Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts

This is a discussion on Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; i studied bujikan budo taijutsu for a little bit....

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Thread: Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts

  1. #151
    Member Array fox2102's Avatar
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    i studied bujikan budo taijutsu for a little bit.

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  3. #152
    Member Array pete00's Avatar
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    Paco Sorry for the delayed answer. Thx for the links. I will check out the krav shool you have mentioned. This IKFM school seems to be very intersting. And the price is ok.

  4. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    Forms have their place in that they teach footwork, transitions between techniques, some phenomenally effective techniques if dissolved and interpreted correctly (and most instructors have not done this), and discipline. Looking at them as the "end all, be all" of self-defense is ridiculous, short-sighted, and naive (which all too many of we Americans are guilty of).
    Agreed! The forms/no forms debate in martial arts is analogous to the eternal discussions about 9mm vs. .45, semi-auto vs. revolver, etc. It has been going on for centuries and probably will continue to go on for centuries.

    I think forms do have their place, but are just one part of overall martial arts training. A part that should no more be ignored than daily practice drawing your firearm from deep cover and dry-firing it (or snap-cap firing it, okay) should be ignored. (You all do that, right? You don't? What are you thinking? Start practicing for Pete's sake! And drop and give me twenty while you're at it!)

    Some people - certainly not just Americans, however - view forms - prearranged series of movements performed the same way every time - as window dressing, useless movements that have no practical application, etc. I respectfully disagree. Yes, Bruce Lee spoke out against doing forms in his Jeet Kune Do writings. Of course, it was after he himself spent hundreds, probably thousands of hours doing forms of various styles, after he had learned probably hundreds of different forms. Could mean they were "useless" for him; could also mean that after you get to a certain level their usefulness may be less or switches to a different focus or level. At some level those forms were part of his overall reflex set, his overall martial arts skill set.

    Forms do allow you a means of practicing consistently by yourself. If you practice, say, a Krav punch/knee strike combo over and over until you're blue in the face, on a target or just on the air, I hate to tell you but you're doing forms. That's one aspect of the benefit of doing forms, programming reflexes. Are some of the reflexes superfluous? Maybe. But there are other benefits.

    For me, I get to a point of the "runner's high" when doing forms - it's like a "moving meditation." Not everyone appreciates this, and that's okay!

    Like I said, it's just one part of overall martial arts training. You need some way to repetitively practice movements, including footwork, balance shifts, stance shifts etc. Otherwise the motions won't become reflexive, it's as simple as that.

    As far as firearms are concerned, practice drawing from deep cover (assuming that's how you carry) while moving to create distance. This is while focusing on the threat, without using your eyes to look where you're stepping, and without tripping over obstacles like curbs, focusing on your target, see the front sight if there's time, and (dry and live) fire repeatedly until the threat is gone. Then make yourself turn your head to look around you because you will be suffering from tunnel vision as well as hearing loss by this time, and are vulnerable to a wing man/tail gunner "associate" of the BG at this point. A good reflex to program at this time is to reload, because I guarantee you will have fired more rounds than you think.

    Practice it the same way, consistently enough to create the necessary reflexes, i.e., nerve pathways, muscle memory etc. Guess what? You're doing a kata, a poomse, a hyung, a form.
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  5. #154
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
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    I like forms, actually. It just drove me crazy when my Kempo sensei would give us three forms we didn't know in a row. Want to make sure that nothing gets dissolved in a two hour lesson? Just take 60+ complex movements, shake and stir them in rapid succession, and ask them if they've been practicing them about 3-4 months later. Umm...no?

  6. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    I like forms, actually. It just drove me crazy when my Kempo sensei would give us three forms we didn't know in a row. Want to make sure that nothing gets dissolved in a two hour lesson? Just take 60+ complex movements, shake and stir them in rapid succession, and ask them if they've been practicing them about 3-4 months later. Umm...no?
    Well, that's a bad instructor. That's how an instructor acts when a student has a prepaid contract and the instructor doesn't care if the student comes back, or learns anything.
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  7. #156
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    i did not start my MA training until i was 50. it took 5 years to learn juko ryu jujutsu, or stand up jujutsu japanese style. it made me get in shape fast. lots of throwing, falling, and lots of sore joints. i think learning to fall properly is something everyone should learn. it saved my life two times. not because of a fight, but caused by falling on ice.

    i studied this art because of the instructor. he made the difference. at 55 i earned my black belt. i have been teaching small classes for about 7 years. i am now teaching two of my grandchildren both MA's and how to shoot. i am a n.r.a. instructor for 11 years in pistol, and PP.

    i never leave the house with out my cold steel 5" folder in my pocket. i love cold steel knives. one of my favorite is my cold steel master tanto. of course i also carry something a little more powerful then the knife.


    i have been on this site for less then a week. i have enjoyed all the information i have read. everyone seems to be extra nice. not all sites are like that. thanks

  8. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockindon View Post
    i did not start my MA training until i was 50.
    That's awesome. I like hearing those kinds of stories. If I had a nickel for every time I've heard, "Martial arts? Are you nuts? I'm too old!" I'd have, well, a lot of nickels. I have a student now who started training about 4 months ago at the age of 55. Sure, he's stiff and inflexible, though he is at least somewhat athletic, with a decent weight/height ratio due to playing baseball avidly. I don't care if he can throw a hook kick to the temple or not; if he can do it to the knee with good form that's plenty good enough, especially for street applications. We have a lady in our association who is 72 and is a 2nd degree black belt, started her training 10 years ago. You are never too old.

    i think learning to fall properly is something everyone should learn.
    I agree. Even though we are primarily a stand-up striking style (American Tae Kwon Do), we start ground training, especially breakfalls and rolls, pretty much from day 1.

    i studied this art because of the instructor. he made the difference.
    This is what I tell everybody. I don't care what style you're in - it's the instructor. All of the styles are very similar at the higher levels, say, beyond 3rd or 4th degree black belt, anyway. Striking, grappling, whatever. For the most part there is nothing new under the sun as far as martial arts is concerned. MMA? Not new. Karate founder Gichin Funakoshi was a mixed martial artist, back before WWII. As was Aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba, also back before WWII. Just two examples. It's all about the instructor - the thing to be careful of is to make sure you're not joining a personality cult. Unfortunately this happens a lot in MA, and it may not be readily apparent until you've been in a style for a year or more.

    i have been on this site for less then a week. i have enjoyed all the information i have read. everyone seems to be extra nice. not all sites are like that. thanks
    Welcome!
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

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