What about EDCs that you've managed to hold onto for an amazing length of time?

This is a discussion on What about EDCs that you've managed to hold onto for an amazing length of time? within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This would also include knives that you've found after a long time missing. I have a Buck Gent that I got while I was in ...

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Thread: What about EDCs that you've managed to hold onto for an amazing length of time?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Post What about EDCs that you've managed to hold onto for an amazing length of time?

    This would also include knives that you've found after a long time missing.

    I have a Buck Gent that I got while I was in high school (around 1988 or so), but more importantly I have a Swiss-army-style knife with brown plastic grips and the Cub Scout symbol on it from when my brother got it when he was in the Webelos! The knife must date back to the late '60s or early '70s and is in great condition. He gave it to me when I myself was a kid in the late '70s. It's tucked away now.

    What relics from your past do you still have somewhere safe?

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    My A.G. Russell - one handed paramedic knife! I am amazed I haven't lost it yet. I've had it for about 20 years now.

    The damn thing is so friggon thin. One of my favorites too btw. ATS-34 fully serrated sheepsfoot blade. Handle is made out of a solid piece of stainless spring steel designed to be opened and closed with one hand.

    Oh, I've lost it several times over the years, even for a few months, but I always seem to find it again.

    Thank goodness, as it's no longer made in those spec's anymore. Now the blades are made of AUS-6 and AUS-8 instead of ATS-34 and I don't think he makes the fully serrated sheepsfoot design either. Just the combi-blade. And the cheaper ones have zytel handles instead of the stainless spring steel.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    I still have a couple of Case sheath knfes from the late 50's and my Buck pocket knife, also holster, from 1971.
    Les Baer 45
    Sig Man
    N.R.A. Patron Life Member
    M.C.R.G.O.

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    VIP Member Array raevan's Avatar
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    Pistol- 1911 with Remington Rand frame since 1967
    Knife- Kabar Trapper since 1962. Buck 110 lock back from 1964.

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    Hardly a true EDC - altho I did back in UK often have this strapped on - but I lived semi rural. Bought 1967 for about $35 equivalent and has been used and abused many times .... including chopping down small saplings for firewood!

    Not a stabbing blade of course but razor sharp slasher and - immense strength in that blade. Sheath is a homemade as original was crap. Still a very handy tool to have around.


    Chris - P95
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    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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    My Buck 110 purchased in 1972. 35 years old. A youngster compared to me....

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    Chris, that looks a whole lot like an early model Puma White Hunter! If so, it's probably worth a couple thousand today.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    Oops.... sheesh... I guess I could have your caption on the photo before I wrote that! Doh!
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Pictures are encouraged!


    P.S. Is that "White Hunter" really worth a couple thousand dollars?!

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    Chris, that looks a whole lot like an early model Puma White Hunter!
    Blade just says ''White Hunter" - and it shows its age a bit too in places .... hard to believe it could make that sorta money Mike
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  12. #11
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    Yes, the White Hunter is made by PUMA in Germany. The White Hunter is a very sought after and treasured model in their line-up. Still being made today with probably $300 retail for the new production ones if it has the stag handle. (I think they make one with a plastic handle for around $100 but not sure if it's called White Hunter on the plastic handle models.)

    Those made 30+ years ago are worth some $$.

    I have a friend of mine who got his in the 1960's when he made eagle scout in OA and turned down a $1,000 offer for it in 1983. If it wasn't a gift he got when he made eagle, he probably would have sold it.

    Last year I saw an $1800 price tag on one at a gun show made circa 1970.

    (Look for a little mark on the blade where it was diamond tested for hardness. I think it's near the handguard but it may be anywhere on the blade. You may need a magnifyer but you should see a distinct little knick on the blade from the diamond.)

    PUMA is one of the famous trade-marks that gave Solingen its name "City of Knives. " Founded in 1769, the Company's first rule was, and still is today, first class quality which is reflected in their hunting and sporting knives.

    Since Johann Wilhelm Lauterjung had the eldest trade-mark of PUMA works registered 225 years ago, the company has made the utmost quality a rule. The blade is the " heart" of the knife and most important for a first- class knife. According to the knife model and its purpose, PUMA processes several steels, chosen with regard to their flexibility and hardness, tested in assays and practice. PUMA processes hot-rolled steels as their structure is by far superior than the structure of cold-rolled steels. The blades are die-forged by hand with shape and concavity predetermined. Most important is the compression of the steel during the hot rolling process. This special process guarantees the high durability of the PUMA knife.

    Durability and cut of the knife depend on the hardness of the blade. The hardness of a blade is the resistance of steel against a penetrating device. To find out the hardness of a blade, a diamond is pressed into the steel with a determined load. The depth of penetration is Rockwell C, abbreviation HRC or RC. Ground blades and springs are hardened at temperatures reaching 850 - 1200 C. Quality control permanently examines the blades during the hardening process. All blades are examined after grinding. Blades below a hardness of 57 RC are consequently scrapped because of PUMA quality standards. Unique: You can prove this control, as the mark of the diamond can clearly be identified on each blade.

    Knife handles and scales as well as other necessary assembled parts are also subject to strict quality control. Many materials are natural products, as f.ex. horn or wood. As natural products always slightly differ from each other, the scales for each knife are carefully chosen to be as identical as possible with regard to colour, structure and veining. The riveting of the scales and of the individual parts is done by hand. Blades, springs and scales are assembled with steel, nickel-silver or brass pins. Assembled knives are roughly ground, i.e. all edges of the staghorn or wooden scales are adjusted to the shape of the knife. Next step is the final finish of knife body, scales, bolsters and spring back: the so called first-class finish, effected on leather and felt discs coated with fine emery till the final finish, polished or glazed is reached. Final grinding is done on a grinding belt with an especially fine grit. Final control examines the cut of the knife, its function and correct workmanship. Each worker has his/her special control no. and may be held responsible for any fault.

    Each PUMA knife is unique. Many knives have passed down from father to son and still render perfect service in decades of practice.
    Note: Puma knives, especially the "White Hunter" are often copied and imitated, so you may want to get an appraisal on it for true value.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    Interesting info Mike - my knife only says ''White Hunter" - looks like an etched imprint. Nothing says PUMA so chances are perhaps it isn't the real deal. Mind you the blade has been incredible over the years - takes and keeps a very fine edge.

    Mine thru use and admittedly some neglect at times when it stayed damp - has some less than perfect areas on the blade and not sure I can find any diamond ''nick'' that is readily identifiable. Not sure where or who could give a reliable ID on it.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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    Member Array ALWILLIAM's Avatar
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    Dont laugh These pics date from the early 1980s....I was 16 and this was some of my edc stuff.

    DONT FREAK ! The handcuffs were legit edc...I lied about my age(said I was 18) and worked for my towns security crowd control unit for large events.You were given a 2 hour training course ...issued handcuffs and a radio and let loose in a crowd of thousands of people who were high or drunk or both.

    I added a spring cosh and knuckles to the issue radio and cuffs(if caught with these extra items.. I would have been fired and maybe charged) I took the risk.

    The good old days.

    I still have the

    urban skinner push knife
    parker push knife
    guardfather










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    VIP Member Array raevan's Avatar
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    Puma White Hunters were carried by some Vietnam vets. If you have one of those in good shape and papers and photos to prove it they will bring premium price. Most won't bring more then $500 tops. They can be bought for less then $100 many places. It really depends on how old and if there is proof. They are still being made but some models of Puma are now made in China.
    If you have an old Puma and want to sell, don't count on getting a high price unless you find a collector who needs one real bad.

  16. #15
    Ex Member Array something's Avatar
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    I'm 26 years old so I'm not setting any records in this category but when I fish I carry my grandads Buck folder which is probably from the 60's.

    He got me the 110 when I turned 16 and I use that a lot too. It's 10 years old. I did break the tip off but I grinded another one.

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