Good Knife Basics...

This is a discussion on Good Knife Basics... within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Knife attacks can be super nasty. The assailant will wish he had been shot if by disarming you, you cut him up. I would do ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20
Like Tree7Likes

Thread: Good Knife Basics...

  1. #16
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Knife attacks can be super nasty. The assailant will wish he had been shot if by disarming you, you cut him up. I would do this as a last ditch effort because with HIV, I'm not really going out of my way to produce a situation where I can get a lot of someone else's blood on me.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    Ex Member Array Glockologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South as it gets
    Posts
    3
    No doubt in close quarters a knife in the right hands is as deadly, if not more deadly than a gun. I don't want another man's blood all over me either, but I won't hesitate to go there if the situation dictates.

  4. #18
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by Glockologist View Post
    No doubt in close quarters a knife in the right hands is as deadly, if not more deadly than a gun. I don't want another man's blood all over me either, but I won't hesitate to go there if the situation dictates.
    I agree.

    Welcome to the forum!

  5. #19
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,015
    I've been working with edged weapons most of my life, and continue to train regularly. The article up top by Franco has some good points, but also some things that give me pause.

    First, I take issue with the idea that knife fighting is something that can be conceptually learned. Sure, you can pick up ideas from experts, but then you have to practice them in actual combat and hone your kinesthetic muscle memory and reflexes until they are automatic, just as you do with your firearm skills.

    One point I strongly urge readers to consider is that a knife is a tool. Any knife can be powerful and deadly - whether a top of the line SOG, Cold Steel, custom blade, RAT, Emerson, or just some simple slip joint folder or steak knife from your kitchen drawer.

    The techniques that serve you well in knife fighting can be applied to anything knife-like you can grab at hand. A screwdriver, a broken glass or bottle - anything at hand. A pen, even. So all this talk about how switchblades are not as good as fixed blades and so forth isn't practical. It's more like a "nice to have" kind of knowledge.

    My last knife purchase was a Frank Beltane 11" switchblade, because I've always wanted one and had the money available. No, it's not nearly as good as a TiLite or tanto or hissatsu or wazikashi or anything made for total all-out combat. But in a serious situation, I'd be glad to have it.

    Knives have brandishing, intimidation value just as guns do. You can pull out a small, black Kahr and maybe your assailant doesn't even realize you have a gun; you pull out a shiny .357, few people are going to fail to recognize that they are facing a firearm. You really don't want to shoot somebody if you can avoid it. So a silent, black fixed blade tanto or such is assuredly a great tool, but snapping out a 6" TiLite does have that "maybe you should reconsider" value to it that might end an encounter before it goes to the meat-cutting stage.

    And it matters whether you have a knife and the other fellow doesn't, or he does and you don't, or you both do. If you train regularly for H2H combat and practice grappling, throws, kicks and strikes, working on bags, with partners, sparring and so forth, you'll have an advantage in dealing with a knife scenario. Standard advice, like Franco's "expect to get cut" is certainly true, but knowing that won't be especially helpful absent preparation in advance.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  6. #20
    Member Array Gsolutions's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    70

    joining a little late but...

    I'm located in CA - unfortunately in Orange County where CCW's are rare since Sandra Hutchens took the Sheriff's seat. OK - rant off... things are what they are and when I got the chance to train with Mike Janich several years ago, I was amazed how much stopping power a knife has when it is used correctly.

    To come full circle on the OP... good knife basics: a solid knife, with pointy 3"-4" blade, straight/non-serrated edge, slip-proof grip and solid locking mechanism will suffice. Pair that with anatomical targeting (meaning you aim for critical muscles and tendons) and bringing the knife to the gunfight can level the playing field - unless the person with the gun is good with movement and combatives.

    This does by no means indicate that I would always prefer a knife over a firearm - If I could carry a sidearm, I would do so. However, having trained with Mike Janich directly twice (last time was this Summer) has increased my level of confidence in my knife techniques. I would highly recommend this type of training for everyone who carries a knife, whether it is as backup or primary. During the seminar in July we had people from 16 to late 50's adapt the techniques equally well.
    The best thing about the system is that it is simple and intuitive and that many applications carry easily over into the realm of unarmed combatives.

    So, as far as bringing the knife to the gunfight - it's not quite as easy as the ambush that Sean Connery set in the Untouchables. Try your gun material in a force-on-force setting against someone who has experience with the knife - make sure you are aware of what the knife is capable of, before you get monkey-trapped with your pistol. This is not bashing the use of a firearm - just an experience that I took from several force-on-force courses.
    Uli Gebhard
    Suarez International Staff Instructor California
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    www.gebhardsolutions.com

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

basics of knife fighting
,
best defensive knife
,
best defensive knives
,
fighting knives knife basics
,
good defensive knife
,
how to fight with a knife basics
,
knife combat basics
,
knife fighting
,

knife fighting basics

,
knife fighting targets
,
knife fighting techniques
,
knife fighting tips
Click on a term to search for related topics.