sniper type rifle?

This is a discussion on sniper type rifle? within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Here’s my “solutions” to your “problem”: REM 700 in .300WIN with Luepold 4.5-14X: REM 700 XCR “Tactical” in .223 with Luepold 6.5-20X MK4 Illuminated TMR ...

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  1. #46
    Senior Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Here’s my “solutions” to your “problem”:

    REM 700 in .300WIN with Luepold 4.5-14X:


    REM 700 XCR “Tactical” in .223 with Luepold 6.5-20X MK4 Illuminated TMR Reticle:


    I probably shoot the little .223 10 times as much as any centerfire rifle I own (16) simply because; it’s cheaper to load for. With 69 grain SMKs at just shy of 3000 FPS it holds well out to 500 yards even in wind. The 20” heavy fluted barrel doesn’t add too much weight, but it still would not be my choice to lug around all day.

    We were out at my place yesterday shooting from 100-500 yards. I was shooting the .300 (seldom) and the .223 (lots) and a friend of mine was shooting his Nosler 300 WSM sporter with Luepold 3-10X Scope with custom BDC dial. He had no problem lasing he distances and getting 1st round hits on a 18” x 9” 2/3rds IDPA steel silhouette. This was with a standard "deer rifle" and decent scope.

    IF you’re concerned about the rifle’s cost, I’d definitely shy away from anything larger than a .308. Even with reloading the bigger cartridges are expensive as they burn through quite a bit more powder, my .308 load burns almost twice as much as my .223 and you’ll only get about 100 rounds of .300Win from a pound of powder compared to 280 of .223.

    With a modern bolt action, decent scope, and known distances, LR shooting is all about wind, and that takes practice. Generally, the less expensive the ammo, the more practice you’ll be able to get in.

    Chuck
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  3. #47
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    With a modern bolt action, decent scope, and known distances, LR shooting is all about wind, and that takes practice. Generally, the less expensive the ammo, the more practice you’ll be able to get in.
    I completely agree.
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  4. #48
    Senior Member Array RubenZ's Avatar
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    For SHTF I wouldn't mess around with these Magnum and odd caliber rounds. Stick with something MILITARY like 2.23, .30-06, .308, 7.62x54 etc. etc. Heck your best bet would be an AR platform in M4 carbine length and a SPR length upper. Best of both worlds. The term sniper rifle really is so broad.
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  5. #49
    Member Array gigamortis's Avatar
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    Savage has the most accurate rifles for the money when it comes to bolt actions. They are even home gunsmith friendly. The bolt lugs are floating and self aligning, so no lapping is required like when accurizing the Rem 700s. The barrel nut concept is simply brilliant. A replacement barrel has its chamber fully cut, so you just screw a new barrel into the receiver to where your go/no-go headspace gauges tell you to stop. Then tighten the barrel nut and go zero it. Done. The Savage Accutrigger gives you a very decent trigger right out of the box. The trigger in my Savage 10-fp breaks right at 1lb-14oz.

    As for glass, I went with a fixed 10 power Super Sniper for $300 from Quality optics and accessories from Leupold, Bushnell, Burris, Nikon and more!. I know, the name sounds cheesy, but the reviews about turret repeatability and overall ruggedness are top notch. I like the simplicity of a fixed power, and when ranging a target with the mil-dot reticle, I don't have to stop to remember to turn the power down to the calibration power to range accurately. I use this scope to shoot F class matches at 600 and 800 yards, and I repeatedly place in the top 5 with my $1400 investment going up against the $3000 and up rigs so common in F class.
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  6. #50
    Senior Member Array NH_Esau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nedrgr21 View Post
    Can you outshoot today's deer rifle?
    Exactly.

    I wish I could say I could shoot to the point that the BOSS on my A-Bolt made a significant and practical difference. Theoretically, it's a 1,000 yard shooter, but if I'm honest, I know 300yds in field conditions is my limit for an ethical shot... significantly less in bad wind conditions. Of course, in a SHTF situation, I'm not really concerned about an "ethical" shot - one that puts the BG on the floor a long hike away is good enough for me, and even a hit far from COM with 150-200g of lead moving at 2200+fps will probably make it hard for the BG to cover the 300yds between us.

    As to whether I can see a practical reason for extreme long range shooting in a survival situation? Probably not a whole lot. Given the distance between my house and my tree-line, it makes more sense to have faster reload, greater capacity, and faster on-target time. If I've I've got that kind of range between me and the BG away from home, I'd probably be wiser to skedaddle.

    But it never hurts to be ready.

  7. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigamortis View Post
    Savage has the most accurate rifles for the money when it comes to bolt actions. They are even home gunsmith friendly. The bolt lugs are floating and self aligning, so no lapping is required like when accurizing the Rem 700s. The barrel nut concept is simply brilliant. A replacement barrel has its chamber fully cut, so you just screw a new barrel into the receiver to where your go/no-go headspace gauges tell you to stop. Then tighten the barrel nut and go zero it. Done. The Savage Accutrigger gives you a very decent trigger right out of the box. The trigger in my Savage 10-fp breaks right at 1lb-14oz.

    As for glass, I went with a fixed 10 power Super Sniper for $300 from Quality optics and accessories from Leupold, Bushnell, Burris, Nikon and more!. I know, the name sounds cheesy, but the reviews about turret repeatability and overall ruggedness are top notch. I like the simplicity of a fixed power, and when ranging a target with the mil-dot reticle, I don't have to stop to remember to turn the power down to the calibration power to range accurately. I use this scope to shoot F class matches at 600 and 800 yards, and I repeatedly place in the top 5 with my $1400 investment going up against the $3000 and up rigs so common in F class.
    This is a very informative post about Savage rifles......BUT the part in bold makes me laugh every time I hear it (or read it). Savage rifles cost just as much as the big boys now so they're really not the best bang for your buck anymore. They are a good shooting rifle and easy on the home gunsmith but they are no longer cheap.

    I still prefer Remington, but that's because I came up shooting them. The best bargain rifle for the money TODAY is either Stevens (basically the old savage line) or Howa (made on the same production line that turned out high end stuff like Weatherby and Browning rifles). Of the two I like Howa the best because they have a better finish.
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  8. #52
    Member Array mjblat's Avatar
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    Most hunting rifles today are accurate out of the box. In my experience, I would be better off spending the money on ammo and practice than a high-end rifle. Like I stated in a earlier post, my $350.00 Marlin 30-06 will outshoot me.

  9. #53
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    This is a very informative post about Savage rifles......BUT the part in bold makes me laugh every time I hear it (or read it). Savage rifles cost just as much as the big boys now so they're really not the best bang for your buck anymore. They are a good shooting rifle and easy on the home gunsmith but they are no longer cheap.

    I still prefer Remington, but that's because I came up shooting them. The best bargain rifle for the money TODAY is either Stevens (basically the old savage line) or Howa (made on the same production line that turned out high end stuff like Weatherby and Browning rifles). Of the two I like Howa the best because they have a better finish.
    Hey thanks for posting this, etc. I didn't know about Stevens being an old Savage line and I didn't know Howa comes off the same line as the old high-end stuff. I se Howa on a lot of the hunting shows but didn't know if they were any good or not. Are the Howas all foreign made or is it just their lower tier products?

  10. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by DefConGun View Post
    Hey thanks for posting this, etc. I didn't know about Stevens being an old Savage line and I didn't know Howa comes off the same line as the old high-end stuff. I se Howa on a lot of the hunting shows but didn't know if they were any good or not. Are the Howas all foreign made or is it just their lower tier products?
    They are made in Japan.
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    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.

  11. #55
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    Actually,most replacement barrels are short cut and need to be finish reamed. Only Savage barrels are full cut, the problem is that most aftermarket barrels far exceed Savage factory barrels in accuracy.

    I have redone several rifles that have never had a shot fired from them when they came to me. The shooters chunk the barrel, and use a premium barrel that results in a much better gun. For hunting purposes the Savage is fine, but you dont see them on the target lines much.
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  12. #56
    Member Array donp326's Avatar
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    I shoot LD competitions from time to time and no one I see uses an AR-10 past 600 yards. Bolt actions rule the roost past 600 yards. I shoot a Remington 700 SPS Varmit (308) With H-S Precision stock an external box magazine and a Vortex 6x24x50mm scope (Not pictured here). This gun with the right load will shoot 1000 yards at steel. I have done so with this rifle several times. I don't know what distance your going for but the 6.5 mm (260 Remington)are holding their own out to 1000 yards too. I have heard this many times that you can spend up to twice the value of you rifle on a good scope. Nightforce and Leopold seems to be the most popular but Vortex is coming into it's own now. For top line glass it's Schmit and Bender or US Optics. You might also visit the Snipers Hide web site and check out the forum to.


    Remington 700 resized2.jpg
    Last edited by donp326; July 9th, 2012 at 10:02 AM.
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  13. #57
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    My buddy got me into shooting long range. I started with a used 308 700 LTR that I picked up for $650 and found an older 3x10 luepold for another $400. Shot like a dream! The rifle was a little light for me to shoot 1000yds but it was possible. However, being the multipurpose guy I am, I traded it for a DPMS LR-308 w/20 in barrell. I transfered the scope and bipod over. Bought a new grip, trigger, and UBR stock. The last thing I need is the luepold delta point mounted on the side for close range. I believe I have the best of both worlds. The new configuration gives me a smaller package for CQB scenarios yet allows me to atleast snipe 800 yds, maybe 1000 with some work. The rifle is not light, but is well balanced. I have been working with the ammo reloads and so far shoots tacks at 300yds. Using the 223 doesn't give you the ability to do long range sniping but is great for CQB. The 308 gives you the long range sniping but doesn't allow for the CQB so easy. Going bigger than 308 just pushes you out of the happy medium for a multi use rifle. You may want to look at a 6.5/6.8 in the same package, that would be the happy medium between the 223/308

    As far as being in a position you may need that weapon, you never know, but I will be prepared

  14. #58
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Mosin-Nagant with a scope.
    If you can find an accurate one, the lower price could leave more cash on the table for better optics. This might be one of the ways to keep the whole package under $300-400, whereas a similar Rem700 could be a few hundred more by the time comparable optics are added.
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  15. #59
    VIP Member Array SpencerB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RevolvingMag View Post
    Mosin-Nagant with a scope.

    Dirt cheap rifle, cheap bulk ammo, really able to 'reach out and touch somebody'. Just add the cost of a good scope, and having a 'smith install it. And you're looking at maybe $1500 for everything? If you go really crazy with the scope.

    Maybe not the best, but it is bolt action, inexpensive, and a lot of fun to shoot. (Shot a friend's last summer, and been trying to convince my wife that I REALLY NEED one. But she doesn't believe me. )
    I love my Mosin-nagant. I am getting a scope installed when i return from deployment!

  16. #60
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    If you can find an accurate one, the lower price could leave more cash on the table for better optics. This might be one of the ways to keep the whole package under $300-400, whereas a similar Rem700 could be a few hundred more by the time comparable optics are added.
    With Mosins the trick is to slug the barrel and load proper diameter bullets. Most will improve greatly from good reloads. DR

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