Sharpening stones

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Thread: Sharpening stones

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array 031131's Avatar
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    Sharpening stones

    How long did it take you to get a razor sharp blade every time?

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array technomonster's Avatar
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    depends on the steel and what the knife is used for. that and the size/shape of the blade

    cheap pocket knife just a few minutes.

    well maintained 10" chef knife about 10 to 15.

    large blades over 12" about 20 to half hour.

    and some blades just can not be truly shaving sharp because of blade angle or grind, such as an ax or cleaver.

    any Scandinavian grind blade will take longer but it's worth it.

    or do you mean how long till i was proficient ? i'd say about a half year practicing weekly. some blades are harder then others to get right.

    i use only flat stone and never any gadgets.
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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    By 3rd grade I had it down pat.
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    Senior Member Array 031131's Avatar
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    Guess I have awhile to go then lol.

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    I start out with a Japanese water stone to get the initial edge then switch to medium and fine Colorado ceramic stones then finishing an a razor strop. From a 4 inch paring knife to the 12 inch chef’s knife it takes me about 45 minutes to an hour to sharpen all five kitchen knives, pocket and other knives even quicker.

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    My stones are over 30 years old, back then they were less than $20 each.
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    Distinguished Member Array Wunderneun's Avatar
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    I'm spoiled. I use a Lasky sharpening system. Razor edge every time at 20°, 25°, and 30°.

    I'm going to be getting one of those semi-pro sharpeners using the three stage diamond wheel process soon.

    I'd like to get a pro sharpener but I don't have an extra $1500 laying around doing nothing.
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    Senior Member Array 031131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wunderneun View Post
    I'm spoiled. I use a Lasky sharpening system. Razor edge every time at 20°, 25°, and 30°.

    I'm going to be getting one of those semi-pro sharpeners using the three stage diamond wheel process soon.

    I'd like to get a pro sharpener but I don't have an extra $1500 laying around doing nothing.

    I have lasky too. There is just something fun about using stones though. Just starting out so I only have a fine diamond and Arkansas stone. I find the lasky doesn't like to hold my knives very well. Not to mention I'm going through screws like mad lol.
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    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    It takes a while to get proficient. Some knives are easier than others.

    Tip: Don't let your knife get dull. It is much easier to spend a few minutes touching the edge up as soon as it needs it then waiting until it is really dull and having to reset the bevel and start completely over.
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    I use one of those handle sharpener thingies(that is the correct name I swear!) for my basic pocket knife. I have to use it almost daily for cutting a lot of plastics and rope/string for work and it takes a beating. My Kabar and good kitchen knifes I have professionally sharpened.

    Only cuz I'm lazy. If I had to I could do it myself. One of the good skills I learned as a Boy Scout.
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    Senior Member Array zamboni's Avatar
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    I was raised on using a stone to sharpen all my knifes till I saw this thing similar to the Samurai Shark at a LGShow for $10. a couple weeks ago.

    The guy selling um took a plan o’l dull butter knife & put a razor sharp edge on it, then one on my pocket knife, and then he even put one on a plastic credit card which he sliced newspaper and a tomato with and I was sold!

    mcnrDBTLz_ODrBTzrzlD7qg.jpg

    I took it to our Scout’s troop meeting and took an old dull butter knife & put an edge on it that shaved hair off my arm, and then did the credit card trick & jaws dropped!

    Now everyone wants one, so we’re dropping the stone & there’s a LGShow in two weeks and we’re making it a troop field trip so I’m sure if the guy is there he’ll be selling several to our scouts and some of the parents want one too. And they will make great Christmas gifts too.

    Hey Jack it works … and it’s easier then messing with a stone! Though everyone needs too learn how to sharpen ah knife using ah stone because their more really available in the woods then that Shark thing-ee is.
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  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array technomonster's Avatar
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    there are tons of gadgets out there that will work on common blades but sometimes only a flat stone will do. for example a straight razor that is beyond stropping or a Scandinavian grind knife. a fine stone in the 5000 to 8000 grit range can make a truly fine razor edge without relying on micro fractures for "bite" which is often confused with sharpness. bit is good for some applications like a ripe tomato but it is not the same as a razor edge which will require fine polishing.

    you dont need to spend a fortune on natural stones. man made one will work, i have the same set for a good seven years now and i expect them to serve me for another ten.

    you can also use a thick pane of non tempered class and wet sand paper. tempered galss is always a little warped, find the "tin side" of the glass and put that side up. the side that appeas milky under UV light is the tin side, it is flatter then the "air side"

    i use mino sharp stones, the stones are over 10" http://www.amazon.com/MinoSharp-Medi.../dp/B0006A03UQ i have 220 1000 5000 and 8000 grit. about 30 to 70 each depending on grit, you can also get duel sided ones, but they cost more.

    i recommend a large stone what is made to use water and not oil. there are many other brands that cost less that could be good for learning.http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Profe...pd_sim_sbs_k_3 3000-6000 grit is more then fine enough unless you want to sharpen actual razors. 1000 for typical working knife and 200 for badly dulled and chipped knives.
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    I like this thread, at you Marine, @ the OP! IF Im reading your MOS correct! If not, please correct me.

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    Member Array GunTeacher's Avatar
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    My father taught me.

    A lot is in the angle and the feel. I've been doing it for 50 years so I've got it down now. I can even keep a pretty good edge on the kitchen knives with a ceramic rod.

    1. If really bad edge, use a mill bastd file to clear off the nicks and burrs.
    2. Use rough stone to get a rough edge working each side equally with circular or swiping motions as needed. I use clean oil on my stones. You can use water. Just don't do it dry.
    3. Move to a medium, then fine stone. By now your edge should start feeling sharp, but ragged.
    4. Next is the Arkansas stone for the fine edge. I've used the same one for probably 35 years, it's getting a bit worn but I think it will see me through.

    5. This is the biggie. After getting a good edge with the Ark Stone, I switch to a set of Craftsman ceramic rods, that I've also had over 30 years. I start with 10 swipes per side and count down by 1. 10,9,8... when I get to 3 I double up 3,3,3,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,1.

    6. Finish with a suede strop. I made mine again probably 30 years ago out of an old jacket. I cut about two feet of leather, set a grommet in both ends and tied a rope loop to the ends. One end of the loop goes over whatever is handy, a foot if nothing else. You hold the other end tight and strop the blade a few times to clean off any burrs.

    This gives a razor edge that is sharp enough to shave with.

    I use the Craftsman rods just because I've had them forever and they float my boat. I've got a set of Sypderco rods somewhere that I bought 20 years ago intending to use and never did.

    I also have a low speed wet wheel commercial knife and tool sharpening grinder. I use it for rougher edges, axes, machetes, hoes, whatever. It turns slow enough not to damage the temper.

    My other tricks. I clean my rods with a 3M scrubber and ajax, and I clean my stones with a toothbrush and warm soapy water. Keeps the grit from clogging them up. I don't know if this is the "proper" way, but it's worked for me for 50 years and my stones, two of which were my fathers are are probably 70+ years old are just fine. A bit worn down in the middle, but good as new grit wise.

    I have a nice collection of knives and switchblades.

    So what do I carry? A $5 Home Depot folding utility/box cutter. When the blade gets dull flick the little thingy open and stick a new razor in it and you are good to go!
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  15. #14
    VIP Member Array Phaedrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by technomonster View Post


    and some blades just can not be truly shaving sharp because of blade angle or grind, such as an ax or cleaver.
    You can't get an axe shaving sharp? Hahahaha! NOOB! Just teasin' you a bit. I got a new axe two years ago and did put an edge on it that you could shave your face with. Literally razor sharp! Cut wood real nice for about two swings. Oh, yeah...probably got the edge too thin.

    What I laughingly refer to as my "real job" is working as a chef. I moonlight as a pro sharpener when I have time. My specialty is Japanese kitchen knives but I do pretty much any kind of knife, sometimes axes. Not really set up for scissors. With J-knives I use Japanese water stones, natural and synthetic, but for most other stuff I use grinders. It would suck to do radical repairs (broken tips, huge chips, bolster reductions, etc) without powered gear.
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    Want a real challenge; I keep this critter razor sharp. Files and a carborundum stone do the trick.

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