Dry train?

Dry train?

This is a discussion on Dry train? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I know a lot of us dry fire for trigger and sight discipline. Given the cost of ammo these days...who of us dry train? I ...

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Thread: Dry train?

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    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Dry train?

    I know a lot of us dry fire for trigger and sight discipline. Given the cost of ammo these days...who of us dry train? I sometimes will practice "shooting" on the move (WITH AN EMPTY GUN) through my house and what not sometimes on the range. It seems to help with shooting in my local competitions. and my overall confidence in muscle memory, drawstroke , etc.
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    Senior Member Array gdm320's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwhite75 View Post
    I know a lot of us dry fire for trigger and sight discipline. Given the cost of ammo these days...who of us dry train? I sometimes will practice "shooting" on the move (WITH AN EMPTY GUN) through my house and what not sometimes on the range. It seems to help with shooting in my local competitions. and my overall confidence in muscle memory, drawstroke , etc.
    I suppose it's better than doing nothing... but it's still not entirely effective. Your muscle memory is thrown off by not having to compensate for the weapon's kick, your drawstroke is thrown off because you're not drawing with a fully weighted weapon... and so on.
    "Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death." -- General Omar Bradley

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    Any practice, can be an effective aid to your overall ability...
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    Member Array bornlucky's Avatar
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    That is basically what I do these days. Going on over a year of no work, have to cut expensives. I visit the range only once monthly and shoot a box of 50. I take my sweet time enjoying every moment!

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    Distinguished Member Array PastorPack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdm320 View Post
    I suppose it's better than doing nothing... but it's still not entirely effective. Your muscle memory is thrown off by not having to compensate for the weapon's kick, your drawstroke is thrown off because you're not drawing with a fully weighted weapon... and so on.
    I agree that it is not the same as a loaded weapon, but would like to point out the the advantage of dry fire is exactly that you are not "compensating for the weapon's kick."

    Another word for compensate is flinching and dry fire actually helps guard against flinching. It is also brutally honest--if you have a flinch you will see it immediately when dry firing.
    God is love (1 John 4:8)

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    Member Array AceHi's Avatar
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    I try to dry practice a couple times a week for 15-20 minutes and I believe it helps tremendously (regardless of the lack of recoil and difference in weight). However, I am pretty disciplined about it. I do it in a special area where there is no ammo and with a target attached to a solid outside wall. Moving is good since you can't usually even do that at a range. The draw stroke from concealment, acquiring a sight picture, taking the slack out of the trigger, and a smooth trigger squeeze are what I primarily focus on and I am convinced it helps.
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    Member Array mfcmb's Avatar
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    I practice a couple of times a week with a laser (ArmaLaser) that turns on when I put my finger in the trigger guard. That way I can draw and aim, then test my aim by turning on the laser, then watch the beam as I pull the trigger to train myself to pull smoothly.

    I practice under many different lighting conditions, with many different targets scattered around my yard, from a variety of distances.

    I also practice moving, turning, etc. while drawing, aiming and "firing".

    I recognize that it's not the same as live fire, but I still think it's very useful: for example I can practice draws and movements, etc. that might be dangerous with live ammo, until I get the basic moves down.

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    Member Array medicineball's Avatar
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    Jeff Cooper recommends 100 dry snaps a day. 'Nuff said.

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    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by medicineball View Post
    Jeff Cooper recommends 100 dry snaps a day. 'Nuff said.
    Agreed, 'nuff said.

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    ctm
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfcmb View Post
    I practice a couple of times a week with a laser (ArmaLaser) that turns on when I put my finger in the trigger guard. That way I can draw and aim, then test my aim by turning on the laser, then watch the beam as I pull the trigger to train myself to pull smoothly.

    I practice under many different lighting conditions, with many different targets scattered around my yard, from a variety of distances.

    I also practice moving, turning, etc. while drawing, aiming and "firing".

    I recognize that it's not the same as live fire, but I still think it's very useful: for example I can practice draws and movements, etc. that might be dangerous with live ammo, until I get the basic moves down.
    +1
    I also use my laser the same, especially to practice rolling out of bed, grabbing my P220 from the night stand, and aiming at the door.

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    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    I don't dry fire as much as do Gun Kata, this sums it up...

    Kata Concept
    Those who practice martial arts have long understood the concept of kata. Kata is a system of basic body positioning and movement exercises. What they also understand is that the subconscious does not know the difference between imagined practice or the real thing, which brings us to the next link in kata, imagery and visualization.

    What the martial artist is doing while going through the movements of kata, is visualizing throwing or blocking punches, kicking, effecting holds, throws, joint locks, etc. Use the same principals to visualize firing the pistol, not only employing the proper technique but by using it to stop an attack.

    This is the reason we shoot at silhouettes. A normal person is averse to shooting people. The military has long known that troops trained to shoot bulls-eyes are very reluctant to shoot at the enemy. When training involves a repetitive shooting of images that are representative of humans (silhouettes), the tendency to shoot when it becomes necessary is greatly increased.

    These principals of the mind’s inner workings, imagery and visualization, coupled with the way that the mind and body interact to adopt learned psycho-motor skills through repetition, are all put to use in dry fire training.

    Put aside any doubts about the effectiveness of dry fire. Try it by going to the range and shoot a specific course of fire. Score your target. Now, dry fire the same course, complete with the same shooting positions, using a barricade or not. Do this every day for a week, then go out and try it again with live fire. You will see a marked improvement in your shooting, not to mention an increased smoothness of gun handling, and a boost in confidence. The more repetitions performed, the more precise those learned psycho-motor skills will be when you are called upon to use them. Under stress, you have a tendency to do as you train, assuming your training is sufficient, often, in a state that could be compared to autopilot.

    Acquiring and maintaining these learned skills require not only thousands of repetitions, but frequent “maintenance” to retain. These are perishable skills. Dry fire is a perfect way to do that maintenance.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    I dry fire train quite a bit actually. It used to be mainly for HD and PD purposes only, but I do a lot of dry draws and such for IPSC and steel challenge as well. I have learned a technique for the Glock pistols that lets you actually pull the trigger without releasing the striker and without having to subsequently rack the slide for each fire. That helps a lot.

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    Distinguished Member Array Agave's Avatar
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    Dry fire practice is as important as live fire practice. One is not a substitute for the other in my opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by gdm320 View Post
    Your muscle memory is thrown off by not having to compensate for the weapon's kick,
    I have a feeling you aim high or shoot low.
    The preceding post may contain sarcasm; it's just better that way. However, it is still intended with construction and with the Love of my L-rd Y'shua.

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    Senior Member Array Bob O's Avatar
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    I practice dry fire and with a laser much more than live fire.

    It's a great way to practice getting to the first shot (usually the most important shot) under many situations that you can't practice even on many ranges.

    After the first shot dry fire loses it's 'reality' due to lack of noise, recoil, reload, and possible malfunction recovery.

    Bobo
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    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ram Rod View Post
    I have learned a technique for the Glock pistols that lets you actually pull the trigger without releasing the striker and without having to subsequently rack the slide for each fire.
    Please expand on that.

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