Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts - Page 6

Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts

This is a discussion on Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; =Monkeytown I also carry myself in such a manner as to not draw a lot of attention from trouble makers (i.e. I am not a ...

Page 6 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2345678910 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 157
  1. #76
    Member Array ItsMyRight2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SouthFlorida
    Posts
    315
    =Monkeytown
    I also carry myself in such a manner as to not draw a lot of attention from trouble makers (i.e. I am not a loud mouth, braggard, smart a$$, etc.).

    MT
    This reminds me of a great book called "The art of fighting without fighting"

    The book explains what trouble makers look for in victims and gives tips on mannerisms to avoid and stop violent situations without fighting. Basically punking out the bully or bad guy in very interesting ways. Its a great read.


  2. #77
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,663
    Quote Originally Posted by ItsMyRight2 View Post
    This reminds me of a great book called "The art of fighting without fighting"

    The book explains what trouble makers look for in victims and gives tips on mannerisms to avoid and stop violent situations without fighting. Basically punking out the bully or bad guy in very interesting ways. Its a great read.
    Just checked at Amazon-- its got 5 stars and only costs about 9 bucks. Same author also wrote "The art of fighting." Think I'll order the pair. The price is right.

  3. #78
    Member Array AllAbtSlfDef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    398
    I have not read the entire thread but have bounced around a bit. I study and teach Aikido and Japanese Jujitsu and Kyusho (pressure points) . I have experience in Judo, Kickboxing, Kali/Escrima, A well rounded art with roots in TKD/Wing Chun/Isshin Ryu/Kali and my father is ex Spec Ops from the 60's. I have exposure in alot of areas and this is what I find,


    The best techniques to use in a fight are the ones that work for you. The ones you train and feel comfortable with. If you try to plan what you are going to do you will probably get hurt. BADLY!! I fight way different than any of my students and instructors. I agree with the blending of MA and Weapon skills. I also agree that you should have training at different ranges of confrontation.

    aikido is great for blending with an attack and disgarding it passively, (it is passive for the person doing technique, deffinately not the one being thrown) then an in close situation my call for some nastiness of jujitsu(we call it our house of pain) ground work may be a mix of what you do standing up just on the ground. No reason you can't punch kick elbow knee and lock from the ground.

    I believe in getting the job done as quickly as possible. If you are confronted with a knife and you have a gun, well, just remember BG's fam won't miss you, yours will. sorry to ramble but this is a soap box topic for me.

    check us out. look for an updated site and links later

    The Dojo - A Martial Arts Training Facility
    "Put on the whole armor of God..."

  4. #79
    Member Array Hotbrass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Far Far away
    Posts
    456
    I studies Goju-ri karate, and kungfu for a few years. If someone has a knife-RUN.
    Keep your powder dry

  5. #80
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,663

    Age, health and MAs

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebe View Post
    I just started Krav Maga.

    My school teaches armed and empty hand skills. It is also an over-the-top intense workout.

    My mom was interested in it, but she's in her late 60's. I'm afraid 30 seconds of KM warmup would kill her, let alone a full class.
    FWIW, I'm almost 67 and have an incurable health problem which is going to kill me in a few years--I think 4-5. Meanwhile, I plan to be around and active until the doctors say no.

    I'd say that if your mom's heart and blood pressure are reasonably O.K., she can find instruction which will get tailored to her needs.

    A few years back I started out with Modern Arnis. Very interesting and very intricate, but after 18 months of lessons I realized I wouldn't likely live long enough to develop real skill. It was fascinating, but not meeting my needs.

    Presently I am working one on one with a young man who primarily teaches Krav, but also knows some Modern Arnis and components of other arts. He has been able to tailor 1 hr lessons, taken 2 or 3 x per week to MY needs and my capabilities.

    Yes, I come home from class exhausted and beat, but I've punched, kicked, elbowed, thrown, choked, gouged, disarmed, tossed, and practiced choreographed scenarios where I respond to "surprise" situations as best they can be set up in a classroom. (Amazingly, even when you know it is coming, it can still be a surprise and a stun.)

    Whether or not your mom can get into Krav and related instruction is a function of her overall health--especially cardiac health and joint health-- and her willingness to work on something worthwhile and also quite entertaining.

    There are at some schools classes in TaiChi which may be more suited to your mom's situation--though there is a difference between doing the forms and "contact," which might not appropriate for her.

    Being realistic, I am well aware that these activities certainly are not appropriate for everyone in my age group--my wife for example-- and you should not push your mom to something which is not appropriate for her. I'm just saying, don't let age, as opposed to health, be the determinant.

  6. #81
    Member Array Hkchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    166
    The styles I've studied.

    Judo (As a young child and during college)
    Kenpo Jiu-jitsu (My "Style" for 17 years)
    Wrestling (Varsity all 4 years, highschool coach)
    TKD (In Korea)
    Krav-Maga (w/ IDF Soldier)
    Army combatives (Instructor)
    Gracie Jiu-jitsu

    My opininion is that you should be able to fight at all ranges. However, grappling/jiu-jitsu is the only style you can actually "practice" exactly as you would perform if attacked.

  7. #82
    Member Array fox2102's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    vestavia hills, AL
    Posts
    275
    I study bujinkan budo taijutsu.

    I haven't been studing long but it's considered a combat art. My sensai use to be a contracter for the department of defense training soldiers before they deployed.

    It focuses a lot on body manipulation and joint locks. It also trains in traditional, modern, hidden, and improvised weapons. Basically it's designed to end a fight and immoblize your attacker as soon as possible

  8. #83
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,067
    Quote Originally Posted by fox2102 View Post
    I study bujinkan budo taijutsu.

    I haven't been studing long but it's considered a combat art. My sensai use to be a contracter for the department of defense training soldiers before they deployed.

    It focuses a lot on body manipulation and joint locks. It also trains in traditional, modern, hidden, and improvised weapons. Basically it's designed to end a fight and immoblize your attacker as soon as possible
    Sounds well rounded and sound to me.- George

  9. #84
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,663

    The spectrum of martial arts

    Quote Originally Posted by Hkchris View Post
    The styles I've studied.

    Judo (As a young child and during college)
    Kenpo Jiu-jitsu (My "Style" for 17 years)
    Wrestling (Varsity all 4 years, highschool coach)
    TKD (In Korea)
    Krav-Maga (w/ IDF Soldier)
    Army combatives (Instructor)
    Gracie Jiu-jitsu

    My opininion is that you should be able to fight at all ranges. However, grappling/jiu-jitsu is the only style you can actually "practice" exactly as you would perform if attacked.
    Take a look at the long list of styles and systems above. It is far from exhaustive. For example not mentioned are Brazilian and Escrima. There are others too. Why so many, if there is one that is best? Or is there?

    A few years back I met a most interesting man, Tom Green, who studied martial arts both as a practitioner and as an anthropologist.

    His book Martial Arts in the Modern World — www.greenwood.com is a difficult read because it is primarily a scholarly work intended for anthropology students. However, what I gained from the book and from a couple of encounters with Tom was the understanding that all of the very many arts developed out of specific needs, opportunities, and events in human history. Each no doubt met the needs of the population where an art was developed. E.g., The Zulu warrior had a fighting art based on battles taking place between armies of spearmen and men with long poles, in open fields. (Tom gave me a brief lesson in using a long pole, and how dance with the long pole was a Zulu means of teaching a combat methodology.) Others needed to develop very stealthy techniques suitable for tightly enclosed spaces and back alleys. Still others have had to develop fighting methods suitable for the jail-house environment.

    Their ain't no such thing as "the best" martial art. These are tools that can be applied in specific circumstances--and nothing more.

    What I think many of us ( if not all) "struggle" with is the melding of hand to hand fighting methods with gun fighting. We want to limit the use of the gun to "The Gravest Extreme" and therefore look to other means of self-preservation-- the martial arts.

  10. #85
    Member Array jimbofox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by United93 View Post
    Sounds good. Sounds real good. I like the idea of developing a system around many different defensive tools.
    Kenpo is the best pure self-defense system there is, period. I am not saying that to smite other styles of martial arts, I'm saying it because I simply believe it to be the case. A martial art that was created 300 or 1000 years ago (like most forms of Karate and Gung Fu) simply aren't adequate in dealing with the world we live in today. Guns didn't exist back then, so it's not comparing apples to apples. The only other system I've ever seen that comes close is Krav Maga simply because it was invented to deal with people with guns, knives, w/e and most importantly it was (just like American Kenpo) created in the 20th century and is based on scientific principle, not "chi" or "spiritualism" or anything similar that has nothing to do with pure self defense IMO. I believe Master Parker said it best "Purity is when pure knuckles meet pure flesh." Smart man, highly educated, and above all he put science and philosophy over tradition and religion. Kenpo is tailored to the individual, not the other way around. I have the utmost respect for systems such as BJJ but I feel many people don't want to point out one very logical issue with the entire system--it only works when it's 1 on 1. If you take someone to the ground when he's got a friend or two with him, they are gonna stomp you into the ground, I don't care how good you are (or think you are) at wrestling or joint locks or anything else that simply doesn't matter when you are outnumbered. IMO, you go to the ground, you've already lost. Stay on your feet and put your opponent down. Just my $.02 everyone, hope it helps.

  11. #86
    Member Array Random's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Clayton NC
    Posts
    399
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    Their ain't no such thing as "the best" martial art. These are tools that can be applied in specific circumstances--and nothing more.
    The "best" martial art is the one that teaches you the underlying principles so that you can use whatever tools are available and necessary to accomplish the desired task of defending against an attack.

    That will differ greatly from person to person, school to school, and style to style.

    In my opinion, a good foundation in one "style", supplemented by both formal and informal study of others, is generally the most productive route. But again, it varies.

    BTW, Hopyard, thanks for the book info - I'm going to have to check it out!

  12. #87
    Member
    Array Quicksabre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Detroit, MI USA
    Posts
    446
    The core of the style I am in is Tae Kwon Do (a mix of ITF and ***).

    My wife and I both are 3rd degree black belts in this style, and due to test for 4th degree in 2010. Our kids (14 and 8) are still in the color belt ranks.

    We have been training in this style for more than 25 years, and run our own class out of a Metro Detroit community center, as part of our overall association of 5 clubs in this area.

    Our style has an emphasis on street defense rather than sport - while we do have a sporting aspect, it is not the main emphasis.

    The style was mixed martial arts before mixed martial arts was cool. We used to call it "eclectic" in the 80's when we started training.

    It combines stand-up striking - from Tae Kwon Do and Isshin Ryu karate (hands, feet, elbows, knees, head, etc.) with grappling, joint locks, takedowns and ground fighting from Aiki-jujitsu, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Judo and Aikido. Recently we have added elements of Krav Maga and Arnis (stick fighting).

    We allow students to train in "traditional" kobudo weapons, and we encourage black belts to supplement this with modern weapons training. Many, if not all, of the black belts in our association carry concealed handguns - including our 8th degree black belt grandmaster. In his words, "...it gives me options." Most of us carry knives as well.

    Once every 6 weeks or so we train with a guy who is an IPSC and 3-gun instructor - he has a range in the back of his metal shop. He's also a 7th degree black belt in TKD, and the training is very realistic and incorporates the firearms and knives into our unarmed curriculum.

    I look at it like the gun and knife are just steps in the force continuum that begins with my empty-hand skills.
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  13. #88
    Member
    Array Quicksabre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Detroit, MI USA
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Hkchris View Post
    My opininion is that you should be able to fight at all ranges. However, grappling/jiu-jitsu is the only style you can actually "practice" exactly as you would perform if attacked.
    I agree that you should be able to fight at all ranges, however I disagree with the rest of the statement. I mean, on the street you're going to use eye gouges, biting, skin ripping/tearing, hairgrab techniques, etc. aren't you? And you can't practice those in BJJ or any other style, striking or grappling, on a live opponent.

    Or think of a Judo (or BJJ) hip throw: in a practice session you're not going to drop your opponent on his head, like you would do on the street. This compares well to, say, a Tae Kwon Do side kick to the knee. Can't really practice it on a live person, making full contact, all you can do is simulate it as realistically as possible. You can also make sure that in your training you throw the kick with full extension, i.e., not "pulling" it, and practice it making contact on a hard surface like a training bag or wing chun dummy.

    Basically it doesn't matter what your style is, you can't really "practice" the deadly techniques with a live partner that you don't want to really hurt.
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  14. #89
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,663

    re quicksabre


    Basically it doesn't matter what your style is, you can't really "practice" the deadly techniques with a live partner that you don't want to really hurt.
    Yes, this is one of the real limitations I've noticed with MA. Yesterday I went through attempting to practice two moves, neither of which can be really practiced because one would gouge the eyes, so you end up pretending by putting the thumbs over the eye brows instead to keep the practice safe. The other method would snap the neck and permanently paralyze an opponent. There is no way to practice it with full speed or full force. It is dangerous enough going slowly.

    Protective clothes and gear can make it possible to get a realistic feel for punches and kicks, but you can't really practice dislocating a shoulder at full force and with full speed.

    And, the really bad BGs have already practiced the really bad stuff in jail.

  15. #90
    Member
    Array Quicksabre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Detroit, MI USA
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    Yes, this is one of the real limitations I've noticed with MA. Yesterday I went through attempting to practice two moves, neither of which can be really practiced because one would gouge the eyes, so you end up pretending by putting the thumbs over the eye brows instead to keep the practice safe. The other method would snap the neck and permanently paralyze an opponent. There is no way to practice it with full speed or full force. It is dangerous enough going slowly.
    Yeah it can be a problem. A good way to realistically simulate and practice such moves is on a BOB dummy. You can practice hitting/gouging the eyes, striking manipulating the neck/throat, etc. You probably know, but it's the Body Opponent Bag - a guy with a head, neck and torso, but conveniently, no arms! I've seen them new at sporting goods stores (Dunham's) for $250 or so. There's also a BOB-XL which has a longer torso, helpful for simulating groin kicks, and (thankfully) clad in simulated, tasteful, boxer's trunks!

    Protective clothes and gear can make it possible to get a realistic feel for punches and kicks, but you can't really practice dislocating a shoulder at full force and with full speed.
    Sadly, true, this side of a communist dictatorship and some political prisoners to practice on...

    The corollary for firearms training, of course, is that you can only practice shooting at paper targets, or in some cases, moving pendulum-type targets. Although I think I saw Sweeney in some magazine shooting at something that looked like the firearms version of the BOB dummy.

    And, the really bad BGs have already practiced the really bad stuff in jail.
    Yeah I saw a martial arts motivational poster somewhere once that showed a tattooed, convict-looking type of guy with the saying, "Did you work out today? HE did!"
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

Page 6 of 11 FirstFirst ... 2345678910 ... LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Finding a Martial Arts School
    By mercop in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: November 3rd, 2010, 08:30 AM
  2. Invited to martial arts event
    By AlexHassin in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 1st, 2010, 04:11 PM
  3. Martial Arts Training w/My Toddler Son in D/FW
    By McPatrickClan in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 21st, 2008, 07:52 AM
  4. Martial arts
    By Pro2A in forum Defensive Knives & Other Weapons
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: December 22nd, 2007, 08:01 AM
  5. Martial arts anyone??
    By AirMech74 in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: July 16th, 2007, 12:00 PM

Search tags for this page

10 unarmed martial arts

,

budo training clayton,nc

,

james jarrett martial arts

,

james jarrett usma

,
kyokushin classes in denver co
,
martial arts unarmed martial arts are obsolete bullshido
,

metro detroit aikido dojo

,

top 20 most best unarmed martial arts system

,

unarmed combat classes in metro detroit

,
unarmed combat martial arts
,
usma, james jarrett
,

why is standing the first thing taught in unarmed combat, martial arts and judo?

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors