Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts

This is a discussion on Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts within the Defensive Knives & Other Weapons forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hopyard Thx again for your feedback. Studying the law is a good idea. I have allready done that a bit and will continue my resarch. ...

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Thread: Unarmed Combat and Martial Arts

  1. #106
    Member Array pete00's Avatar
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    Hopyard Thx again for your feedback. Studying the law is a good idea. I have allready done that a bit and will continue my resarch. What I have found out so far that it would be legal to carry a small stick, or a knife with a fixed blade.

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  3. #107
    Member Array wormtown's Avatar
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    While I would hesitate to criticize any system, and as it has been pointed out it's about the fighter not the style, "Wing Tsun" is trademarked by Leung Ting, and is the closest wing Chun has to a McDojo. You are probably making a good choice staying away from that branch. The underlying message is that no matter the art, you need a good school and teacher.
    You should not have any special fondness for a particular weapon, or anything else, for that matter
    Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings

  4. #108
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    First, I believe that no matter what the Martial Art or combat-fighting system you study, you are learning something that complements self-defense using a firearm very nicely. Learning a fighting system teaches you confidence and helps increase situational awareness. You gain balance, poise, psychological toughness, greater physical strength and better overall health. Most of these systems will help you defend yourself in a real situation, and in those real situations you are better able to remain calm, cool and collected as a result of your training.

    I've studied Shoto-Kan, kickboxing, judo and Tae Kwon Do (eventually attaining a Black Belt in that). I've rarely had to use my training in real life - I once slipped someone's hold and they then backed off, realizing that I was very capable of doing more. I also have stood my ground and stared down people more than once, people who were bigger than I was; I exuded that much confidence.

    As Sun Tzu said, it's best if you can win without fighting. But I believe if you have to fight, have the mindset to win and be capable of winning quickly. As a committed Christian, I won't fight unless I have to, but I won't be a door-mat either.
    Last edited by Pinger; January 31st, 2010 at 10:27 AM. Reason: clarification
    The first rule of self-defense is to avoid the situation. The second rule is Train and Prepare.

  5. #109
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    Thanks for the motivation, everyone. I am not in position physically, financially, or with respect to available time to train officially, but I certainly CAN put up a car tire and start whacking it with my cane.

    And I actually mean that seriously: I'm quite impressed with what a 1.5" hickory dowel could do in trained hands, and I would like to become proficient with it.

    Hats off to all of you who devote yourselves to proper training. Wish I had kept up with my Judo I started in the early 60's (sent the 6th grade school bully to the ER with it, in fact).
    Recently updated website: http://www.damagedphotorepair.com

  6. #110
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    jujitsu being my favorite

    boxing: self defense/sport,akido:selfdense,jujitsu:selfdefense.marine corp training:self defense

  7. #111
    Member Array pete00's Avatar
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    In the meantime I have attentend on ju jutsu training and I like it. Next week I will check out the Krav Maga school, If like Krav Maga I will also practise it.

  8. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paymeister View Post
    And I actually mean that seriously: I'm quite impressed with what a 1.5" hickory dowel could do in trained hands, and I would like to become proficient with it.
    Bravo!

    There's a lot you can do with a cane...and if you can wield a cane, I'd bet there's a lot you can do with your hands, if not your feet.

    Have a look here for some good videos on "cane self defense": YouTube - cane self defense
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  9. #113
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    Flight Attendent gives unruly passenger beatdown

    Here is article about a passenger (said was stoned) acting out on a flight - tried
    to assualt a female crew member when grabbed and restrained by other female
    crew member

    Man who disrupted flight says he ate marijuana cookies

    Anyone know if Flight crew getting training?

  10. #114
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    Short term training

    I have studied Hakko Ryo Jujitsu (2nd Degree Black Belt), Korean Chung Moo Quan (2nd degree Black Belt), Tai Chi, Defensive Cane and feel confident I can use then, especially the Hakko Ryu when the situation doesn't call for drastic violence and have used it effectively to discourage violence against me. A combination of height (5' tall) and age (65) make the punching and kicking martial arts a bit too rigorous. I have studied and am much more confident in the use of Target Focus Training. The training is done in street clothes on unpadded surfaces including parking garages and paved parking lots. The emphases is on ignoring the "tools" used against you (knifes, guns, sticks, etc) and shutting down the attacker's "weapon" - his brain. It uses natural movements and use of full body weight strikes with an emphasis on focusing your strikes on specific targets with knowledge of how the person will react when struck at that particular point. I do have CCW but TFT gives me options.

  11. #115
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    Wink Awesome!

    Quote Originally Posted by TXhypno View Post
    I have studied Hakko Ryo Jujitsu (2nd Degree Black Belt), Korean Chung Moo Quan (2nd degree Black Belt), Tai Chi, Defensive Cane and feel confident I can use then, especially the Hakko Ryu when the situation doesn't call for drastic violence and have used it effectively to discourage violence against me. A combination of height (5' tall) and age (65) make the punching and kicking martial arts a bit too rigorous. I have studied and am much more confident in the use of Target Focus Training. The training is done in street clothes on unpadded surfaces including parking garages and paved parking lots. The emphases is on ignoring the "tools" used against you (knifes, guns, sticks, etc) and shutting down the attacker's "weapon" - his brain. It uses natural movements and use of full body weight strikes with an emphasis on focusing your strikes on specific targets with knowledge of how the person will react when struck at that particular point. I do have CCW but TFT gives me options.
    I'm no Black Belt, but I too, studied Hakko Ryu Jujuitsu and it has helped me several times in my career as a high school teacher in an inner city high school in the 4th largest school district in the nation. It has also helped me in my study of Aikido. I studied with Dennis Palumbo and Rusty Pollock (who is now deceased) in Miami, FL long ago. Palumbo was a guest instructor several times since I think he lived elsewhere. Welcome to the forum!
    Last edited by ExSoldier; February 6th, 2010 at 09:07 PM. Reason: Welcome new poster
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  12. #116
    Member Array Phoebe's Avatar
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    I've now been taking Krav Maga for 3.5 months or so.

    So with some time to evaluate it, I have mixed feelings.

    On one side, I believe I have some tactical advantages. Looking at me, no one would expect I could or would put up a fight.

    I can now throw a meaningful punch. (Didn't think I could ever do anything that would hurt anyone with my hands.)

    I can kick like a mule. I can throw some damaging knees and elbows and have strategies to do weapons takeaways, deal with chokes, etc.

    Most of all, I've learned that I can do violence to another being if that other person is trying to hurt me.

    That lesson could serve me well with or without weapons. I had no idea that I really was capable of aggression or violence.

    But sometimes I hate going to class. I have a shoulder injury from a few years back that gets aggravated by KM. I'm often frustrated with myself, scared of being hit, and hate being pushed so hard.

    I'm under a year's contract, so I'm not about to quit. But if I weren't under contract, I don't know if I could continue to push through.

    But like medicine, I suppose it's good for me.

    As for combining guns and H2H, my school is planning some kind of simmunition/h2h class in the near future.

    But even outside of that formalized training, to me, it naturally fits together.

    I am curious about American Kempo, but suspect that any hard, fighting MA will tear me up just as bad as KM does.

  13. #117
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    re: Phoebe

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebe View Post
    I've now been taking Krav Maga for 3.5 months or so.

    So with some time to evaluate it, I have mixed feelings.

    That lesson could serve me well with or without weapons. I had no idea that I really was capable of aggression or violence.

    But sometimes I hate going to class. I have a shoulder injury from a few years back that gets aggravated by KM. I'm often frustrated with myself, scared of being hit, and hate being pushed so hard.

    I'm under a year's contract, so I'm not about to quit..
    I don't have a good answer for the contract issue, but your instructor should find a way to tailor your training to your limitations. Have you spoken with him/her about that issue?

    As for shoulder injuries, you do need to be careful to not make them worse. I once had one "lock up." I injured my shoulder reaching for something in the back of the truck, ignored the pain and discomfort, and 6-8 weeks later suddenly couldn't move my arm at all. It took months of physical therapy to regain full use of the arm. No fun. Don't go there.

  14. #118
    Member Array Phoebe's Avatar
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    Hopyard, I avoid pushups and sprawling. But short of tying one hand behind my back, I don't know how to entirely avoid aggravating my shoulder.

    I'm not even sure what is aggravating it, though today a side hammer fist seemed to do it. But I suspect all of the punches are aggravating.

    What's sad is that after 6 months of lifting weights, my shoulder had been feeling much better. But that was before I started Krav.

    The instructors do know that I have shoulder problems, but no one, including me, knows what I should be avoiding.

  15. #119
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
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    First off, good schools don't require contracts. Full Stop. Let this be a lesson to all of you who read this post. If a school makes you sign a contract to continue to take the class, just walk away. I've been to a few schools that gave the best classes ever when newbies showed up and once you signed on the dotted line it was back to lousy as usual.

    As for the shoulder thing, I would work out on your own when you're feeling Ok. Do your punches and see what happens in a day or two. If you're Ok, then add something else. Shoulder injuries tend very much to not enjoy getting cranked on. Things like being armbarred into a forward faceplant (not that the uber-nice guys in Krav Maga would ever think to do such things) before a shoulder lock, outward wrist locks to takedowns, or other movements that rotate the joint to the limits while forcing you off balance. Also, be sure that your partners know (and respect!) that you're injured or you will have this nagging issue for years to come as you continuously get it almost better and then reinjure it.

  16. #120
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    re: Phoebe

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebe View Post
    Hopyard, I avoid pushups and sprawling. But short of tying one hand behind my back, I don't know how to entirely avoid aggravating my shoulder.

    I'm not even sure what is aggravating it, though today a side hammer fist seemed to do it. But I suspect all of the punches are aggravating.

    What's sad is that after 6 months of lifting weights, my shoulder had been feeling much better. But that was before I started Krav.

    The instructors do know that I have shoulder problems, but no one, including me, knows what I should be avoiding.
    What finally fixed my shoulder after months of physical therapy, which helped but didn't get me the whole way to being whole again, was one particular machine at the gym. It was a device for doing assisted pull ups. Properly adjusted for my needs, I found that as I gradually did more and more pull ups with less and less assist-- and especially if I just hung there and stretched--the shoulder healed.

    Now, I don't recommend trying that because it might just be the one thing that would make your shoulder worse. If possible see an orthopedic doc who specializes in sports medicine and rehabilitation.

    As for the Krav, you could try tying that arm for a few sessions and learn how to defend with one arm, as you would if you were injured at the start of a fight. That way you wouldn't be breaking your contract and you would still make progress with the Krav. Tying that arm up and not using it during the Krav lessons still leaves you with one arm and two legs. You can still punch, kick, block, apply wrist locks, wrap up, elbow, manage to apply some forms of arm bar, and accomplish some throws. Believe it or not you can do a mobility throw with one hand. Turn the injury to an asset. Make your instructor teach you how to continue a fight after getting hurt.

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