useful range for red dot

useful range for red dot

This is a discussion on useful range for red dot within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; did a search, too many posts on just red dots, if this has been asked and answered , pls just re direct... I know there ...

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Thread: useful range for red dot

  1. #1
    Member Array boatman's Avatar
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    useful range for red dot

    did a search, too many posts on just red dots, if this has been asked and answered , pls just re direct...

    I know there is a difference between red dots and scopes, and how they are used. I have used a red dot to 50 yds ok. This is an inexpensive clone, $50, red/green, with 3 reticle choices, (those who know red dots have probably seen this model under a variety of names at shows). At 50 yds, I can hit a 3" water bottle/soda can every time (no big deal I know. I don't have a 100 yd range to try this at.)

    I am looking at a level up in red dots, up to $200, but am wondering how far a red dot can be used with a high degree of accuracy. I know the dot becomes bigger, but can you use these at 100yds, 200 yds, 300 yds? And if so, any recommendations. I know there are 2x magnifiers, but I would assume they also make the dot 2x larger, and that will affect accuracy.

    At what distance do you say, go to a scope? Thanks.


  2. #2
    New Member Array CmpsdNoMore's Avatar
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    I'm sure someone will come along to explain it in detail, but this is how I see it (no pun intended).

    Most red dot sight specifications will list the size of the dot. If the dot, for instance, is a 2MOA dot it will cover 2 approximately 2 inches at 100 yards, 4 inches at 200, etc.
    You get to the point where the dot will completely cover or extend past the edge of your target. A 2 MOA dot at 500 yards will still only cover 10 inches, pretty much fits within a man sized target.

    In my limited use of red dot sights it seems drop and magnification would be the biggest factor.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Whatever distance you can shoot something like an AR with irons sights, you can probably add a little distance to that unless you add a magnifier. Irons are typically 8 MOA, so a 2 MOA dot should be an advantage.

    As long as I can see my target, I can make torso hits at 500 yards consistently. But, I'd say 300 yards will be easy for just about anyone.

    Here's an extreme... Travis Haley running a 9" 300blk at 750 yards with a 4 MOA Aimpoint T1.

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    Member Array muddy's Avatar
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    Basically I look at it this way, if I can see something like a man size traget and my rifle will shoot that far I can kill it with a red dot. For paper punching one hole groups a red dot at 100 yards is about at its max but a red dot is not made for accurate shooting that is what a scope is for.

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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    Sights (if they don't wobble) aren't accurate or inaccurate. It's the firearm that's accurate or inaccurate. 1X red dot sights are no more inherently capable than iron sights. They're just easier to use because there are only two focal points (dot & target) rather than three focal points (rear sight, front sight & target). At what distance to go from a red dot to a scope? At whatever distance you become incapable of seeing your target & aligning your firearm to maintain YOUR required level of repeatable precision. Your equipment doesn't determine that distance, your level of vision & skills do.
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    VIP Member Array SpencerB's Avatar
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    Some soldiers in the Army use an M68 CCO optic (Aimpoint comp M4S) and have to qualify with the optic out to 300 meters.

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    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CmpsdNoMore View Post
    I'm sure someone will come along to explain it in detail, but this is how I see it (no pun intended).

    Most red dot sight specifications will list the size of the dot. If the dot, for instance, is a 2MOA dot it will cover 2 approximately 2 inches at 100 yards, 4 inches at 200, etc.
    You get to the point where the dot will completely cover or extend past the edge of your target. A 2 MOA dot at 500 yards will still only cover 10 inches, pretty much fits within a man sized target.

    In my limited use of red dot sights it seems drop and magnification would be the biggest factor.
    Thanks. I have been to several red dot web sites and they all talk about MOA. Not one of them defined MOA, they just seemed to assume that someone new to red dots would know the jargon.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    MOA-"Minute of Angle". It's (approximately) one MOA = one inch @ 100 yards. For a good technical explanation of MOA, check out the Appleseed Primer. The bigger the dot, the faster you can pick it up & on target (speed shooting at close range). The smaller the dot, the more precise the aim point (longer ranges).
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    Senior Member Array IAm_Not_Lost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    Sights (if they don't wobble) aren't accurate or inaccurate. It's the firearm that's accurate or inaccurate. 1X red dot sights are no more inherently capable than iron sights. They're just easier to use because there are only two focal points (dot & target) rather than three focal points (rear sight, front sight & target). At what distance to go from a red dot to a scope? At whatever distance you become incapable of seeing your target & aligning your firearm to maintain YOUR required level of repeatable precision. Your equipment doesn't determine that distance, your level of vision & skills do.
    Excellent overall summation of the issue.
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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAm_Not_Lost View Post
    Excellent overall summation of the issue.
    Thanks! When you've been confused for as long as I have, it's nice to assist other lost souls.
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    Sights (if they don't wobble) aren't accurate or inaccurate.
    True, but some sights are more precise than others. An AR front sight is 8 MOA, which covers very close to 8" of the target at 100 yards. Compare that to a precision front sight that is 2 MOA, for example, and the 2 MOA front sight will be more "accurate" or precise.

    So, a 2 or 4 MOA red dot that allows you to focus on the target will allow the shooter to be more accurate than an 8 MOA black post that you do have to focus on.

    But, I get what you're saying.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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