Formal training ???

Formal training ???

This is a discussion on Formal training ??? within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; My understanding is that carrying a knife with no training on edged weapons can do more bad than good. I have very little experience on ...

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  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array jfl's Avatar
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    Formal training ???

    My understanding is that carrying a knife with no training on edged weapons can do more bad than good.

    I have very little experience on the subject and would like your opinions as well as the type of training you've received.

    Thanks for educating me
    The first rule of a gunfight: "Don't be there !"
    The second rule: "Bring enough gun"

    jfl
    (NRA Life Member/Instructor - GOA - IDPA - GSSF - ex-IHMSA)


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Anything that is carried for the purpose of defending yourself or increasing you chances of survival will be better with training. My personal feeling with edged weapons are that the whole "knife fighting" is over done. If you want to study edged weapons as a stand alone or part of a martial art then great. IMHO you are much more likely to have to defend against and edged weapon than ever use one. That was the reason for our Spontaneous Attack Survival for Edged Weapons. If you do need to use a knife for SD we use our Inverted Edge Tactics. Think of it as point shooting for knives. I see you are in FL, we just did a IET course in Miami on SUN.

  3. #3
    New Member Array predator95's Avatar
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    When i buy knives, i usually think of using it for emergency incidents such as cutting a seatbelt or freeing someone or something from something. For example, i know a guy who was calf roping and got the rope twisted around him. One end of the rope was tied to the saddle and the other was tied to the calf which was pulling. He was on the saddle with the rope rapped around him, and to make matters worse, the horse started backing up. He had his Case pocket knife and had to use both hands to open it and then the ,rope was dugg in to his skin so he had to cut himself to get to the rope. Bad situation.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Array Cthulhu's Avatar
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    Well, I'm an assistant FMA instructor, so we train bladed weapons constantly.

    My view is, if you're going to learn how to defend yourself against a blade, you need to learn it from someone who trains how to fight WITH a blade regularly.

    Would you learn defensive handgun techniques from someone who didn't know how to use a gun?

    The person training defenses against a weapon MUST know how to use that weapon; otherwise, they won't have a good enough understanding of what that weapon can actually do.

    -JT

  5. #5
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    Array QKShooter's Avatar
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    "My understanding is that carrying a knife with no training on edged weapons can do more bad than good.

    I have very little experience on the subject and would like your opinions as well as the type of training you've received.

    Thanks for educating me"


    Edged Weapons training is worthwhile and valuable.
    I certainly can envision scores of different close-in scenarios where good qualified defensive blade training would be worth Gold.

    That having been said I think that for a "rational thinking" alert person in good physical condition that is able to think clearly ~ having a knife available is still a much better option than not having one...since we all possess a natural inherent ability to lash out and fight defensively when fleeing a threat is not possible.

    Even if an untrained intended victim were to flail arms and hands defensively without any rhyme or reason they would probably be better served if one of those hands contained a cutting implement.
    Could that knife be forcibly taken from them and possibly used against them? Sure.

    But, the fate of the intended victim is already at the mercy of that attacker anyway.

    The available crap-shoot options are then to have a possible way to improve the circumstance or possibly make the situation worse.

    Why ever opt for a negative when you can have any possible positive?

    And Ditto mercop:
    "IMHO you are much more likely to have to defend against an edged weapon than ever use one."
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  6. #6
    New Member Array bowhazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by predator95 View Post
    When i buy knives, i usually think of using it for emergency incidents such as cutting a seatbelt or freeing someone or something from something. For example, i know a guy who was calf roping and got the rope twisted around him. One end of the rope was tied to the saddle and the other was tied to the calf which was pulling. He was on the saddle with the rope rapped around him, and to make matters worse, the horse started backing up. He had his Case pocket knife and had to use both hands to open it and then the ,rope was dugg in to his skin so he had to cut himself to get to the rope. Bad situation.
    You don't see many serious ropers without a serrated Spyderco or the like in their pocket. Pretty much standard gear these days.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    As someone who has cut some folks out of vehicles and a few swingers (hanging, suicide type) I suggest a plain edge, especially seatbelts, sawing back and forth into the victim is not a good thing.

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