A question on tac lights and my shotguns

A question on tac lights and my shotguns

This is a discussion on A question on tac lights and my shotguns within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Recently, I purchased two, 700 lumens tac lights for my two defensive shotguns. Then it occurred to me that when I am on the range ...

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    A question on tac lights and my shotguns

    Recently, I purchased two, 700 lumens tac lights for my two defensive shotguns. Then it occurred to me that when I am on the range and going through a series of range tactics I can run through, easily, a couple boxes of shells with each gun. Granted, the tac lights are not iPhones but I am wondering the wisdom of keeping the lights attached considering the amount of shock they must absorb. I'm thinking a a dozen or so shots just to check their dependability.

    May be as plain as the nose on my face for this answer but I'm open to your input. Thanks!
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2


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    When just doing range work, I take the light off the shotgun to save wear and tear; Its probably not the best thing to do, but that is what I do. I do practice using the light when doing "dry" drills. I will shoot a few tubes full in low light both with and with out the light just to make sure things are the way they should be.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    VIP Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    I leave my light mounted. It is supposed to be able to withstand the rigors of being mounted to a 12 ga (recoil-wise), so unless I am doing something like crawling through mud or some other extreme training, the light stays mounted.

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    If it's a good light, it shouldn't matter.

    But if you've bought an off-brand - something that's not proven through years and round-count - I think the smart thing to do would be to pull it for the worst of the range-work, and reserve it only for either night/low-light practice and also to re-mount when back home.

    Modern LED-based flashlights are typically pretty stout, even the no-name imports. But given that it's going to be in a life-or-death role, I'd rather err on the safe side.

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    Who makes the light? A Surefire, for example, will withstand recoil from most weapon systems. Is the light - batteries and/or bulb (if not LED) - shock isolated? if so, there's no reason to ever take it off and I'd suggest employing it at the range now and then so you have some rhythm should you ever need it. 1/2 second flash to search and a 1 second flash to identify and fire. Do this, even if its just two or three times at the range and you'll be in decent shape.

    Actually, if you're concerned abut recoil affecting it, remove it completely, use it as a handheld if possible and replace it with one you're not concerned about. My thought is if you're concerned abut problems with it, it's the LAST thing I'd want on my gun in a low/no ought encounter. If there's even a 1% chance of recoil disabling my light, it has no place on my weapon. Not saying this is the case with you're since I don't even mow who makes it, just throwing it it there in general.

    700 lumens is A LOT for home defense! I love a bright light, but I actually switched from my 200 lumen scout light to my mini scout which is 120 lumens.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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    My TLR-1 stays on my Mossberg 100% of the time. It's good so far.

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    VIP Member Array 10thmtn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aznav View Post
    Recently, I purchased two, 700 lumens tac lights for my two defensive shotguns. Then it occurred to me that when I am on the range and going through a series of range tactics I can run through, easily, a couple boxes of shells with each gun. Granted, the tac lights are not iPhones but I am wondering the wisdom of keeping the lights attached considering the amount of shock they must absorb. I'm thinking a a dozen or so shots just to check their dependability.

    May be as plain as the nose on my face for this answer but I'm open to your input. Thanks!
    Have you run that light in your home? I'm thinking you might blind yourself with that much light reflecting off walls. 700 lumens is a LOT of light.

    Are you going to clear your home with your shotgun? Or just defend in place? If the latter, I'm not convinced you even need a light on it. In my home, there is enough light to see what needs to be seen in such a situation, and I have several flashlights in the bedroom that serves as our safe room.

    Just some thoughts.
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    That's an awfully bright light for a HD light. Hope ya don't have too many white walls in yer home.

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    That's a good pick-up, guys - I totally misread that, somehow: I went straight to "70" lumen, instead of 700, when I read it.

    I'm almost wondering if that isn't a typo by the OP.

    That's a heck of a lot of light to throw around, inside a home.....

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    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    A good weapon-grade light can handle the force thrown by a 12 ga. The one I'm using is rated at 330 lumens and is so bright that it damages vision if you look at it directly. It's almost a weapon in and of itself.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

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    Guide Gear 700 - Lumen Tactical Light, Matte Black, Shooting Accessories, Aimshot at Sportsman's Guide

    So, I mounted my light. Will try and get pics out. So far, somebody's pulling somebody's leg. If the other one I ordered is as subpar then I'm the fool. S.G. has a good reputation so I am surprised they'd put their name on this. However, let me give them one more try.
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Holy bright!!!!

    I did some searching on old CPF posts, and it looks like lights like that became pouplar about two years back or so (I got out of the hobby back in 2004 or so). Really powerful!!!!!! Awesome!

    Seriously, aznav, if you're going to use that indoors, have some practice sessions in your home with it, first. In the 90s, there was a push towards "the brighter, the better," but it was soon discovered that there can indeed be "too bright" when it comes to lighting up the night - particularly indoors, where back-scatter/glare off the walls as well as your normal household items (TV screen, mirrors, microwave door, windos, etc.) can serve to disorient and blind you just as much as your light can, to your intended target.

    Also, for some people, the bluish/colder hue of LEDs can exacerbate the glare issue, too (about 6-7 years ago, they started looking at bringing down the color-temperature of the LEDs, to get that "firelight/straw" hue of incandescents).

    I know from my shoot-house experiences that I prefer a light no brighter than about 80 to 100 lumen for indoor work - and that I prefer a warmer hue instead of colder.

    But if your intent is to use the shotgun for outdoor property/HD, then yes, generally speaking, the brighter the better.

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    "I know from my shoot-house experiences that I prefer a light no brighter than about 80 to 100 lumen for indoor work - and that I prefer a warmer hue instead of colder."

    Groan. I fear you may be right. I discovered that, duh, I had older batteries from another taclight in the 700. Woke up at three this morning to try it with the new batteries. Whoa! It did light up the night, bigtime! Now you have me wondering. The taclight I have been using gives a direct, almost pin point light with very little peripheral light which does creep me when I'm doing the ninja-practice thing in my home at night. Thoughts anyone?
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2

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    So here's the setup on one of my two self-defense shotguns. Rem 870. The pistol grip works fine in tight quarters and, yes, I have practiced with it enough to be comfortable and confident for getting on target.

    SG w:700:full.jpgSG with 700.JPG
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aznav View Post
    Groan. I fear you may be right. I discovered that, duh, I had older batteries from another taclight in the 700. Woke up at three this morning to try it with the new batteries. Whoa! It did light up the night, bigtime! Now you have me wondering. The taclight I have been using gives a direct, almost pin point light with very little peripheral light which does creep me when I'm doing the ninja-practice thing in my home at night. Thoughts anyone?
    Glad you're trying it out and practicing!!! That's something that you don't want to find out for the first time, when you wake up to that bump in the night!

    A light like that should have enough "spill" (light cast off from the central "hot-spot" - i.e. a laser has awful spill, whereas that incandescent light bulb in your desk lamp has great spill), particularly when it's limited to close indoor ranges, but I'm think that the center is so hot that it's causing your pupils to constrict more than they really should, which makes you take in less of the surroundings (to wit: this is a huge concern in automotive headlight design, too much light in the foreground actually hurts your night-time distance-vision).

    The first thought that pops into my head would be to have you somehow diffuse the light. But in thinking more about it, I'm not sure that would be a good thing to do, as that may cause you to actually silhouette yourself.

    I'm almost wondering if it wouldn't be more to your advantage to just get another light - something more suited to indoor use - and perhaps reserve this torch for outdoor use (either mounted on another long-gun or, alternatively, kept as a hand-held to supplement your pistol)?

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