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Tang Soo Do

This is a discussion on Tang Soo Do within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Nikolai I trained in Shorin Ji Ryu for several years (1st deg), and dabbled in Shotokan (blue belt) and Wing Chun. I ...

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Thread: Tang Soo Do

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikolai View Post
    I trained in Shorin Ji Ryu for several years (1st deg), and dabbled in Shotokan (blue belt) and Wing Chun.

    I used to attend a real Krav Maga class (from an Israel-approved instructor) and that is the only "style" (aside from Shorin Ji Ryu) that I truly felt contributed to practical self-defense. Of course, I would never confuse it with an actual martial art.

    I've heard interesting things about the old Russian Systema, but I have no idea if one could even find classes, and if so, whether it would top Krav Maga for practical application.

    EDIT - I neglected to mention that I took Capoeira for a while, and it's a great conditioning martial art.
    I heard they use a lot of scenarios in Krav Maga. You not only learn self-defense, you also keep yourself fit when doing Krav. I am considering enrolling it someday. Whew!!! It's been 9 yrs. since I ever had formal instruction, although I continue training on my own and with some partners as well as supplementing it with other techniques from other video programs (Sammy Franco's CFA/Hock's CQC/Kelly McCann's CQC). I think it'll be okay since I stay fit with combat conditioning/functional fitness training. And, in a formal training environment, I leave my ego out the door too and prefer to listen and learn.


  2. #32
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikolai View Post
    I trained in Shorin Ji Ryu for several years (1st deg), and dabbled in Shotokan (blue belt) and Wing Chun.

    I used to attend a real Krav Maga class (from an Israel-approved instructor) and that is the only "style" (aside from Shorin Ji Ryu) that I truly felt contributed to practical self-defense. Of course, I would never confuse it with an actual martial art.

    I've heard interesting things about the old Russian Systema, but I have no idea if one could even find classes, and if so, whether it would top Krav Maga for practical application.

    EDIT - I neglected to mention that I took Capoeira for a while, and it's a great conditioning martial art.
    Last time I ever heard of a Systema School is in Toronto by Vladimir Vasiliev. I used to buy his Systema videos (VHS format) and I say most of the techniques are very questionable. But there is no denying Vlad's speed and power when demonstrating his techniques. I still keep his videos from the now defunct TRS but is mainly for information regarding Russian history, including their martial arts heritage.

  3. #33
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Traditional chinese kenpo...street fighting at its best. Took Krav Maga back in the 80's, way before it became ''the thing'' here. It is a copy of Chinese Kenpo, which was watered down by Ed Parker and called American Kenpo for commercial purposes.

  4. #34
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Traditional chinese kenpo...street fighting at its best. Took Krav Maga back in the 80's, way before it became ''the thing'' here. It is a copy of Chinese Kenpo, which was watered down by Ed Parker and called American Kenpo for commercial purposes.
    Krav Maga consisted of combat effective techniques drawn from karate, kickboxing, combatives/streetfighting, and jujitsu. And it is continuing to evolve over the years as the techniques continue to get refined. It may look similar to Chinese Kenpo but it is way much different. Unlike other traditional arts, no katas or any ritualistic bowing, just sparring sessions/practice drills/conditioning training and scenarios. Again, the training curriculum all depends on the school and the instructor. Some Krav Maga is hard core and some is just watered down.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Array jhh3rd's Avatar
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    Do egg rolls come with the entree?

  6. #36
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Storm View Post
    Krav Maga consisted of combat effective techniques drawn karate, kickboxing, combatives/streetfighting, and jujitsu. It may look similar to Chinese Kenpo but it is way much different. Unlike other traditional arts, no katas or any ritualistic bowing, just sparring sessions/practice drills/conditioning training and scenarios.
    Like I said, I practiced it way before many people even heard of it back in the day while training in the Israel. It may have evolved since then, but most of its main strikes were taken from Chinese Kenpo.

  7. #37
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Like I said, I practiced it way before many people even heard of it back in the day while training in the Israel. It may have evolved since then, but most of its main strikes were taken from Chinese Kenpo.
    Well, most strikes from a certain style are a derivative of everything. Let's just conclude that they are universal in every way.

  8. #38
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Storm View Post
    Well, most strikes from a certain style are a derivative of everything. Let's just conclude that they are universal in every way.
    They are the same, true. But the philosophy of the applications differ, which influence different styles. In Kenpo and Krav, no kicks are made above the waist, and both emphasis striking with knees and elbows, preferring to close with the enemy and stomp and smash with an unrelenting ferocity that favors eye, throat and groin strikes, and smashing small bones with strikes to lar muscle groups. Neither of these 2 self defense systems could ever be used as a sport.

  9. #39
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laser Sailor View Post
    I might be a white belt still in Tang Soo Do, but I'm pretty sure I'm a black belt in Klik Pao.
    OMG I laughed so hard I got drool on my shirt!

    //Write "klik pao" to long term memory!

    -

    P.S. - That was even better than James Brown's statement in his song 'The Payback' where he says; "I don't know karate...But I know ka-razor!".
    James Brown - The Payback / Hits medley (Midnight Special 1974)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPfLF2_BSRg
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  10. #40
    New Member Array burton62's Avatar
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    Tang Soo Do Mi Guk Kwan - I think i was in it for 6 or 8 years. Long time ago, but after getting my black belt (midnight blue) I have never had a practical use for it. I learned some good self defense while i was in though.
    A person who demands further gun control legislation is like a chicken who roots for Colonel Sanders. ~Larry Elder

  11. #41
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    Then it is street effective. Nothing wrong learning any style, traditional or eclectic, as long as you are keeping realistic for the street. Another thing, do you use fancy techniques? I like it to be simple, pragmatic, practical, and offensive-based.
    We learn both the elaborate and the simple. I love headbutts, knees to the groin or rips and hits to the neck :p
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  12. #42
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Growing old has advantages. It occurred to me after years and large sums of money on hand combat war arts, that it would all be for nothing if hit with one 25cent bullet fired from a cheap gun of an unskilled thug. So now I practice glock-Fu .

  13. #43
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    It occurred to me after years and large sums of money on hand combat war arts, that it would all be for nothing if
    Mistaken reasoning. The practice of martial arts - hard style, soft style, internal style, classical or street combat - is only partially about self-defense. Train hard, train long, and train right and you'll have an advantage over those without training. You won't necessarily win, but if not it won't be because you didn't prepare.

    Other components of training can include health, strength, balance, flexibility and mental acuity. Training can provide reflexes to ensure action instead of choking. It can build situational awareness. It can add skill with various weapons. Including firearms.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  14. #44
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    as evidenced in this thread

    http://www.defensivecarry.com/vbulle...ink-about.html

    knowing how to use your firearm isn't always enough
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  15. #45
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    I started with the World Tang Soo Do Federation in 1983 when I was still in high school. I stayed with it and earned my Cho Dan (1st degree black (midnight blue) belt) in 1987. I got distracted for several years (college, beer, chicks, jobs... the usual ) but got back into martial arts in 1994 with what was then the US Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan Federation, now known as the US Soo Bahk Do Moo Duk Kwan Federation.

    When I made the change, I also opted to start over from white belt, mainly due to the length of time that I was out of practice and the difference in technique as taught in the different federations. I worked my way back up to dan level again and advanced to E dan (2nd degree black belt). I have enjoyed my training and it has saved my bacon a time or 3. However, the best benefit by far has been the oppurtunity to meet people who have been life long friends and the added confidence that it has given me on all levels, work, relationships, you name it. I would happily do it all over again.

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