Sniper Rifles in the Movies...

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Thread: Sniper Rifles in the Movies...

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Sniper Rifles in the Movies...

    In the movies, we often see a man involved in a covert action that finds a roof top or abandoned room in a tall building where he then sets up his rig. He's usually carrying some sort of case that looks like anything but a rifle case. From here, he opens the case and reveals a hi-tech and hi-calibre deadly sniper rifle.

    The part that always places suspicion in my mind is not that you could find a sniping location in a busy city or even that you could disguise a sniper rifle so as to go unnoticed. The part that I have doubts about is how the sniper assembles everything. I don't doubt that you could assemble a full rifle in a couple of minutes but what about mounting a scope in a fashion where it maintains its accuracy?

    I was watching a movie the other day (I think it was the Clint Eastwood movie where he protects the President) and the sniper snaps his scope on like you would do in a Lego kit. It just seems to me that if you were putting your scope on and taking it off in a manner like they show in the movies then you would have to be changing scope adjustments. I mean, you would have to put that scope on within a nano-inch inorder to keep the set-up, wouldn't you?

    I don't know anything about this kind of stuff, so I'm asking.

    Are there professional set-ups that allow a scope to be removed and reassembled by snapping it in or out like we see in the movies? Are there scopes that you can mount in a matter of a few seconds and the scope has as much accuracy as it did when you were setting it up at the range? As much accuracy as it did when you set it up with a mount?

    This looks like Hollywood magic to me. This looks like the thing that urban legends are made of and not something we see in real life.

    I'll be curious to see your responses.

    Thanks in advance.

    DCG

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    Senior Member Array Tyler11B's Avatar
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    look up the Larue QD Mounts. I have one on a non magnified Aimpoint T1 and I can take it off and on with out losing zero where it is on a supported base. so it is possible, but most long range shooters will adjust their optics for almost every shot fired in an active scenario
    Last edited by Tyler11B; May 24th, 2011 at 05:26 AM.
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    Yes, there are set ups that allow that. And yes, getting a tactical shooter set up unnoticed in an urban setting is a fairly commen thing. It doesnt happen like in the movies but it does happen everyday many times over across the nation.
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    Yup, I'll second the Larue Tactical QD mounts as ones being able to do it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler11B View Post
    look up the Larue QD Mounts. I have one on a non magnified Aimpoint T1 and I can take it off and on with out losing zero where it is on a supported base. so it is possible, but most long range shooters will adjust their optics for almost every shot fired in an active scenario
    But they are making adjustments from a known "Zero point" whether it is mechanical zero or the last known adjustment. Would even a high quality QD mount maintain the kind of precise placement needed to make the the real long range work as easy as it depicted in the movies?

    I am not a long range shooter and am not trying to imply that I could make these shots myself.
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    Distinguished Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    You know, I have been wondering this very same thing for a long while now. Especially after reading here yesterday that it can be done accurately enough for a red dot on a tactical rifle... something to that effect. That statement does not touch on the accuracy needed in a sniper's rifle.
    When I purchased my optics for my AR at the LGS I asked the owner about taking them off and retaining zero and he said no problem, just put them back in the same position, but the sniper rifles we see in the movies, which I'll *assume* try to parallel reality somewhat, do not use picatinny rails. Most often we see scopes attached to the tops of rifles in a twisting motion to lock them and the rifles look pretty much like hunting rifles when assembled. I've always wondered the same thing about this.

    And are you sure about the movie? The movie that comes to my mind is Absolute Power, where Clint plays a thief who robs a house and witnesses the president killing the owner's cheating wife. Two snipers then try to shoot Clint later in the movie and both set up their rifles this way... only to be thwarted by a timely passing of some reflective glass, lol. In the Line of Fire, Clint is after an assassin who uses that homemade plastic double-barrel pistol.

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    I think the op is talking about "In the Line of Fire " where Clint is playing an old secret service agent. Good flick!

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    Distinguished Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edlex View Post
    I think the op is talking about "In the Line of Fire " where Clint is playing an old secret service agent. Good flick!
    I just can't place any sniper action in that movie, aside from the B&W Kennedy footage with Clint running beside the car. Did Malkovic try to shoot the president when Clint was running all out of breath beside the current president's car, too? I'm only on my second cup and can't remember.
    Either way, it's a good question about these movie sniper rifles.

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    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAcanis View Post

    And are you sure about the movie? The movie that comes to my mind is Absolute Power, where Clint plays a thief who robs a house and witnesses the president killing the owner's cheating wife. Two snipers then try to shoot Clint later in the movie and both set up their rifles this way... only to be thwarted by a timely passing of some reflective glass, lol. In the Line of Fire, Clint is after an assassin who uses that homemade plastic double-barrel pistol.
    No, I'n not sure about the movie. I've seen both of those movies in the past few months so I have probably confused the two. "Absolute Power" sounds like the one I was thinking of when I wrote my post.

    I'm remembering a scene where the sniper snaps his scope on his assembled rifle, does a little twist and its ready to go.

    It just seems like something that is going to "snap" into place is going to have close enough tolerances that your scope is going to be dialed in like it was when you adjusted it on the range.

    I'm not familiar with the LaRue piece you guys are talking about so I'll take a look at that mounting system.

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    Distinguished Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    They've been playing the heck out of both of them lately... which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but they do start to blend together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PAcanis View Post
    You know, I have been wondering this very same thing for a long while now. Especially after reading here yesterday that it can be done accurately enough for a red dot on a tactical rifle... something to that effect. That statement does not touch on the accuracy needed in a sniper's rifle.
    When I purchased my optics for my AR at the LGS I asked the owner about taking them off and retaining zero and he said no problem, just put them back in the same position, but the sniper rifles we see in the movies, which I'll *assume* try to parallel reality somewhat, do not use picatinny rails. Most often we see scopes attached to the tops of rifles in a twisting motion to lock them and the rifles look pretty much like hunting rifles when assembled. I've always wondered the same thing about this.

    And are you sure about the movie? The movie that comes to my mind is Absolute Power, where Clint plays a thief who robs a house and witnesses the president killing the owner's cheating wife. Two snipers then try to shoot Clint later in the movie and both set up their rifles this way... only to be thwarted by a timely passing of some reflective glass, lol. In the Line of Fire, Clint is after an assassin who uses that homemade plastic double-barrel pistol.
    I concur that it is probably Absolute power, and not In the Line of Fire.

    Most modern sniper rifles have a rail on top, all the ones I have seen in the service have picatinny rails. And our DM's tested out whether their Leupolds and Larue QD mounts would hold a zero if they were taken off and put in the same place, and they would. Those are real scopes, not just red dots. Even our ACOG is a 4x zoom and not really a red dot, and the ones with those mounts can have the sight removed and put back on without losing zero.
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