Benchmade 520 Presidio - My New EDC

This is a discussion on Benchmade 520 Presidio - My New EDC within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Very NICE! The handling and feeling, opening and Axis lock are wonderful. I've got the mini-Presido (525) which I like, but if I had to ...

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Thread: Benchmade 520 Presidio - My New EDC

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Very NICE!

    The handling and feeling, opening and Axis lock are wonderful.

    I've got the mini-Presido (525) which I like, but if I had to do it over again I would get the 520.

    Enjoy.
    Martial Blade Concepts, Jiu-Jitsu & Eskrima NRA, GOA, NYSRPA, LIF, Old Bethpage Rifle & Pistol Club

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Beautiful knife. Looks very effective.

    I'm cautious about lock varieties, too. On the Spyderco Native FRN, the large thumb hole affords a great way to safely open the blade while keeping the fingers away from the blade path. S30V, here, though I wish it would hold an edge longer. In my experience with use several times a week on various materials, the "surgically" sharp cutting edge doesn't seem last more than a couple months. More-frequent sharpening is about the only flaw I can see. I'd love it if the large thumb hole were mated to an outside surface like that shown on your 520 Presidio, there.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Beautiful knife. Looks very effective.

    I'm cautious about lock varieties, too. On the Spyderco Native FRN, the large thumb hole affords a great way to safely open the blade while keeping the fingers away from the blade path. S30V, here, though I wish it would hold an edge longer. In my experience with use several times a week on various materials, the "surgically" sharp cutting edge doesn't seem last more than a couple months. More-frequent sharpening is about the only flaw I can see. I'd love it if the large thumb hole were mated to an outside surface like that shown on your 520 Presidio, there.
    Yep - thumb studs. Once you've had 'em, the Spyderco "hole" thing just seems way too slow. I love Spydies .. have two, but neither has the "hole". I've yet to find an automatic knife that can be deployed faster than I can deploy a good thumb-studded no-assist folder.
    Billy
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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Yep - thumb studs. Once you've had 'em, the Spyderco "hole" thing just seems way too slow.
    Can't seem to get used to the thumb studs, myself. Actually, I find the thumb hole far more usable. Although, ESEE has just come out with a new folder, the DPx H*E*S*T, with thumb studs. Now, that's one that might be worth trying. Same crew that brought us the ESEE 5 and other wonderful blades.

    I've yet to find an automatic knife that can be deployed faster than I can deploy a good thumb-studded no-assist folder.
    It's all so subjective, from person to person. Good thing we've got such a great selection of decent knives.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
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    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Yep - thumb studs. Once you've had 'em, the Spyderco "hole" thing just seems way too slow.
    No disrespect intended but...baloney! :)

    Thumb hole or thumb stub, it only takes practice.

    For that matter with the 520, or its smaller brother the 525, there is no need to touch the thumbstud. The thing flies open just about by itself using an inertial openning.
    Martial Blade Concepts, Jiu-Jitsu & Eskrima NRA, GOA, NYSRPA, LIF, Old Bethpage Rifle & Pistol Club

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword View Post
    No disrespect intended but...baloney! :)

    Thumb hole or thumb stub, it only takes practice.

    For that matter with the 520, or its smaller brother the 525, there is no need to touch the thumbstud. The thing flies open just about by itself using an inertial openning.
    To inertia-open any Axis lock, you have to disengage the lock. To wrist-flick this knife open, would require a way-too-obnoxious wrist-flick that would gather a LOT of unwanted attention, at least by my standards.

    I've never seen anyone that's able to thumb-flick open a Spyder-hole knife. Never. Not on youtube, not in reality, and I've owned a few Spyerco's myself. Most everything I've ever seen with hole-openings involves sticking your thumb in the hole and deliberately rotating the hole around the pivot point in an arc motion.

    Thumb studs allow you to simply flick your thumb like you're flicking a quarter off of your index finger and the blade snaps open. I've yet to find an automatic knife that deploys faster than a thumb-flick for example. If you can open a thumb-hole knife as quickly as a thumb-stud knife, can you use your phone or camera to shoot a short video of it ... I'd be interested in seeing it done.
    Billy
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  8. #22
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    To inertia-open any Axis lock, you have to disengage the lock. To wrist-flick this knife open, would require a way-too-obnoxious wrist-flick that would gather a LOT of unwanted attention, at least by my standards.
    Have you ever actually handled a Benchmade knife with an Axis lock? You do not have to disengage the lock to do an inertial opening because in the closed condition the lock is not engaged.

    For a detailed description of the Axis lock go here:

    http://www.benchmade.com/about_knive...mechanisms.asp

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    I've never seen anyone that's able to thumb-flick open a Spyder-hole knife. Never.
    Have you every seen anyone inertial open a Spyderco Delica (much harder to do then a thumb-flick opening)?

    Here is a video of me doing an inertial opening with a Delica. Again, it is much harder to do a basic inertial opening with a Delica versus the thumb-flick opening (marble shoot opening) since you're not adding the force of the thumb-flick against the thumb hole to assist in the opening.

    http://s1215.photobucket.com/albums/...tialDelica.mp4

    This is a factory as/is Delica. Nothing was done to loosen the pivot screw and I've done inertial openings on numerous Delica's and dozens of other Spyderco knives.

    Again, it does require proper technique and practice but most Spyderco and Benchmade knives can be opened very fast using a thumb-flick and/or inertial opening.
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  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword View Post
    Have you ever actually handled a Benchmade knife with an Axis lock? You do not have to disengage the lock to do an inertial opening because in the closed condition the lock is not engaged.
    Um. Those are my pictures at the top of this thread and that is my very own 520 Presidio. It is on me right now. Prior to that I've had a Griptilian and a 950 Rift .... both Axis locks. While the Axis lock does not LOCK a blade in the closed position, the mechanism does put spring pressure on the blade which does offer enough resistance that wrist flicks need to be done with serious gusto to actually get the blade to deploy.


    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword
    Have you every seen anyone inertial open a Spyderco Delica (much harder to do then a thumb-flick opening)?

    Here is a video of me doing an inertial opening with a Delica. Again, it is much harder to do a basic inertial opening with a Delica versus the thumb-flick opening (marble shoot opening) since you're not adding the force of the thumb-flick against the thumb hole to assist in the opening.

    http://s1215.photobucket.com/albums/...tialDelica.mp4

    This is a factory as/is Delica. Nothing was done to loosen the pivot screw and I've done inertial openings on numerous Delica's and dozens of other Spyderco knives.

    Again, it does require proper technique and practice but most Spyderco and Benchmade knives can be opened very fast using a thumb-flick and/or inertial opening.
    Okay, I just watched your video and I need to clarify a bit.

    1) I don't like inertia opening for the following reasons:

    A) Space is limited in some situations. I once wrist-flicked a Smith & Wesson folder I had on me and slammed my hand into a concrete wall I happened to have been standing next to. On top of the pain, the knife was knocked from my hand. My BIL was showing me a new Cold Steel product he'd recently acquired and he managed to put the tip of said new product through some drywall

    B) Stealth is preferred in many situations where speed is of concern and no one can ever say that inertia openings are "stealthy". When I am walking in neighborhoods that are questionable, I move my EDC to my right-rear pocket (where my wallet is). In the event that I was being mugged, I may want to hand over my wallet, or I may decide that I need to defend myself in which case I would want to be able to pull out my knife, deploy it while still behind my back as quietly as possible, and then attack my assailant. I challenge anyone to inertia-open a knife behind their back while still making it look like they're simply pulling out a wallet.

    C) Inertia-openings while fun, are rather Commando-ish. Previously in my technology career, I did a lot of opening of new computer equipment. I mean A LOT (2800 servers, over 1100 desktops, and enough keyboards and mice to make your head spin). This was on a very large trading floor in downtown NYC a few blocks from the New York Stock Exchange. Write-flicking a tactical folder was a good way to land myself on the unemployment line ... and that would have been the easy let-off since NYC laws are quite vague on carrying a knife and I've heard wildly varying "opinions" from local PD including an NYPD sergeant I happen to have in the family. Instead, I used the thumb-flick ... a movement that grabbed no one's peripheral vision and kept me and my small knife under the radar. The previously mentioned BIL - he uses the wrist-flick and no other methods. Many in the family consider it to be nothing more than him showing off when he wrist-flicks - the entire action is looked upon negatively by those who are not into knives.

    2) My initial comment about thumb studs being great refers to their speed of deployment over the thumb-hole - I am not considering the inertia method because of the reasons outlined above, I just do not like it. When comparing the thumb-hole to the thumb-stud ... I find a massive speed difference between the two and I also find that the thumb-stud allows my hand to stay in a consistent position which allows me to keep better control of the knife.
    Billy
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  10. #24
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Um. Those are my pictures at the top of this thread and that is my very own 520 Presidio. It is on me right now. Prior to that I've had a Griptilian and a 950 Rift .... both Axis locks. While the Axis lock does not LOCK a blade in the closed position, the mechanism does put spring pressure on the blade which does offer enough resistance that wrist flicks need to be done with serious gusto to actually get the blade to deploy.
    Excuse my error regarding who posted what.

    Having said that if you find an inertial or thumb stud opening difficult on a 520 or Griptilian due to the spring tension you need some formal instruction on the proper technique to impliment these openings. I've taught students how to do them consistently in ten minutes. The key is proper technique.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Okay, I just watched your video and I need to clarify a bit.

    1) I don't like inertia opening for the following reasons:

    A) Space is limited in some situations. I once wrist-flicked a Smith & Wesson folder I had on me and slammed my hand into a concrete wall I happened to have been standing next to. On top of the pain, the knife was knocked from my hand. My BIL was showing me a new Cold Steel product he'd recently acquired and he managed to put the tip of said new product through some drywall

    B) Stealth is preferred in many situations where speed is of concern and no one can ever say that inertia openings are "stealthy". When I am walking in neighborhoods that are questionable, I move my EDC to my right-rear pocket (where my wallet is). In the event that I was being mugged, I may want to hand over my wallet, or I may decide that I need to defend myself in which case I would want to be able to pull out my knife, deploy it while still behind my back as quietly as possible, and then attack my assailant. I challenge anyone to inertia-open a knife behind their back while still making it look like they're simply pulling out a wallet.

    C) Inertia-openings while fun, are rather Commando-ish. Previously in my technology career, I did a lot of opening of new computer equipment. I mean A LOT (2800 servers, over 1100 desktops, and enough keyboards and mice to make your head spin). This was on a very large trading floor in downtown NYC a few blocks from the New York Stock Exchange. Write-flicking a tactical folder was a good way to land myself on the unemployment line ... and that would have been the easy let-off since NYC laws are quite vague on carrying a knife and I've heard wildly varying "opinions" from local PD including an NYPD sergeant I happen to have in the family. Instead, I used the thumb-flick ... a movement that grabbed no one's peripheral vision and kept me and my small knife under the radar. The previously mentioned BIL - he uses the wrist-flick and no other methods. Many in the family consider it to be nothing more than him showing off when he wrist-flicks - the entire action is looked upon negatively by those who are not into knives.

    2) My initial comment about thumb studs being great refers to their speed of deployment over the thumb-hole - I am not considering the inertia method because of the reasons outlined above, I just do not like it. When comparing the thumb-hole to the thumb-stud ... I find a massive speed difference between the two and I also find that the thumb-stud allows my hand to stay in a consistent position which allows me to keep better control of the knife.
    The Delica is near the extreme side of difficulty with respect to inertial or thumb-flick openings. If you really want to challenge yourself try it with a flat ground Delica or an Urban but make sure your medical insurance premium is paid first and covers dislocationed joints ;).

    As far as a Benchmade Presidio, Griptilian, Gravitator, mini-Ambush or Spyderco Endura, Native, Yojimbo, Military and many other knives with thumb hole or thumb studs are concerned, I can withdraw the knife from my pocket and open it within a few inches from the pocket, and with most of them I can do it left or right side. It does not require a lot of room. The demonstration with the Delica was done from a frontal view for the sake of the video. I can do a thumb-flick opening with the knife very close to my strong side pocket.

    Finally, back to the original comment about thumb-stud versus thumb-hole, the easy and speed of opening probably has much more to do with individual experience with one type or the other versus anything very much difference in the mechanics of opening a knife with a thumb-stud versus a hole. I don't find much difference in the ability to open either type but to each his own.

    Commando-ish...in our PC society yes, I guess either opening (inertial or thumb-flick) is veiwed as commando-ish. At speed it's probably difficult for the uninitiated to tell the difference between the two.
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  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword View Post
    Excuse my error regarding who posted what.

    Having said that if you find an inertial or thumb stud opening difficult on a 520 or Griptilian due to the spring tension you need some formal instruction on the proper technique to impliment these openings. I've taught students how to do them consistently in ten minutes. The key is proper technique.
    You're not reading what I'm writing. I know that inertia-openings are possible with my 520 and with other Axis knives. I do practice them, but more as a novelty. Inertia-openings on even the easiest knives are still quite inefficient and grab way too much attention in my opinion. Where did I ever say I had a problem using a thumb stud to open a knife? What I said was that wrist-flicking an Axis knife needs to be done with gusto ... oomph if you prefer. Your video backs up my point 100%.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword
    The Delica is near the extreme side of difficulty with respect to inertial or thumb-flick openings. If you really want to challenge yourself try it with a flat ground Delica or an Urban but make sure your medical insurance premium is paid first and covers dislocationed joints ;).

    As far as a Benchmade Presidio, Griptilian, Gravitator, mini-Ambush or Spyderco Endura, Native, Yojimbo, Military and many other knives with thumb hole or thumb studs are concerned, I can withdraw the knife from my pocket and open it within a few inches from the pocket, and with most of them I can do it left or right side. It does not require a lot of room. The demonstration with the Delica was done from a frontal view for the sake of the video. I can do a thumb-flick opening with the knife very close to my strong side pocket.

    Finally, back to the original comment about thumb-stud versus thumb-hole, the easy and speed of opening probably has much more to do with individual experience with one type or the other versus anything very much difference in the mechanics of opening a knife with a thumb-stud versus a hole. I don't find much difference in the ability to open either type but to each his own.

    Commando-ish...in our PC society yes, I guess either opening (inertial or thumb-flick) is veiwed as commando-ish. At speed it's probably difficult for the uninitiated to tell the difference between the two.
    I just watched your video again. You hand moves a total distance of at least a foot and a half .. it moves from the top of the video screen (which is up near but not completely up to your shoulder, and yes, I'm considering the camera angle) all the way down to at least your belly button if not your belt line. I'm not even including the distance your hand must first move from your pocket to the max height before you bring your arms down.

    My hand moves 0 inches deploying via thumb-flick. 0. My thumb moves a total of about 1 inch from blade-closed to blade fully deployed. I am very familiar with wrist-flick technique, I used it to open knives for years before I found my affiliation for thumb studs. I just spent a few minutes trying to see what the least obtrusive way was that I could use my wrist to deploy my 520 and ultimately I could do it with what I estimate to be about 8 to 10" worth of wrist movement. To overcome the spring pressure of the Axis lock, it has to be a very quick movement and the blade snaps into place with a relatively loud slap - enough that my co-worker took a look over to see what I was doing. Again, not my definition of "stealthy" or "unobtrusive". I know it works, and I know it can be done ... but I still find the inertia-opening to be way too tacti-cool and not tacti-practical enough for my liking.

    I also think that there is a VERY significant difference between the two to the uninitiated eye (and ear). To go back to my prior box-opening-job example ... I used to thumb-flick between my legs while under a desk on the floor, behind my back standing or crouching, and very often while laying down on the ground under a desk .... with no discernible movement other than the blade deploying. No arm/hand movement whatsoever.

    Yes, the mechanics are significantly different with hole versus stud. On full size folders ... I find that to properly open a thumb-hole knife, I need to reposition the knife in my hand, rotate the blade with the thumb, then reposition the knife back into a secure position in my hand. Every video I've ever seen of someone opening via thumb-hole has shown me the exact same thing. If someone can show me how they can open a thumb-hole folder as quickly as they can a thumb-stud folder - I'd LOVE to see how it's done because either I'm not working the thumb-hole properly, or they're not working the thumb-stud properly.
    Billy
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  12. #26
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    You're not reading what I'm writing. I know that inertia-openings are possible with my 520 and with other Axis knives. I do practice them, but more as a novelty. Inertia-openings on even the easiest knives are still quite inefficient and grab way too much attention in my opinion. Where did I ever say I had a problem using a thumb stud to open a knife? What I said was that wrist-flicking an Axis knife needs to be done with gusto ... oomph if you prefer. Your video backs up my point 100%.
    Not to belabor the issue but your comment "To inertia-open any Axis lock, you have to disengage the lock. To wrist-flick this knife open, would require a way-too-obnoxious wrist-flick that would gather a LOT of unwanted attention, at least by my standards." tells me you don't understand the dynamics or mechanics involved in an inertial openning. It does not require disengaging the lock and overcoming any spring tension requires minimal effort when you're talking about a knife like the Presidio or Griptilian. It does require some gusto with a Delica.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    I just watched your video again. You hand moves a total distance of at least a foot and a half .. it moves from the top of the video screen (which is up near but not completely up to your shoulder, and yes, I'm considering the camera angle) all the way down to at least your belly button if not your belt line. I'm not even including the distance your hand must first move from your pocket to the max height before you bring your arms down.
    As mentioned before the video was done from a frontal view where I typically would not do the inertial opening. In addition the inertial opening with a Delica is difficult and does take some practice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    I just spent a few minutes trying to see what the least obtrusive way was that I could use my wrist to deploy my 520 and ultimately I could do it with what I estimate to be about 8 to 10" worth of wrist movement. To overcome the spring pressure of the Axis lock, it has to be a very quick movement and the blade snaps into place with a relatively loud slap - enough that my co-worker took a look over to see what I was doing. Again, not my definition of "stealthy" or "unobtrusive". I know it works, and I know it can be done ... but I still find the inertia-opening to be way too tacti-cool and not tacti-practical enough for my liking.
    It sounds like you need more practice. I can do an inertial opening with a Presidio, Griptilian or for that matter a Spyderco Endura in the space it takes to rotate my hand at the side of my body with the knife just cleared of my pocket. It's a matter of proper technique and practice. If I have the opportunity this evening I'll make a video doing it with a few different knives including the Mini-Presidio.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    I also think that there is a VERY significant difference between the two to the uninitiated eye (and ear). To go back to my prior box-opening-job example ... I used to thumb-flick between my legs while under a desk on the floor, behind my back standing or crouching, and very often while laying down on the ground under a desk .... with no discernible movement other than the blade deploying. No arm/hand movement whatsoever.
    If you're talk the difference between an inertial opening and thumb-flick opening I beg to differ. Both will result in a quick release of the blade and the clack of the lock engaging. And if you do them both efficiently most people won't notice any difference in the movement of the hand, wrist and arm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Yes, the mechanics are significantly different with hole versus stud. On full size folders ... I find that to properly open a thumb-hole knife, I need to reposition the knife in my hand, rotate the blade with the thumb, then reposition the knife back into a secure position in my hand. Every video I've ever seen of someone opening via thumb-hole has shown me the exact same thing. If someone can show me how they can open a thumb-hole folder as quickly as they can a thumb-stud folder - I'd LOVE to see how it's done because either I'm not working the thumb-hole properly, or they're not working the thumb-stud properly.
    As mentioned, if I have the opportunity this evening I will oblige.
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    Member Array hankster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post

    I've never seen anyone that's able to thumb-flick open a Spyder-hole knife. Never. Not on youtube, not in reality, and I've owned a few Spyerco's myself. Most everything I've ever seen with hole-openings involves sticking your thumb in the hole and deliberately rotating the hole around the pivot point in an arc motion.
    I been thumbing em open for years . Dude , it ain't that tough . I think most of the time it's easier than with a thumb stud. Mainly depends on the knife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hankster View Post
    I been thumbing em open for years . Dude , it ain't that tough . I think most of the time it's easier than with a thumb stud. Mainly depends on the knife.
    Can you show video of how you do both? Or perhaps link to a youtube video of someone else opening via thumb-hole similarly to how you do? I'm interested to see the technique.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword View Post
    Not to belabor the issue but your comment "To inertia-open any Axis lock, you have to disengage the lock. To wrist-flick this knife open, would require a way-too-obnoxious wrist-flick that would gather a LOT of unwanted attention, at least by my standards." tells me you don't understand the dynamics or mechanics involved in an inertial openning. It does not require disengaging the lock and overcoming any spring tension requires minimal effort when you're talking about a knife like the Presidio or Griptilian. It does require some gusto with a Delica.
    Okay. The horse is definitely dead ... but I should explain this. On some knives, inertia-opening is simpler to do because of the location of the axis of rotation, weight distribution of the blade, lack of retention device built into the knife, and a few other factors. When oiled properly, my old Smith & Wesson folder was very easy to inertia-open - with a relatively small wrist-motion and an almost imperceivable arm motion compared for instance, to any of the Axis-lock knives I've had. What you are quoting is a relatively early quote of mine in this discussion - but what I meant is: The wrist/arm motion necessary to inertia-open my 520 is too much for my "off-the-radar" standards if you do not manually disengage the Axis retention during the maneuver. For me to even consider inertia-opening my 520, I would want, not need but want, to disengage the Axis lock to facilitate an easier opening with a significantly reduced hand/arm motion.

    The bottom line is that any hand/arm motion increases the visual footprint ... I would never want to deploy a knife in such a fashion if I was actually in a defensive scenario where I was counting on "surprise" to be one of the factors that would help me survive my confrontation ... an example being the aforementioned mugging example where a thief would be expecting me to produce a wallet, not a knife.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2edgesword
    It sounds like you need more practice. I can do an inertial opening with a Presidio, Griptilian or for that matter a Spyderco Endura in the space it takes to rotate my hand at the side of my body with the knife just cleared of my pocket. It's a matter of proper technique and practice. If I have the opportunity this evening I'll make a video doing it with a few different knives including the Mini-Presidio.

    If you're talk the difference between an inertial opening and thumb-flick opening I beg to differ. Both will result in a quick release of the blade and the clack of the lock engaging. And if you do them both efficiently most people won't notice any difference in the movement of the hand, wrist and arm.

    As mentioned, if I have the opportunity this evening I will oblige.
    I'm not totally grasping the full range of motion you're talking about in your first sentence here, but would love to see it visually. It's very possible I'm doing something incorrectly, but keep in mind that I've carried a folder for over a dozen years now and have played daily with whatever I've been carrying. In my opinion I'm fairly proficient at manipulating a folder.

    We'll have to agree to disagree on the sound of my 520 opening between the thumb and wrist-flick methods. On the thumb flick, the strength of my thumb overcomes the initial resistance provided by the Axis spring and the launches the blade the rest of the distance with considerably less speed than what happens when I inertia-open. The speed of the arm and wrist that is necessary to overcome the Axis spring tension makes the inertia-open considerably more "violent" and in the test I just did now, I'd have to say that the volume of the snap into place for the wrist-flick was easily double or more the volume of the thumb flick. There was a considerable difference in my opinion.

    That said, had this been my Smith & Wesson or any other knife that doesn't have a blade retention system like Axis knives do, the wrist/arm motion would not need to be as quick and would of course be quieter. We're definitely beating a dead horse here, I do really look forward to the videos though.
    Billy
    Fusion Tact-5 in a Pure Kustom Black-Ops Pro
    Glock 23 in a Barber Leatherworks IWB

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array 2edgesword's Avatar
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    Hi Billy,

    The following video demonstrates inertial openings with a wide assortment of knives. You'll notice that all of the openings are done with very little movement of the arm (mostly wrist action) and with the knife within a few inches of my side. None of these knives have had the pivot screw loosened to facilitate an opening. It's all proper technique and practice.

    http://s1215.photobucket.com/albums/...IOassorted.mp4

    The next video shows examples of a draw and opening using a marble shoot or thumb-flick opening with a Spyderco Delica and a thumb stud opening using a Benchmade Mini-Presidio. Both types of opens can be done fairly quickly so I don't see any real disparity between the thumb hole versus the thumb stud.

    http://s1215.photobucket.com/albums/...HolevsStud.mp4
    Last edited by 2edgesword; October 28th, 2010 at 08:46 AM.
    Martial Blade Concepts, Jiu-Jitsu & Eskrima NRA, GOA, NYSRPA, LIF, Old Bethpage Rifle & Pistol Club

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