couple of drills I like to run when I've got the outdoor range to myself.....

    Close-in drill: Have your target at the three to five yard marker and practice drawing/unholstering and engageing. Two shots. Go slowly, this is ment to create 'muscle/movement' memory and 'point shooting'/combat accuracy.

    Reload drill: (works best if you have someone else to 'load' for you) Load a squib/plastic practice round in your mag (you shouldn't know where) and, while firing, your forced to "tap, rack, reassess". This is a drill to gain compentency when a FTF happens in combat. Target should not be farther than 10 yards.
    Also practice reloading your spare mag while engageing your target as well.

    Whenever at the range, put a couple of mags worth of rounds through your EDC weak-hand only....one to two shots at 3-5 yards.

    Whenever practicing any drill (new or otherwise) go SLOWLY.......
    Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast.........and don't get caught up with the accuracy at distance. Nearly ALL gunfights happen between five to 20 feet. (Think roughly a car length) You HAVE to hit what you aim at WRT real-world distances. Always shoot some at the 10, 15, and 20 yard ranges, just don't focus on that.......hitting center-mass at 5, 7, and 10 yards is desired.

    Hint: don't get 'fancy' or 'flashy'.......BASICS. No "Hollywood"stuff, this is simple practice to keep you fighting if the time comes. Always use the KISS system......Keep It Simple Stupid.

    Stay Safe, practice with a purpose, and have a little fun!

    Hope some of this helps.
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

    (Sometimes) "a fight avioded is a fight won." ... claude clay

  6. #6
    Member Array ToddG's Avatar
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    Mods, hope it's ok to link to my site for this. If not, please delete ...

    drills @ pistol-training.com

    previous Drills of the Week at p-t.c
    Train Hard, Stay Safe!
    Todd Louis Green
    pistol-training.com

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array jeephipwr's Avatar
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    slow draw 1 shot, focus on putting each shot in the same hole
    slow draw 2 shots
    medium speed draw 2 shots
    failure to feed
    stove pipe
    double feed
    weak hand only
    strong hand only
    tactical reloads
    speed reloads
    firing around left hand barricades
    firing around right hand barricades
    engaging multiple targets in tactical priority
    repeat these as many times as neccessary before moving to the next one, alway practice each stage with shouting commands such as "stop", "call police" and MOVING TO SIDE
    end practice with precision shooting, such as head shots to work on precise trigger and sight control

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    A cut and paste of the semi-auto "qualification" course a couple of us at the gunshop developed. FOR THE RECORD, I do NOT support any kind of mandatory qualification for CCW. This is a skill drill we developed for our own use. I got blasted on another site by people assuming that I thought someone should have to "pass" this to get a CCW permit. I believe any mandated course from a government agency could too easily be made too difficult, too expensive, or impossible to attend easily.
    For your enjoyment (and still looking for thoughts on the Revolver course, too)

    We developed this course at the gunshop where I work. We were looking for a basic competency or skills drill. We wanted to do something without drawing and firing from the holster and that didn't involve a timer, so that it would fit with our range and rules. We added the controversial pelvic shot after some consideration, yes we know there are some strong opinions on this. As a paramedic, I happen to think it's a good idea. Not everybody does. We learned a few things as we employees tried to go through it, your input is welcome as always. Attached is a cut and paste of the original document. Feel free to copy. A snub and service revolver course is under development and we are eagerly seeking input in this.



    Basic training drills for self defense: Semi-auto drill.
    This is a simple set of exercises to evaluate defensive shooting ability. The goal is to complete the course of fire at the fastest pace that will allow you to keep a 100% score on the target. Smooth performance is better than fast misses. The reality is that this is practice on a well lit range without the stress and Adrenaline rush of a lethal force shooting. If you are unable to perform these drills at a reasonable speed under these conditions, take a serious look at your ability to defend yourself with a handgun.

    Requirements:
    Pistol, 50 rounds of ammunition, spare magazine, eye and ear protection, one silhouette target.

    The Rules:
    #1 SAFETY FIRST! Be aware of your muzzle and trigger finger at all times. The margin of error is 0%. Sights off of target = finger off of trigger. Do not move your support hand in front of the gun. No excuses! No exceptions!

    #2 Reloads are required at some points. If you rely on a pistol for defense, spare ammo is a must. A spare magazine carrier is recommended. A speed reload is done with an empty gun and the empty magazine should be allowed to fall free if possible. A tactical reload (also called “reload with retention”) requires the shooter to retain a partially used magazine, usually in a pocket. Note that in these drills, sometimes the retained magazine will be empty.

    #3 Do not be afraid to ask for help or advice.

    #4 No cheating. Use your everyday defense pistol and gear, no match guns or race guns. You get out of practice what you put in.

    #5 Hits must be in the center of mass (COM) of the target to count. Head and pelvis only count when specified as a target in the course of fire. Shots to the target’s gun hand or other “luck shots” do not count. For targets with score rings, COM is anything inside the 8 ring. For picture targets, estimate the vital zone. Pelvis hits must be below the belt line.

    #6 Low ready position means the gun held parallel to the floor, elbows tucked in tight to the chest. One hand ready means the gun held parallel to the floor in one hand, the other hand and arm should be tucked into the chest or held tight against the body well out of the way of the muzzle.

    #7 At close range, beware that muzzle blast may swing the target back. You may have to move the target further away if it swings excessively.

    #8 Don't forget to scan the area around you after you are done firing (the target is "Down") but keep aware of your muzzle direction. The range is not safe 360 degrees so muzzles must be kept downrange.


    Semi-auto course of fire:
    (Set target at 5 feet, load 5 rounds into the gun)
    1: At 5 feet, fire 5 rounds COM from the two hand ready position.
    (Load 2 rounds in gun, 3 in spare)
    2: At 5 feet from the one hand ready position, fire 2 shots to COM, speed reload, fire 2 shots to COM, 1 round to head. One handed shooting only.
    (Load 3 rounds in gun, 2 in spare)
    3: At 5 feet, from the 2 hand ready position, fire 3 shots to COM two-handed, speed reload, fire two shots to pelvis using dominant hand only.
    (Load 4 rounds in gun, 1 in spare. Move target to 3 yards)
    4: At 3 yards, from the 2 hand ready position, fire 2 rounds, return to ready position.
    5: At 3 yards, from the 2 hand ready position, fire 2 rounds, speed reload, fire one round to head.
    (Load gun with 5 rounds)
    6: At 3 yards from the 2 hand ready position, fire 5 rounds COM.
    (Load 3 rounds in gun and 2 in spare. Move target to 5 yards and open 1 barricade, all further stages will use the barricade for cover)
    7: At 5 yards from the 2 hand ready position, fire 2 shots COM from behind cover of the barricade, tactical reload behind cover, fire 3 more rounds COM.
    (Load 10 rounds in gun if possible, otherwise load 5 and 5)
    8: At 5 yards, one hand ready position, fire 5 shots COM with dominant side hand only. Behind cover, carefully switch to non-dominant hand and fire 5 rounds COM with non-dominant hand only. If a reload is needed, do so behind cover.
    (Load 5 rounds in gun, start next to barricade, not behind it. Move target to 7 yards.)
    9: From the 2 hand ready position at 7 yards, fire 3 shots COM 2 handed, move behind cover, fire 2 shots COM with dominant hand only.
    (Load 5 rounds in gun, start next to barricade, not behind it.
    10: From the 2 hand ready position at 7 yards, fire 2 shots to COM, sidestep to barricade, fire 2 shots to pelvis, kneel and fire last shot to head.


    Score: 43 COM hits, 4 pelvis hits, 3 head hits.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Frogbones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldshellback View Post
    Here's a couple of drills I like to run when I've got the outdoor range to myself.....

    Close-in drill: Have your target at the three to five yard marker and practice drawing/unholstering and engageing. Two shots. Go slowly, this is ment to create 'muscle/movement' memory and 'point shooting'/combat accuracy.

    Reload drill: (works best if you have someone else to 'load' for you) Load a squib/plastic practice round in your mag (you shouldn't know where) and, while firing, your forced to "tap, rack, reassess". This is a drill to gain compentency when a FTF happens in combat. Target should not be farther than 10 yards.
    Also practice reloading your spare mag while engageing your target as well.

    Whenever at the range, put a couple of mags worth of rounds through your EDC weak-hand only....one to two shots at 3-5 yards.

    Whenever practicing any drill (new or otherwise) go SLOWLY.......
    Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast.........and don't get caught up with the accuracy at distance. Nearly ALL gunfights happen between five to 20 feet. (Think roughly a car length) You HAVE to hit what you aim at WRT real-world distances. Always shoot some at the 10, 15, and 20 yard ranges, just don't focus on that.......hitting center-mass at 5, 7, and 10 yards is desired.

    Hint: don't get 'fancy' or 'flashy'.......BASICS. No "Hollywood"stuff, this is simple practice to keep you fighting if the time comes. Always use the KISS system......Keep It Simple Stupid.

    Stay Safe, practice with a purpose, and have a little fun!

    Hope some of this helps.
    HEH, Well that's about 99.9% of exactly what the wife and I do haha. I was going to type full reply but I have a like minded patron...saved me time and keystrokes.

    Though my training takes place on a self made range on family land that I/we tweaked for this kind of training. Mounds of dirt to simulate cover/obsticles etc. etc.

    Having someone else load the mags and dump a dummy round or two in to sim. a jam or the like.

    Thanks goldshellback

  10. #10
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    I really like to shoot with a buddy, when we go out we will call the targets for each other.

    From 3 yards, shoot target specified as #1 until caller says to change targets. This is great practice at not expecting when the target is no longer a threat. Using different colored targets helps a lot with this also, that way the caller can specify the target to shoot easily.

    Change distances, callers, and have the caller load in snap caps as well. This teaches you to practice clearing jams and such. Also, the caller can choose how many rounds need to be fired at a target. Good COM hits or head shots should be taken into account and speed up the target change.

    Remember, MOVE, MOVE, MOVE. Moving helps you not get hit.

    The caller can also force you to shoot a full mag or more at a single target to help with reloading drills. Part of the game is to follow the caller, you may only need 1 or 2, but you may need 16....that really makes it fun and interesting. Work with your shooting buddies to develope a points system, and make it a competition, but remember....Safety is of utmost importance!
    Last edited by sigmanluke; May 14th, 2009 at 02:56 PM. Reason: more
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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
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    I would recommend getting an IDPA handbook, and follow the course of fire for the IDPA classifier; This is an outstanding method for determining your skill level, as it was derived from the original IPSC stuff and the modern techniques that Jeff Cooper and the original SWPL combat masters pioneered back in the late '60s and early '70s; none of those requirements for speed and accuracy have changed over the years, and they ae a universal benchmark for the proficiency of the shooter.

    Still, for me one of the simplest drills of all involves 3 IPSC or IDPA targets and twelve rounds of ammunition, running the drill "El Presidente". To me, it is the ultimate test in the most efficient way to test the ability of the shooter to engage multiple targets, move and perform a reload and then shoot again. You can even modify the drill to reflect things like tactical order, etc. here are my benchmarks for running "El Prez":

    15+ seconds with all hits in "A" or Zero down - Novice
    10-15 seconds same as above - intermediate
    8-10 seconds - Expert
    5-7 seconds - Master
    5 seconds and below - God with a handgun....

    These times are based on your carry gun and an IDPA legal hip holster and Mag carrier. No game gear of any kind! My personal best time with the gun you see as my avatar was 5.87 seconds with all my hits on IPSC targets 2 years ago.....
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

  12. #12
    Ex Member Array ProShooter's Avatar
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    Tap, rack, bang is a must.

  13. #13
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    Well, I never practice to time standards although; I do follow a particular drill of single-shot firing at 5 & 10 yards. I follow-up with double-taps in the same fashion. Depending on the day, I incorporate different stances and repeat.
    Regards,
    “Monsters are real and so are ghosts. They live inside of us, and sometimes they win.”
    ~ Stephen King

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    When I was with the Utah Polite Society, we did one called the triangle drill quite a bit.

    This drill requires 5 targets and three 'bases' (we used 2ft square rubber mats). Lay the bases out in a triangle, about 3 yards on a side, pointing downrange. Label the targets with the numbers from 1-5 and scatter them from one to five yards downrange of the furthest base. Optional: place some pieces of cover in or near the triangle. We often put a barrel in the middle of a triangle and a barricade off to either side.

    The shooter walks the triangular path between the bases. The RO calls out the numbers of one or more targets (calling out numbers higher than 5 to mess with the shooter is fair game). As soon as the shooter hears the numbers, he must get off the X, draw, and neutralize the targets with the numbers the RO called. Note that the shooter may be facing uprange when the RO calls out the numbers, in which case they should be sure to turn, then draw, in order to avoid muzzle sweeping anyone.

    Another one we use a couple of times was the back up drill. Start standing arms length from the target. On the fire command, draw and shoot from the retention position, neutralizing the target. Reholster and take one step back. On the fire command draw and shoot from half extension, neutralizing the target. Reholster and take one step back. Then draw and fire from 3/4ths extension. Take another step back and draw and fire from full extension.

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