A lesson learned...

A lesson learned...

This is a discussion on A lesson learned... within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I went to the range today to shoot a few firearms, including my Saiga 7.62. I left the Saiga for last. I load a 30-rd ...

Results 1 to 11 of 11
Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By HotGuns
  • 1 Post By pirate

Thread: A lesson learned...

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array boricua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    3,873

    A lesson learned...

    I went to the range today to shoot a few firearms, including my Saiga 7.62. I left the Saiga for last. I load a 30-rd mag with the usual corrosive/non-magnetic ammo (indoor range). I shoot the first round, but the next round does not chamber; first time this has ever happened. I clear the rifle and try again...same thing. I do it once again, but this time I smell something like burning fabric. My better judgement told me to stop and call it a day.

    I get home and start cleaning the Saiga. As I start to disassemble it, I see what appears to be some burnt lint in the trigger group chamber. I go..hmmm. The only thing that makes any sense to me is that I probably left a cleaning patch in the rifle the last time I cleaned it, but where is the rest? I stuck the cleaning rod with a wire brush tip in the gas tube and there is was...the rest of the burnt cleaning patch, which was plugging the gas tube.

    I think I will start counting the cleaning patches before and after I clean my guns, especially the Saiga, just like OR nurses count instruments and sponges before and after a procedure.
    Duty, Honor, Country...MEDIC!!!
    ¡Cuánto duele crecer, cuan hondo es el dolor de alzarse en puntillas y observar con temblores de angustia, esa cosa tremenda, que es la vida del hombre! - René Marqués


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Posts
    3,662
    When I do a cleaning session I use so many patches I couldn't count that high.
    "Was there no end to the conspiracy of irrational prejudice against Red Ryder and his peacemaker?"

    Revolvers, “more elegant weapons for a more civilized age.”

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    884
    Scary. At least the patch let some air flow through it. I would assume a solid plug would have created pressure issues.

  4. #4
    Senior Moderator
    Array HotGuns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    15,120
    WOW.



    A patch left in a gun is a serious recipe for disaster.You could have blown up the gun or at the very least bulged the barrel.

    If it had been anything but an AK it would have been much worse.

    I'm glad that thats all there was too it. When I clean a rifle I always give the bore a visual check just to be sure. I open the breech, point it up to the light and give it a check for obstructions.

    Great post. Hopefully someone will learn from it.
    oneshot and Superhouse 15 like this.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


    AR. CHL Instr. 07/02 FFL
    Like custom guns and stuff? Check this out...
    http://bobbailey1959.wordpress.com/

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wyoming, DE
    Posts
    11,252
    Happy it all turned out ok.!
    Hiram25
    You can educate ignorance, you can't fix stupid
    Retired DE Trooper, SA XD40 SC, S&W 2" Airweight
    dukalmighty & Pure Kustom Black Ops Pro "Trooper" Holsters, DE CCDW and LEOSA Permits, Vietnam Vet 68-69 Pleiku

  6. #6
    Member Array jrizzleP95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    177
    how do u like that saiga? im torn between saiga converted to ak or ar15 build. saiga obv cheaper but ar i think is better
    EDC=Ruger LCP
    Florida CWFL
    NRA Member

  7. #7
    Member Array Eaglebeak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Republic Of Texas
    Posts
    367
    Pretty much akin to the surgeon who's supposed to keep count of the tools, absorption wads, tubing, and cigarette butts placed inside you before having the assistant grunts suture you up in order to prevent "little problems" from popping up later from anything left behind

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array pirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Eastern NC / Pirate Country
    Posts
    1,820
    It could happen to the best of us believe me! When you reassembled the rifle after cleaning the previous time and inserted the gas piston into the gas tube, the gas piston likely had the patch jammed at the end of the gas tube blocking the gas port which caused the rifle not to cycle when fired. I don't think a kaboom event would happen in this case because the excess gases (gases not entering the gas tube driving the piston) would likely just pass out the barrel with the rest of the gases. The heat from the hot gas caused the patch to burn causing the smell.
    When I leave the home port:
    S&W 642 Airweight, Ruger SP 101, Colt Detective Spec., CZ RAMI, Kahr PM9, Kahr CW40, S&W Model 10-7, Glock 30, 19, and 26, Browning Hi Power, CZ82, Colt Commander, Dan Wesson PM7, Ruger LCP

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    Hmm, what do you use patches for?

    I only ask because when I clean my (piston) AR, all I do is pull the bolt, spray degreaser on it, wipe it down and lube it. Then, I run a Bore Snake down the barrel if necessary, stick the bolt back in, and it's good to go.

    I learned this method from an Army armorer who used this method on his M4 while deployed to Iraq three times and Afghanistan twice. (I only mention this because the environments of Iraq and Afghanistan are rather hard on firearms). Through (mostly) training and combat, he had approximately 10,000 rounds through his M4 with zero gun related malfunctions.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array pirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Eastern NC / Pirate Country
    Posts
    1,820
    The AK is a long stroke gas piston operated rifle as opposed to the AR (piston) being a short stroke piston rifle. More gas and carbon build up in the tube and on the piston in long stroke operated rifles. The piston in the AK is attached directly to the bolt carrier and the tube interior walls need to be cleaned occasionally to remove carbon buildup. The buildup of carbon in the tube and on the piston will not really effect reliability of the AK, but can attract moisture and lead to corrosion in the tube and on the piston over time. In the piston driven (short stroke) AR once the small piston itself has traveled 3/4", it expels any unused gas from the small vent in the bottom of the piston tube and much less gas and carbon build up than in a long stroke piston driven type weapon. I would still clean the tube, piston and op rod assembly every 1000 rounds or so even though the gases and carbon are vented and do not foul the tube/piston to the degree that they do in the long stroke piston operated AK.
    ErnieNWillis likes this.
    When I leave the home port:
    S&W 642 Airweight, Ruger SP 101, Colt Detective Spec., CZ RAMI, Kahr PM9, Kahr CW40, S&W Model 10-7, Glock 30, 19, and 26, Browning Hi Power, CZ82, Colt Commander, Dan Wesson PM7, Ruger LCP

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by pirate View Post
    The AK is a long stroke gas piston operated rifle as opposed to the AR (piston) being a short stroke piston rifle. More gas and carbon build up in the tube and on the piston in long stroke operated rifles. The piston in the AK is attached directly to the bolt carrier and the tube interior walls need to be cleaned occasionally to remove carbon buildup. The buildup of carbon in the tube and on the piston will not really effect reliability of the AK, but can attract moisture and lead to corrosion in the tube and on the piston over time. In the piston driven (short stroke) AR once the small piston itself has traveled 3/4", it expels any unused gas from the small vent in the bottom of the piston tube and much less gas and carbon build up than in a long stroke piston driven type weapon. I would still clean the tube, piston and op rod assembly every 1000 rounds or so even though the gases and carbon are vented and do not foul the tube/piston to the degree that they do in the long stroke piston operated AK.
    That I did not know, but I am not intimately familiar with AK's. Thanks for the info.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

ak gas piston sticking in gas tube
,
ak piston stick tube
,
ak piston sticks
,
ak47 burnt piston
,
ak47 gas tube piston stuck
,

burned ak gas piston

,
gas piston tube saiga rifle parts
,
how to clean saiga rifle gas block
,
saiga 7.62 piston rod
,

saiga 7.62 vented gas tube

,
saiga rifle gas rod piston
,
smith and wesson featherweight vented
Click on a term to search for related topics.