Knives for Dummies

This is a discussion on Knives for Dummies within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Dummies like me that is> i always carried a lock blade or some blade. But i never paid attention, or read up on what material(s) ...

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Thread: Knives for Dummies

  1. #1
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    Knives for Dummies

    Dummies like me that is>
    i always carried a lock blade or some blade.
    But i never paid attention, or read up on what material(s) make a "quality" blade for it's intended purpose.
    **So i need to find the book "Knives for Dummies" especially now because>
    Like most of you i want to know that i got my money's worth or at least close to it if not a good deal, right.
    On my desk i'm look'n at a "NIB" bowie type 13.5 long w/8.5 blade AND wonder'n if for $88 i should "not" have bought it.
    Bowie type fixed blade is what i want but did i make a good choice? ? $90 is the top of my spending and i'm there.
    This is a 1085C tool-steel blade that is epoxy-coated Tatang model by Blackhawk(.com) headquarters in Va. made in none other than Taiwan, whatever that means
    Would you send 'er back

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  3. #2
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    You are right in the ballpark for that knife. I've seen it selling for slightly less NIB on Ebay.
    KA-BAR uses 1085C for their Machete blades & I have used one of those & that was a tough and rugged piece of steel.
    Like all blade steels though MUCH depends on how ANY steel was fully hardened and then tempered back.
    The only way to tell exactly how any particular knife will hold up under extremely hard use is to actually use it really hard and find out.

    These days (I guess) it is not so much WHERE on Planet Earth a knife is made but, how close attention is paid to quality control and construction.
    At one time "Made In Japan" was equated with "cheap" but, these days some of the best knife steel is of Japanese origin/manufacture.
    Very nice high quality knives have come out of Seki.
    COLD STEEL knives originate from China now and folks seems to not have any complaints regarding their purchases.
    My 2 GRYPHON Knives Terzula are Japan and they are individually MOHS hardness tested and are great large working knives though the handles get a bit slippery when wet....so I've wire wrapped them.

    I also really like Scrapyard Knives as well as the Ontario "RAT" RANDALL'S ADVENTURE TRAINING series knives in D-2 tool steel but, I've switched all of my survival & uber-serious woodcraft knives to BUSSE COMBAT Knife Co. knives since I honestly believe that nothing else tops the BUSSE INFI Steel. I AM a BUSSE believer now & I drink the BUSSE Kool-Aide with regard to SHTF & Survival use knives.
    NOT that INFI is some sort of magical, secret, steel alloy but, the BUSSE COMBAT proprietary hardening & tempering process makes it the proved and tested ultimate blade steel to stand up to abnormally rough use and downright torturous abuse.
    For that reason everything that I buy these days is BUSSE.

  4. #3
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlct View Post
    Dummies like me that is>
    i always carried a lock blade or some blade.
    But i never paid attention, or read up on what material(s) make a "quality" blade for it's intended purpose.
    **So i need to find the book "Knives for Dummies" especially now because>
    IIRC, Michael Janich's Street Steel was focused mainly on folders and also did not go into detailed discussions of knife-steels, etc., but I found it to have been an excellent primer on the basic considerations of what to purchase, as well as good academic preparation for the hows/whys of the deployment/employ of the blade, as a basis-for-understanding of live training and instruction.

  5. #4
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    That is some good info
    This Tatang pistol style grip is very functional, though slightly too thin & hard, good, but not love'n it
    The sheath has riveted holes down along each side making it easy to tie to the leg; nice since OL is 13"+
    Overall it seems good enough to put it through the test AND the S&H was free

    How would you rate/compare generally>
    Both knives similar size and style
    And for what they are (in their own category) of equal value
    A "420 ss" w/wraped metal handle @ $48
    vs
    the "1085C tool steel" blade w/hard but textured grip @88
    given carried often and seldom used

  6. #5
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    You can go to knifetests.com and watch the various knife destructive testing VIDS...but, WARNING they are so painfully SLOW MOVING that you'll want to poke your eyes out with a sharpened pencil by the time you somehow manage to sit through them.

    Here You Go...........~~~> CLICK HERE
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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