How long can a direct gas inpingement system last before having to replace it?

This is a discussion on How long can a direct gas inpingement system last before having to replace it? within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; have been wondering about this......of course with proper cleaning and maintenance...

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Thread: How long can a direct gas inpingement system last before having to replace it?

  1. #1
    Member Array defensive007's Avatar
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    How long can a direct gas inpingement system last before having to replace it?

    have been wondering about this......of course with proper cleaning and maintenance
    I have yet to be attacked by a block of ballistic gelatin but.........

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I'm willing to bet unless you shoot seral hundred rounds a week you won't wear it out in your lifetime
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    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    What specifically are you talking about wearing out? The gas tube, the gas block, the gas port or the carrier key? You'll get some errosion in the gas port that opens it up depending on ammo and barrel length, but that's easily fixed with a heavier buffer. Your barrel should last you about 10,000 rounds before you start to notice any real loss in accuracy. The only thing I've seen go quick is the gas tube under heavy suppressed automatic fire, but that was done for a reason, not under normal conditions.

    I typically replace an upper every two years, but I'm also running two or three regularly.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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    Member Array defensive007's Avatar
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    well what i mean is general wear but of course with proper cleaning and maintenance
    I have yet to be attacked by a block of ballistic gelatin but.........

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    VIP Member Array Cuda66's Avatar
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    I'd say a pretty safe bet is that it'll outlast your barrel...that is, when your barrel gets shot out, it's time to look at replacing the whole shebang.
    There are no dangerous weapons; there are only dangerous men.--RAH

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    Well, I shot a M-16A2 in boot camp that was probably at least 15-20 years old, and had to of had tens of thousands through it, including a healthy amount of blanks. The armorers checked the barrel, but not the gas impingement system. And I didn't see one in 4 years of active duty, on weapons that saw more rounds in those 4 years than many civilian ones will see in their lifetime.

    So basically, I don't think it is worth worry about, as long as you treat your rifle okay.
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    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonconsiglio View Post
    What specifically are you talking about wearing out? The gas tube, the gas block, the gas port or the carrier key? You'll get some errosion in the gas port that opens it up depending on ammo and barrel length, but that's easily fixed with a heavier buffer. Your barrel should last you about 10,000 rounds before you start to notice any real loss in accuracy. The only thing I've seen go quick is the gas tube under heavy suppressed automatic fire, but that was done for a reason, not under normal conditions.

    I typically replace an upper every two years, but I'm also running two or three regularly.
    What do you do that could possibly wear out an upper in 2 years?

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    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodle View Post
    What do you do that could possibly wear out an upper in 2 years?
    I shoot quite a bit, attend a number of high round count classes a year, am an instructor and am not very easy on my guns. Now, I don't usually wear them completely out, but I shoot them to the point where accuracy opens up a bit more than I'd like and have had one with a heavily eroded gas port that was making the system a bit too violent and even an H3 was not enough when shooting suppressed. So, I generally replace the upper when I notice accuracy opening up to at least double of how it was when new.

    I generally shoot between 400 to 700 rounds a week at a minimum, sometimes quite a bit more depending on what I'm doing.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
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    ˙How does one clean the gas impingement system?
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    This is a "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" question.

    You could probably fire 100,000 rounds at a rate of one per minute a minute (which would take just 70 days if you did it continuously) and not wear out much more than gas rings and a couple of springs. At that relatively slow rate, things don't heat up to the point pf aggravating wear.

    Run 1000 rounds per 8-hour day through the gun and you might be lucky to still have a functioning gun at 25,000 rounds. (Both my extreme examples have the gun kept lubed.)

    Pat Rogers (EAG Tactical) runs test & evaluation guns in his 3-day carbine courses (typical round count is 1500). One of his Bravo Co carbines ("Filthy 14") went over 25K rounds without a cleaning before it regularly malfunctioned and needed service beyond just lubing.

    In a way, it's like cars. How long will a car last if you baby it, versus driving it like a berzerker boy-racer?
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    Quote Originally Posted by varob View Post
    ˙How does one clean the gas impingement system?
    This 'one' doesn't. Start throwing solvents and cleaning patches into the gas tube and you're more likely to create problems than prevent them. Brush the chamber, brush the crud off the locking lugs on the bolt, clean the bolt, and you're pretty much good to go. "White glove clean" isn't needed with the conventional AR.
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    Distinguished Member Array pirate's Avatar
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    A solution in need of a problem.......its a none issue. Shoot all you can or want and don't worry about this, there are plenty of real problems to worry about.
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    OP it's a decent question. The answer is that the next round's pressure will clean what the previous round left behind. you don't need to clean it at all.
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    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.

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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    I have a Colt AR15 A2 Sporter II that I've owned since the late 1980's. I've shot that I don't know how many times over the last 20+ years. But I do know I've not been easy on that rifle. I've never had to replace any parts on the rifle. So it's safe to say you can get a lifetime of service out of a quality AR unless you're super-super hard on it. Even then, a gas tube doesn't cost very much and it can be installed in minutes with a hammer and punch.
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    Senior Member Array Texag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    This is a "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" question.

    You could probably fire 100,000 rounds at a rate of one per minute a minute (which would take just 70 days if you did it continuously) and not wear out much more than gas rings and a couple of springs. At that relatively slow rate, things don't heat up to the point pf aggravating wear.

    Run 1000 rounds per 8-hour day through the gun and you might be lucky to still have a functioning gun at 25,000 rounds. (Both my extreme examples have the gun kept lubed.)

    Pat Rogers (EAG Tactical) runs test & evaluation guns in his 3-day carbine courses (typical round count is 1500). One of his Bravo Co carbines ("Filthy 14") went over 25K rounds without a cleaning before it regularly malfunctioned and needed service beyond just lubing.

    In a way, it's like cars. How long will a car last if you baby it, versus driving it like a berzerker boy-racer?
    To be fair, that gun cracked a bolt lug at ~16k and got a new bcg. It's currently around 50k on the original barrel.
    I collect ammo, not guns.

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