Remington 788

This is a discussion on Remington 788 within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; While not strictly a defensive rifle, I have an older Remmy 788 in .308. It was free, so my money is going to optics at ...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 34
Like Tree5Likes

Thread: Remington 788

  1. #1
    Member Array Cory1022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    214

    Remington 788

    While not strictly a defensive rifle, I have an older Remmy 788 in .308. It was free, so my money is going to optics at some point. Being a 70's gun, the stock finish was butt ugly; as there are limited options for aftermarket, I am sanding it down to refinish it, or just coat it ( I live next town over from one of the shops that does Cerakote). Does anyone have any experience with these? I found a couple of weak points by way of web search, my biggest hangup is price of extra magazines. With so many newer affordable rifles coming out (Ruger American, Savage Axis, Mossberg), I am wondering if I should just finish the stock and trade it in on something easier to get parts and mags for.

    I have a pre-64 Winchester 94 for the old iron itch.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member
    Array msgt/ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    7,136
    I have two, one in 223 and the other in 44MAG took me several years to find a spare mag for the 44MAG and it cost $100 as far as the 223 I think the last mag I bought for it was only $25 and I have seen the 308 mags in the $25-$35 price range. As for the stock the 788 series it was Remington’s cheap knock around general purpose rifle you could throw into the truck and not worry if it got a few scratches. Somewhat to Remington’s embarrassment the cheap little 788s were as accurate as or more so than their top of the line 700s.
    OldVet likes this.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

  4. #3
    Member Array Cory1022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    214
    So far, that's what I get out of research. I think Sportsman's Guide had mags cheapest.

  5. #4
    Member Array muddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    311
    Do you want to sell it?

  6. #5
    Member Array Cory1022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    214
    Leaning towards not, unless a bunch of guys convince me it's not worth my money to scope her. So far I'm hearing a bit of the 'outshoots a 700' here and from my local pundits. Let you know though, thanks.

  7. #6
    VIP Member
    Array msgt/ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    7,136
    My 223 caliber 788 with a 3x9 scope will consistently shoot 3/8-1/2 inch groups at 100 yards if I do my part. As far as refinishing the stock I did that to the 44MAG, when I removed the old finish I found the stock was a very light colored wood and needed to be stained before refinishing. Had I known then what I know now I would never have refinished it since it and the 30-30 versions are very collectable.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

  8. #7
    Member Array muddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    311
    I have a 788 with the 18 1/2 inch barrel that I got for Christmas 30 years ago from my Dad that has been a great shooter. Dad has the 308 version which I hope to some day buy off him. I have never had a problem with the weapon and both have been shot a fair amount. I know there better rifles out there but the 788 just hold a special place in my heart. I think what I find most appealing is they were made as a cheaper weapon that the working class could afford but they turned out to be diamonds in the ruff. Have fun with your 788.

  9. #8
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,944
    Never owned one personally but used to be in a gun club with some ol' boys who did go for the 788. One even collected one in all the chamberings. Those 788s made a great showing at our informal monthly "bench rest" matches too. A very respectable rifle, especially with a little trigger work.

    They had great barrels generally and were said to have the fastest lock time of any bolt action rifle ever made and bolt action rifles beat most other types of rifle actions. Pretty fast from trigger sear break to cartridge ignition. I always kind of wanted one or two to play with. They still aren't so expensive except for the uncommon calibers. Likely the main reason they were discontinued was because they were cutting into Remington 700 sales too much.

    I'd rather have a nice 788 than any of these (Ruger American, Savage Axis, Mossberg). I shudder to think of having to own any one of them and sure wouldn't trade off a Remington 788 for one.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  10. #9
    VIP Member
    Array msgt/ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    7,136
    The 44MAG and 30-30 are the most collectable, the 44MAG was made just one year and the 30-30 was made for two years.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

  11. #10
    Member Array Goldstar225's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    148
    As others have said, they have an excellent reputation for accuracy. My brother has been using one in .30-30 for about thirty five years to collect his venison each fall. A few years back he mentioned wanting another as a spare. Within a few weeks I spotted one for sale in the newspaper and let him know of it. He bought it the next day.

  12. #11
    Member Array Cory1022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    214
    I think I'll see how she stains up and run a few dozen round through her. I'll probably fall in love. I did see a seller on ebay that sells walnut stocks, too, unfinished.
    Thanks for all the feedback.

  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array hardluk1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    nc mountains
    Posts
    1,283
    Cory 1022 Pleased treat your 788 well. What caliber is yours. I bought mine in 1976 and it has allways been a great shooter with no real preference for one brand over any other. They even have good factory trigger than a bit of polishing well improve. The stock on mine a cheap wood stock but after 20 years of abuse I sanded in down put a light stain coat on it and tonue oiled it with several coats. Added a simms recoil pad. Looks better today than new. Like other said ,It was know to be a better shooter than the 700 remmys more time than not.
    If you find your is not accurate get soak kroil oil and soak the bore well and let set over night and start brushing and cleaning. maybe do that a times but other than an abused 22-250 or 243 the bore may be still in great shape. I just sent my old scope in for repair an stuck this redfeild on for a picture.
    bmcgilvray and Cory1022 like this.

  14. #13
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,944
    Quote Originally Posted by hardluk1 View Post
    Cory 1022 Pleased treat your 788 well. What caliber is yours. I bought mine in 1976 and it has allways been a great shooter with no real preference for one brand over any other. They even have good factory trigger than a bit of polishing well improve. The stock on mine a cheap wood stock but after 20 years of abuse I sanded in down put a light stain coat on it and tonue oiled it with several coats. Added a simms recoil pad. Looks better today than new. Like other said ,It was know to be a better shooter than the 700 remmys more time than not.
    If you find your is not accurate get soak kroil oil and soak the bore well and let set over night and start brushing and cleaning. maybe do that a times but other than an abused 22-250 or 243 the bore may be still in great shape. I just sent my old scope in for repair an stuck this redfeild on for a picture.
    What is that 788 chambered for?
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  15. #14
    Member Array Smoke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    61
    I have had a 788 in 22-250 for several years. I borrowed it from my cousin once when I needed a varmint gun for coyotes,I loved it's accuracy and tried to keep it longer, but he made me give it back. I caught him needing money for a payment a year or so later and bought from him as quick as I could. It'll put 3 shots in a group at 100 yards that can be covered by a dime, if I do my part. In the time I've had it several coyotes and many many ground hogs have been accounted for by this rifle. The stock is ugly as all get out as it was given a paint can camo job, but it shoots consistantly well for a "cheap" gun. This is one rifle that has a home here. It ain't pretty but it's got heart.
    "Come Watson, the game is afoot!"

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array hardluk1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    nc mountains
    Posts
    1,283
    I missed that yours is a .308 and that is what mine is too. Todays used prices on nice 788 are higher than many of the lower cost basic rifles out there today. Now that I can afford to buy a few I can't justify the asking prices at 400 to 450 around here when I paided around 85 dollars new back in '76.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

remington 788
,
remington 788 .223 for sale
,
remington 788 223
,
remington 788 223 for sale
,
remington 788 accuracy
,

remington 788 for sale

,
remington 788 price
,
remington 788 prices
,

remington 788 stock

,
remington 788 stocks
,
remington 788 value
,
remington 788 wood stock
Click on a term to search for related topics.