Permanently attaching a shotgun choke.

This is a discussion on Permanently attaching a shotgun choke. within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I hope I put this in the right forum. So I have a old remy model 11 that I want to make my HD/turkey gun. ...

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Thread: Permanently attaching a shotgun choke.

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    Member Array teach's Avatar
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    Permanently attaching a shotgun choke.

    I hope I put this in the right forum.

    So I have a old remy model 11 that I want to make my HD/turkey gun. The only problem is I want to replace the fixed improved cylinder to a turkey choke. I know I can send it and have it threaded but I just want a turkey choke and do not care to remove it. Is there any way to to permanently attach a choke. I was thinking of cutting down the barrel to 20" and welding in a choke.

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    Welding onto a shotgun barrel would hardly be worth the effort. Unless you finish bore or hone the added section, you can't be assured of concentricity with the rest of the barrel and you patterns would probably be worse than your existing IC choke.

    I just did a little poking around on the net and inside of 10 minutes I found a gunsmith in Iowa who'll charge you a whopping $60 to install a screw-in choke - that's pretty inexpensive.
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    Dont weld it, that could create other issues with the barrel. Like Smitty says, it's relatively cheap to have the barrel threaded to accept standard rem chokes.
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    Re: Permanently attaching a shotgun choke.

    Have you looked for aftermarket barrels?

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    The improved cylinder barrel is a little less commonly found on the Remington Model 11. Most folks during the Model 11's run thought "the more choke the better." Some opted for the modified choke, especially later in the Model 11's production. Not too many savvy shotgunners went for the improved cylinder choke and most were probably sold later rather than earlier in Model 11 production. I don't ever see them.

    I have a Model 11, acquired from the original owner who bought it new in 1931 with a set of barrels, full choke and modified choke. I later found a damaged barrel that I reduced to shortest legal length for defensive use. I'd love to have an original Model 11 improved cylinder barrel.

    Might be nice to hang onto that improved cylinder barrel and seek a common full choke barrel or else a barrel that has already had an adjustable choke installed for conversion to the choke system of your needs. There are a lot of old Model 11 barrels out there with Poly-Chokes, Cutts Compensators, and other hideous looking adjustable choke devices. For that matter if you don't mind the appearance of the adjustable chokes they give satisfactory service.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

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    I'd go with the Cutts Compensator. Since some of the M11's came with them, that'd be the way to go. You just change out the tube that you want and go with it.
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    The Cutts can be awfully handy, Hotguns. This Winchester Model 12 Skeet Grade was a special order from Winchester in 1941, factory fitted with the Cutts Compensator and provided with a set of choke tubes. It's a rare Model 12 option but is not the way I would have outfitted the gun. I got it from the same fellow who had the Remington Model 11 mentioned above and that's the way he ordered it. Being able to change out chokes is a convenient feature and the recoil reduction properties of the compensator really do work, at the expense of increased muzzle blast. External adjustable chokes and compensators ruin the look of a shotgun but were once popular with shooters.




    For shooting dove over a stock tank or ducks over decoys, this shotgun is hard to beat with the improved cylinder choke tube installed. Looks like the modified choke tube was installed when the photo was taken.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

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    Awfully nice piece of wood on that M12, Bryan!
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    Thanks for the info guys. I probably should have stated I was not thinking of just going at it with the welder, we have a welding shop here in town that I am pretty sure would do it for me and this gun is a beater I picked up for 70 bucks with a cracked stock and no bluing left. So I don't want to spend a bunch of money or anything, I just want a reliable turkey gun.

    gasmitty did you happen to save that sight from the guy in Iowa, I googled it after I saw your post and cant seem to find it.

    bmcgilvray I checked again and it is a modified choke now not a improved.

    Also do you all know if the recoil system would be affected if I did cut down the barrel?

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    I use to shoot competition shotguns some. Having screw in chokes put in is VERY inexpensive compared to buying another gun and stuff. I would put screw ins in it and viola you now have an all around gun.

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    Shouldnt be an issue as long as you keep it at 20" or more. Going any less than that might start running into cycling issues. Some work at 18" some dont.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    Shouldnt be an issue as long as you keep it at 20" or more. Going any less than that might start running into cycling issues. Some work at 18" some dont.
    Good deal I was thinking of cutting it to either 20 or 22 I can't decide.

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    "Also do you all know if the recoil system would be affected if I did cut down the barrel?"

    Yes it will. The trouble-free Remington Model 11 is a recoil operated semi-automatic shotgun designed by John M. Browning. With a bit of care they are pretty bullet proof, serving several generations of shooters and with the capability to serve several more generations of shooters. The barrel recoils rearward with the bolt until the bolt unlocks and ejects the empty hull. A recoil spring pushes the barrel/barrel extension forward, feeding the next shell. This clever arrangement is governed in the speed in which it operates by a brass friction piece or brake, a friction ring, and a friction spring. Proper set up of the recoil operated mechanism is simplicity itself, however it is important to know to set it up properly for lower-powered low-brass shells or higher powered high-brass shells. Trouble is, owner's manuals are mostly long gone and not kept with the guns and knowledge of how to operate the gun isn't shared with succeeding owners.

    When using low-brass shells, the friction ring is installed on the magazine tube first, just stowed out of the way on the tube at its base where it attaches to the receiver. The recoil spring follows the friction ring, then the brass friction brake encircled in its friction spring. Then the fore arm is installed and the magazine cap screwed down. This magazine cap should be screwed completely tight and the backed off two clicks. Detentes conveniently sound off the clicks. The mistake most make in assembly is screwing the magazine cap on completely tight and leaving it that way. In this manner the fore end is prone to crack when the gun is fired and is the reason so many fore ends are seen cracked on used examples of these shotguns.

    When using high-brass, the recoil spring is installed on the magazine tube first, the friction ring next with its flat side facing the recoil spring and it's beveled side facing the friction brake which is placed inside of the friction spring and then installed on the tube next before installing the wooden fore end and magazine cap. This friction ring works in concert with the brass friction brake to arrest some of the energy generated by the high-brass shells yet leaving enough to properly cycle the gun. Important: The tube and friction pieces need to be completely free of oil.

    Many times these simple installation procedures are reversed through ignorance of the system. If the shotgun is set up for high-brass shells and low-brass shells are used then uneven function can result. If the shotgun is set up for low-brass shells and high-brass shells are used then the shotgun gives greatly enhanced recoil and is subjected to excessive stress and battering. Excessive oil on the magazine also can cause this condition.

    These shotguns do not "kick hard" despite their reputations. Any complaints leveled against the Browning designed recoil-operated shotguns about excessive recoil or uneven functional performance almost assuredly come from ignorance in how to properly assemble these fine shotguns. This applies not only to the Remington Model 11 but also to the famous Browning Auto-5, the Savage Models 720 and 755, and also derivatives like the Franchi AL-48.

    You perceive correctly, teach. Cutting down the barrel to minimum legal length of 18-inches lightens it substantially and reduces its inertia. The shotgun with a shortened barrel functions a bit more enthusiastically. My Model 11 will shoot low-brass shells with perfect function with the friction pieces set for high-brass shells when my home-shortened barrel is installed. It would seem that the user of these recoil-operating shotguns with a shortened barrel installed should keep the friction assembly set for high-brass shells while the short barrel is being used.

    These shotguns are very reliable in their function whether a short barrel is used or the longer field barrels are in place. All that is necessary is to "follow the instructions."



    My Remington Model 11 with it's original modified barrel (bottom) and my brother-in-law's Savage Model 720 with full choke barrel (top) after a John M. Browning memorial duck hunt some years back.


    The Model 11 with it's "hose" barrel installed. In recent years I've gone over to keeping semi-automatic rifles in reach for home defense duties and have put this gun away, preferring the rifles' capabilities and capacities to the shotgun's. The Model 11 with this barrel installed will still spit out 6 rounds as fast and as dependably as one could want. I much prefer it's reliability and one-handed ease of use over any pump shotgun currently sold for self-defense purposes.
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  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    "Also do you all know if the recoil system would be affected if I did cut down the barrel?"

    Yes it will. The trouble-free Remington Model 11 is a recoil operated semi-automatic shotgun designed by John M. Browning. With a bit of care they are pretty bullet proof, serving several generations of shooters and with the capability to serve several more generations of shooters. The barrel recoils rearward with the bolt until the bolt unlocks and ejects the empty hull. A recoil spring pushes the barrel/barrel extension forward, feeding the next shell. This clever arrangement is governed in the speed in which it operates by a brass friction piece or brake, a friction ring, and a friction spring. Proper set up of the recoil operated mechanism is simplicity itself, however it is important to know to set it up properly for lower-powered low-brass shells or higher powered high-brass shells. Trouble is, owner's manuals are mostly long gone and not kept with the guns and knowledge of how to operate the gun isn't shared with succeeding owners.

    When using low-brass shells, the friction ring is installed on the magazine tube first, just stowed out of the way on the tube at its base where it attaches to the receiver. The recoil spring follows the friction ring, then the brass friction brake encircled in its friction spring. Then the fore arm is installed and the magazine cap screwed down. This magazine cap should be screwed completely tight and the backed off two clicks. Detentes conveniently sound off the clicks. The mistake most make in assembly is screwing the magazine cap on completely tight and leaving it that way. In this manner the fore end is prone to crack when the gun is fired and is the reason so many fore ends are seen cracked on used examples of these shotguns.

    When using high-brass, the recoil spring is installed on the magazine tube first, the friction ring next with its flat side facing the recoil spring and it's beveled side facing the friction brake which is placed inside of the friction spring and then installed on the tube next before installing the wooden fore end and magazine cap. This friction ring works in concert with the brass friction brake to arrest some of the energy generated by the high-brass shells yet leaving enough to properly cycle the gun. Important: The tube and friction pieces need to be completely free of oil.

    Many times these simple installation procedures are reversed through ignorance of the system. If the shotgun is set up for high-brass shells and low-brass shells are used then uneven function can result. If the shotgun is set up for low-brass shells and high-brass shells are used then the shotgun gives greatly enhanced recoil and is subjected to excessive stress and battering. Excessive oil on the magazine also can cause this condition.

    These shotguns do not "kick hard" despite their reputations. Any complaints leveled against the Browning designed recoil-operated shotguns about excessive recoil or uneven functional performance almost assuredly come from ignorance in how to properly assemble these fine shotguns. This applies not only to the Remington Model 11 but also to the famous Browning Auto-5, the Savage Models 720 and 755, and also derivatives like the Franchi AL-48.

    You perceive correctly, teach. Cutting down the barrel to minimum legal length of 18-inches lightens it substantially and reduces its inertia. The shotgun with a shortened barrel functions a bit more enthusiastically. My Model 11 will shoot low-brass shells with perfect function with the friction pieces set for high-brass shells when my home-shortened barrel is installed. It would seem that the user of these recoil-operating shotguns with a shortened barrel installed should keep the friction assembly set for high-brass shells while the short barrel is being used.

    These shotguns are very reliable in their function whether a short barrel is used or the longer field barrels are in place. All that is necessary is to "follow the instructions."



    My Remington Model 11 with it's original modified barrel (bottom) and my brother-in-law's Savage Model 720 with full choke barrel (top) after a John M. Browning memorial duck hunt some years back.


    The Model 11 with it's "hose" barrel installed. In recent years I've gone over to keeping semi-automatic rifles in reach for home defense duties and have put this gun away, preferring the rifles' capabilities and capacities to the shotgun's. The Model 11 with this barrel installed will still spit out 6 rounds as fast and as dependably as one could want. I much prefer it's reliability and one-handed ease of use over any pump shotgun currently sold for self-defense purposes.
    Thanks for the awesome write up on the model 11 I really appreciate it. Also those are some beautiful hump backs you have there.

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array Nmuskier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    "Also do you all know if the recoil system would be affected if I did cut down the barrel?"
    Great post. It's gun geek stuff is why I waste so many hours online. Thanks for sharing your knowledge before its lost.

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