Practical martial arts/self defense courses.

This is a discussion on Practical martial arts/self defense courses. within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Tai Chi there are plenty of instructional video's you can learn it from. Low impact, and great exercise. It makes the body more flexible without ...

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Thread: Practical martial arts/self defense courses.

  1. #31
    Member Array rmhz1979's Avatar
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    Tai Chi there are plenty of instructional video's you can learn it from. Low impact, and great exercise. It makes the body more flexible without the strain, great martial art. Did I mention also China's national exercise!
    "No free man shall ever be de-barred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain their right to keep and bear arms is as a last resort to protect themselves against tyranny in government." - Thomas Jefferson

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  3. #32
    VIP Member Array KenpoTex's Avatar
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    I'd recommend a good MMA school. You get a mix of different striking arts (mostly western boxing and Muay Thai) some clinch work, and some groundfighting/grappling. While there are some concerns about being too deeply immersed in the competitive mentality, I feel that with the proper mindset on the part of the student this isn't a major issue. One of the biggest advantages I see with MMA training is the level of intensity/resistance that you encounter. By training against a resisting opponent you are learning to use skills that will actually work. In contrast, it is an unfortunate fact that many "traditional" martial-arts schools don't provide this level of training and as a result, you're left practicing techniques of dubious value with someone who is really not trying to prevent you from succeeding.

    One of my favorite "martial" quotes is from Col. Rex Applegate: "Will this work so that I can use it instinctively in vital combat against an opponent who is determined to prevent me from doing so, and who is striving to eliminate me by fair means or foul?" This, to me, is the standard by which all of our training must be measured if it is to be useful. If a technique does not meet this standard you're better off finding something else to practice.

    After you have established a base, by all means find a system that will allow you to add some of the nastier skills to your toolbox (WWII Combatives, Krav Maga, FMA, Kenpo, etc.).

    just my $0.02
    "Being a predator isn't always comfortable but the only other option is to be prey. That is not an acceptable option." ~Phil Messina

    If you carry in Condition 3, you have two empty chambers. One in the weapon...the other between your ears.

    Matt K.

  4. #33
    Member Array FunkyColdMedina's Avatar
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    Talking Go to East Coast Martial Arts Store in Orlando on Hwy 50

    You are very near one of the best and diverse concentrations of Martial Arts schools in Florida. Go to East Coast Martial Arts Store in Orlando on Hwy 50 (Colonial Drive). Students and teachers from those schools go to that store frequently. You can get some great detail about those schools and arts, there. I've studied Karate, Aikido, Judo, Brazilian JuJitsu, and Tai Chi. They all have their positives. No one art (by itself) is perfect and fits all needs. However, couple the art with the right teacher and you have a better possiblity of getting what you are looking for.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruertar View Post
    I am looking for pointers to a good martial arts discipline to pick up and advice on where to learn it. I'm interested in a more practical system that doesn't rely on acrobatics and round houses.

    If anyone knows of a decent martial arts program near Orlando Florida, please let me know.

  5. #34
    New Member Array sdkaliman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jahwarrior72 View Post
    i studied jujutsu for many years (the real deal, not the brazilian stuff); it's practical for self defense. penjak silat, kali, escrima, western boxing, muay thai, and krav maga are all excellent choices. steer clear of "MMA" gyms; they train for ring fighting and point scoring, not self defense.
    Very true what you said about MMA gyms. To add to this, MMA gyms typically don't stress multiple opponents or weapons which is what you're going to be faced with on the street.

  6. #35
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
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    Did you ever find a good place to train out there? I just figured I'd echo everyone again and say to make sure you get a little bit of everything. Take the Krav-maga style classes, take the brazilian jujitsu or other grappling style. Just don't stick with one by itself.

    As an example of why not just going with Brazilian jujitsu by itself:
    From what I've seen (limited as most of my MA training has been mixed), BJ spends a large portion of the time and effort on the ground-fighting(ie wrestling/joint locks etc... from the ground).

    That's great stuff to know and extremely useful in the right setting, but if you're out in the street (ie on asphalt or concrete) all that rolling around on the ground and on your back is going to chew you up.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

  7. #36
    Distinguished Member Array Agave's Avatar
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    I am a student of Judo and Hapkido. I train MMA fighters in those arts. I would really avoid fighting an armed someone at all costs. In MCMAP (Marine Corps Martial Arts Program), we learn about fighting armed people. I'm not convinced that it works if a person is bent on using his knife or handgun; if he is bluffing, the techniques would work rather well.

    Judo is really good for a police officer taking an unarmed subject, but I'd stick to copper jacketed lead otherwise.
    The preceding post may contain sarcasm; it's just better that way. However, it is still intended with construction and with the Love of my L-rd Y'shua.

    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor, Tennessee Certified Instructor

  8. #37
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agave View Post
    I am a student of Judo and Hapkido. I train MMA fighters in those arts. I would really avoid fighting an armed someone at all costs. In MCMAP (Marine Corps Martial Arts Program), we learn about fighting armed people. I'm not convinced that it works if a person is bent on using his knife or handgun; if he is bluffing, the techniques would work rather well.

    Judo is really good for a police officer taking an unarmed subject, but I'd stick to copper jacketed lead otherwise.
    Hapkido was the first real MA training I ever had. I started it in gradeschool back in beginning of '95-'97 I think. I trained with Master John Thomas at the United States Karate Center in Reston, VA. If anyone in NoVA is looking into that style he's a good one to learn from. I don't know if he's still there or not.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

  9. #38
    Member Array uflnuceng's Avatar
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    I was lucky enough to have a nationally ranked Skotokan dojo at Drexel University, where I went for my undergrad. 5 years of training with one of the best teachers I have ever found. It changed me physically and spiritually. The most important part is the instructor. Sometimes they can get too hung up on dogma and protocol. Mine was usually very level headed... and was also a member of the NRA. During master camp in the summer he would take several of us and teach us how to shoot a gun. I also took Tai Chi, which depending on your mind set, is very effective in real life fights. A real martial art will take a lifetime of dedication and impact every aspect of your life, but is well worth the sacrifice if you find the right instructor that understands the "art" part of it more than the "martial".

    What my Shotokan Sensei taught me was the most valuable tool possible: Situational Awareness. 12 years later I am still always aware of my surroundings, contemplating how I would defend myself wherever I stand, be it with a gun, a knife, or my bare hands. Its almost second nature to me.

  10. #39
    VIP Member Array KenpoTex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uflnuceng View Post
    I was lucky enough to have a nationally ranked Skotokan dojo at Drexel University, where I went for my undergrad. 5 years of training with one of the best teachers I have ever found. It changed me physically and spiritually. The most important part is the instructor. Sometimes they can get too hung up on dogma and protocol. Mine was usually very level headed... and was also a member of the NRA. During master camp in the summer he would take several of us and teach us how to shoot a gun. I also took Tai Chi, which depending on your mind set, is very effective in real life fights. A real martial art will take a lifetime of dedication and impact every aspect of your life, but is well worth the sacrifice if you find the right instructor that understands the "art" part of it more than the "martial".
    What my Shotokan Sensei taught me was the most valuable tool possible: Situational Awareness. 12 years later I am still always aware of my surroundings, contemplating how I would defend myself wherever I stand, be it with a gun, a knife, or my bare hands. Its almost second nature to me.
    No offense but don't you have that backwards? In fact, the bolded portion seems to contradict the rest of your post.

    Most martial-artists are great when it comes to the art (tradition, protocal, fancy crap) but don't have a clue when it comes to the Martial (the stuff that will actually be effective in a "do or die" situation).
    "Being a predator isn't always comfortable but the only other option is to be prey. That is not an acceptable option." ~Phil Messina

    If you carry in Condition 3, you have two empty chambers. One in the weapon...the other between your ears.

    Matt K.

  11. #40
    Senior Member Array Natureboypkr's Avatar
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    I into martial arts myself, but from watching the news on the regular, I think if Im attacked, I more likely to get hit with a .45 round than a roundhouse kick. But I believe if you know with you are doing it could help.
    Mixed Martial Arts Record= 2-0.......Kyokushin Karate Record=5-0

    USMC.....helping enemies of America die for their countries since 1775

  12. #41
    Member Array Brian@ITC's Avatar
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    FACT: Not all martial arts are combat arts and are not suitable for self preservation.

    FACT: Not everything “American made” is a good thing. American’s TRY to make things better than what has been around for hundreds of years and has been combat proven. In other words, “Don’t fix what’s not broken”!

    FACT: Some fights will end up on the ground and you need to be prepared for that. But, to spend the majority of your time on the ground is foolish for survival purposes.

    FACT: You are unlikely to be attacked by someone who is a skilled “martial artist”.

    FACT: When you shoot someone it is unlikely they are going to fall down and die right there. What are YOU going to do when the attacker is still coming after you when you have shot them several times?

    FACT: Train hard, train often, and train realistically. With that formula you can be prepared for most situations.
    Brian K. LaMaster
    President, Innovative Tactical Concepts, LLC
    Instructor, Counter Force International
    http://www.right2defend.com
    http://www.modernwarriortalk.com

  13. #42
    VIP Member Array KenpoTex's Avatar
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    FACT: Not all martial arts are combat arts and are not suitable for self preservation.


    That just needs to be repeated
    "Being a predator isn't always comfortable but the only other option is to be prey. That is not an acceptable option." ~Phil Messina

    If you carry in Condition 3, you have two empty chambers. One in the weapon...the other between your ears.

    Matt K.

  14. #43
    Member Array CharlieMike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenpoTex View Post
    FACT: Not all martial arts are combat arts and are not suitable for self preservation.


    That just needs to be repeated
    Yes -- to sum up my original question: I am looking for a system that focuses more on the martial and less on the art.

  15. #44
    Member Array CharlieMike's Avatar
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    I still haven't found anything interesting by the way.

    I've sat in on a Jujitsu class near downtown Orlando. One of the first things they explained to me is the old, "90% of fights end up on the ground." Most of the class covered ground techniques. This is not what I'm looking for.

  16. #45
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    FACT: When you shoot someone it is unlikely they are going to fall down and die right there. What are YOU going to do when the attacker is still coming after you when you have shot them several times?

    Shoot them some more. I carry a highcap g17, g19 or S+W M+P.

    Really, if they've been shot, they've had to created a potentially lethal situation with a knife, gun, club, etc for me to start with them to begin with.

    If they are still coming with nothing in their hands [ they've dropped the weapon after being hit several times ]. I'm going to avoid them like the plague, they might have it, or some other communicable disease. I don't want them touching me.

    Brownie
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

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